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1845 - 1860

 

1845 - 1860

 

 

This first series were written mainly from or to John Phillip Green during his time in London when he was studying for his law degree and later  after been called to the Bar when  trying to establish himself in the legal profession.

 

Words I cannot fathom, are notated thus  [...] words I am not sure I have read correctly  word -  most of the latter are place and person names.

JRL : John Rylands Library [the second reference is  the one given in the original Jamison Archive]  HMA : Hayle Mill Archive

 

 

 

 

                                                                           Knutsford                                                      June 10th 1845

Dearest Emily

The event we for some time anticipated is now a reality – God’s mercy has taken your beloved Grandfather* to a holy rest. After a quiet sleep till about three o’clock this morning he awoke with a feeling of sickness which did not long continue but left him quite labouring for breath.   During the day he had some quiet intervals, but the distressful breathing soon returned, and this afternoon about five o’clock nature’s struggle was over.  Most excellent I believe has been his character and life in all the essential points.  His end has been full of calm serenity and of a strong convincing trust in the Heavenly father. We grieve that his light shines no longer among us except by the power of his example. I would we may be like him and be enabled to look forward with his confidence to the future.  Your strong affection we know, and with a mutual sympathy we […] you and you in us  we look for comfort from them who  […] all for the best. May God bless you dear Emily and  us and have us in his keeping

Yours very affectionately

Henry Green

I have got to the end of the note without adding, that we wish you to give our kind regards to Miss Martineau and say we shall be obliged if she will allow you to come home on Thursday morning by the omnibus from the Royal Hotel. It leaves I believe at ½ past 7 or 8 in the morning but as I have not the means of ascertaining I must trust to Miss M’s indulgence to make the inquiry for you during tomorrow.

*[John Brandreth]

                                                                                                                                 Sunday 23 February 1846

Extract from a letter written by Elizabeth Gaskell to Miss Barbara Ferguson whilst staying with the Greens at Knutsford :

“Emily Green asked so nicely after you.  She is so pretty in an evening having quite a brilliant colour; and both she Annie & Ellen are so beautifully dressed – they three seem all very nice, but Isabella is a little abomination as I can tell you when I see you. Here Emily is charming in temper manners & household ways but very dull over her lessons Susan says”. [probably Susan daughter of Peter Holland who married Dr Deane a widower with three children in 1844]

[Further letters of Mrs Gaskell  edited by John Chapple & Alan Shelston p.30]

 

 

Heathfield                                         The first of December

My dear J P Green

Is your cold going away now.  I wish Mamma was going to have gas in the drawing room. Papa was talking about having gas in the study but only talking about it   I do not think he will have it indeed for I do not think Mamma likes it. Do write to me for you never have written to me once within last year nor this and will you write to me the very next time you write to anybody. 

I am your affectionate

Isabella Green.

[This letter, undated,  was obviously written as a much younger child – the paper is ruled for learning to write and she has written between the lines.]

JRL Ref  Box 1/20   [Ref: JA/IG/1/c1847]

 

 

 

Harrington Street North                                            c1850

Dear Father

Since I have come to town I have been going over the ground and am sorry to say that I seem to have forgotten very much of what I have read I am afraid it will grieve you but I can truly say that I have given my best powers and all available time during the past year to prepare for this examination  I am in such a state of anxiety and  agitation that I can scarcely apply myself.  Of course I have talked with Tayler and Wills and they decidedly encourage me to go in and say that they have no doubt I shall do but still I doubt myself I do not know whether I am not even wrong in writing to you as I do not wish to give anyone anxiety about what I ought to bear myself. I know one is always in anxiety about examinations but still I was nothing at BA to what I am now.  Do you think it would be disgraceful to draw back now when one has come to town professing to the world to be ready.  As to any hopes of the scholarship they have quite vanished.  I thought I knew Stephen well by this.  I read it in Manchester then in London last year then very carefully at home last Spring and now again in town and still I seem not to know it. What am I to do.  Do write and ask my mother to write.  Do not let this disturb you as it may be only a momentary fit of despair but I could not help writing.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

I have not yet paid the £10 as they generally receive that 2 or 3 days before the day.

JRL Box 2/10     [Ref: JA/JPG/1]            

 

                                            

               Harrington Street North                                Tuesday            c1850

Dear Mother  

I have not very great deeds to tell of I am afraid I was not at all lucky in the questions none of the things that I had worked up more particularly were given. I think I did middling considering how unlucky the questions were for me and hope to get a mention in the list.   However I really cannot tell you what to expect and you must be content as I am to wait till Friday or Saturday.  I shall certainly be home on Saturday whatever Emily’s plans are and I do not think of going down to Maidstone I think it would be better to get our trip to Ireland over as soon as possible and have no fancy for staying longer in town. I will see “people” in due course and look as well as I can for the “picture” which you have so set your hearts on.  Emily says she will go down to Maidstone and come home on Friday week.

With best love

Yours affect

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/10     [Ref: JA/JPG/2]  

 

 

                                                                           32 University Street                                               c1850

Dear Father

The list of candidates for honours was put out this morning. The one for mathematics was:

Bouth (scholarship)                         Univ.Coll

Bridge                                                         

Edger                                                           

Bates                                                  Huddersfield

Malleson                                            Univ. Coll

Jefferson                                            Wesley Coll. Sheffield

J R Goulty                                         Univ.Coll

 

In classics

A  Wills (scholarship)                     Univ.Coll

{Green                                               Univ.Coll

{Jefferson                                          Wesl.Coll Sheff

Bates                                                  Huddersfield

Durant                                                Univ.Coll

Goalty                                                Univ.Coll

 

I am glad there is a scholarship given.  None was given the last two years and it is better even for the others that some one should be good enough to get it. Mr Wills gave a dinner at a hotel in the Adelphi to a circle of A Wills acquaintance. It was a very grand spread. There were 11 of us and we made ourselves very merry I assure you.  Wills went home on Saturday evening. It has been a very wet day today but my mother & aunt have been out this morning. I think I may as well read for the Flaherty but if Wills goes in I do not think there is any chance of getting it but it will be worth while having some object during this next 2 months.  It takes place in January.  J. Thornely is here now, he is reading with a Mr Richmond a conveyancer in Chancery Lane and likes him very much. He is also eating his terms at the Middle Temple.  He was very much amused the first time of dining there at the curious customs.  The benchers have a table to themselves at the higher end of the room and have a much better dinner than the students.  When they come in they march up the room and all the students have to rise and bow to them.  They all have to dine in gowns and dine in messes of four.  I am just beginning Macaulay but do not know whether to set to it now or wait till after Christmas. I rather think the latter as I intend to read Arnold’s History of Rome before long.   I and Aunt Long are going to Jullien’s concert tonight.  They are his usual annual series at Drury Lane and are always very successful.

 I do not know exactly when I shall come back but this will be rather regulated by my mother and sisters’ proceedings.

With best love to all

Believe me

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

My mother tells Mr Worthington was surprised at Bishop & Dandy not passing in the first division.

I was also given what he had told me about them.

 

              

Somerset House                   Monday morning 10 o’clock

Final state of the poll

Green (John Philip)  scholarship

Scott Caleb

MacMahon no where

 

God Save the Green and  Nassan William Senior the Examiner

 

John Philip Green 

PS  P.O. order all safe

JRL Box 2/10     [Ref: JA/JPG/3]

 

 

 

                                          John Phillip Green                               Mrs Henry Long

 

                                            

Extract  from a letter written whilst staying at Heathfield from Elizabeth Gaskell to her daughter Marianne dated Wednesday 20 October 1851:                                                                                                                    

“My dearest Polly,

Here we came yesterday, for a week exactly; and here we are sitting in the study, just 12 o’clock, Emily Annie & Ellen just came in from lessons; Mrs Green and I working till just this minute….. She later mentions that the previous week ‘Mrs Green, John Philip (Green) and Mr Steinthal came to tea in the evening…”

[The Letters of Mrs Gaskell edited by J.A.V.Chapple & Arthur Pollard letter 104 p165]

 

 

 

 

                                                            4    Inner Temple Lanes                                                Jan 31st 1852

Dear Mother

I received your note this morning and am very sorry you have felt so disappointed in not hearing from me and if you really think that is from any want of affection in me I do not see how any assurance of mine can alter your opinion.  I have not formed any such plan of writing once a fortnight but had determined not to write regularly on any fixed day. I have I confess put off writing this time longer than I ought to have done or wished to do and having been very busy is I admit again no excuse for neglecting such an easy and pleasant duty as writing to one’s dearest friends.  For the future I will try and get out of the wooden and mechanical style of which you speak and I hope you do not really hold such a bad opinion of me as you confess in your letter.  I received the half handkerchief with a note from Emily and like it very much. I think it is the sort that suit best and wear best. I find white handkerchiefs have come into fashion again for evening dress so I suppose I must get some if I am invited to any dance which at present does not lie in prospect.  It’s rather a bore to wear white handkerchiefs but suppose one will have to do as others do.  There was I am nearly sure no portfolio with the paint I took to Grundy I remember having to be careful in taking hold of the edges because of the puckers of the print.  It was I think proposed at first to send it in a portfolio but it was not carried out. I have not heard anything more definitely about the University Hall plan the council do not seem to be settled as to the course to be pursued and there seems to be a little jealousy on the part of the council of the college of having any system of private tutoring in the hall.  At any rate I shall not go there immediately not till next session if I go then.  Indeed I should not wish it as to come in while the students are in the midst of their course would need so much reading up for it that I do not think the consideration they offer would be adequate to the time which a proper performance of the proposed duties of the office would require.  I have not been able to see Mr Hutton while he was in London and so have not heard anything definite from him about it so you may consider that for the present the plan is uncertain.  I am going on very well at Mr Aspland’s and see a good deal of business going on.  He is very kind indeed in letting me see what he is doing and asks me to come into his room whenever he has anything that will be useful or instructive for me.  Indeed I do not know how I can in any way return his kindness as his business is of a kind that I cannot be of any assistance to him. I suppose Mrs Aspland is in Knutsford now.  I am glad to hear that Mrs Henry Long is better.  I delivered Miss Halls note to Mr Hall’s chambers.  He was not in at the time but next day I had an invitation to dine with him on the following Sunday.  He lives out at Bayswater just to the north of Kensington Gardens.  He has a very good house and seems altogether very well to do in the world.  Mrs Hall who was as I dare say you know a Miss Duval a niece of the great conveyancer of that name is a very kind and pleasant lady but I did not altogether like her tone rather too dashing and ambitious but good humoured and pleasant withal.  They have 5 or 6 children their eldest boy perhaps ten or twelve. Mr Hall is rather a silent man but was very kind and most of those I have heard speak of him seem to like him very much. I should think he had not read much besides law but this seems at present to be the great evil of the legal profession that there is such a mass of accumulated law pressing on the panting student that he must eschew almost everything like literary pursuits and apply himself to the great tasks of mastering the same.  Of course a lawyer in large practice like Mr Hall has not much time for anything beyond his professional pursuits and what he has he wishes no doubt to give to his family and friends. I found him nevertheless very friendly.  He goes a tour almost every year and so we had some conversation about the continent.  I have not seen anyone else that I remember but I am really so busy that I cannot go out and make calls. Mr Aspland will be going to Liverpool assizes soon and during his absence I shall be able to pay some visits with greater conscience than at present.  I hope you will believe me sorry for having delayed writing so long.  The term is now over so I do not dine any longer at the Middle Temple Hall. Easter term will not begin till the 15th of April so till that time there is an intermission in legal feastings.  I hope you are all well I have not seen Aunt Mardon very lately.

With best love to all.   Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

P.S. Direct my letters in future to Mrs Aspland 4 Inner Temple Lane as I do not always get them at my lodgings before I go out in the morning.

JRL Box 2/11    [ Ref: JA/JPG/4]

 

 

                                                                 4  Inner Temple Lanes                                            Feb 10th 1852

Dear Emily

I received your note this morning and certainly I have not to complain that you leave me unnoticed as I have received three notes from home since I wrote last.  I am very sorry to hear of your trouble in the school and of the conduct of Bagshot and Philips. I hope my father is not much distressed about it.  Do you think the success of Lieut. O’Connor had anything to do with their formation such a strange idea of a career in life.  It is quite unaccountable how they shall have wished to enlist of all things in the world unless they thought that after a time their father’s would buy them commissions – the life of a soldier of the line must I should think even to the most intransigent imagination or the greatest inexperienced be anything but a pleasant prospect.  I am glad to hear of your invitation to the Holts and you will no doubt enjoy your visit to such kind friends very much.  I have been very quiet lately but next week I have two dances in prospect the first at the Martineau’s of Brixton and the other at Mrs Fearn’s at Hampstead who was so kind as to remember me and discover my address tho’ I had not called on her since my return to London.  Indeed tho’ I have been 4 times to dances there I never yet called at the house and hardly know my way to it. Mrs Fearn however does not require young men in chambers or at college to make away their time by visits of ceremony which is very sensible.  On Sunday morning I went with Wills and his brother to Hampstead Chapel where we heard Dr Sadler. The chapel itself is a very impretending [sic] place and so retired from the road that it would not be easy to spy out without a guide. Dr Sadler gave us a very good sermon on prayer. He has a great deal of earnestness and deep pious thought.  He referred to the mechanical and contracted notion of prayer as a sort of clamorous crying out for benefits and assistance which is often entertained by all classes of Christians and thought that the best exemplification of what it was was to be found in the works of Pascal Fenclon and other pious men. 

Yesterday evening I called on Wm Roscoe I met him some days ago in the street and he asked me to come and see him.  Miss Clarke and Emily Roscoe were staying with him and Mrs Redlish! (is that the name) and her daughter were there so there was quite a large circle and it looked quite like a happy home.  Mrs William Roscoe I think you have seen at Knutsford she seems a pleasant lady enough and very fond of her husband who rubbed his hands and laughed as merrily as ever.  After coming from Hampstead Wills and I went to the Temple Church where we heard some fine music I must say I think the music and the Temple is rather too like what one hears in the concert room.  I like good chanting and choruses but I have a little objection to florid solos and shakes which only tickle the ears of the congregation and do not have any fitting influence on them. 

I am going on very pleasantly at Mr Aspland’s. I come down to chambers about 10½ and go home about 5.  I do hope you will take this note as an instalment I will write again in a day or two.  I have been so busy today that I could hardly find time

With love to all

Believe me

Yours affectionately

J P Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/5]

 

 

                                                                           Albert Street                                                  Febr 28th 1852

Dear Father

I received the packet you sent by Mrs Aspland all safely and when I use the [….] will duly consider the profound cogitations and mental labour necessary to produce such a remarkable compound. I have not tried it but the smell is at least promising and the look of it more agreeable than such mixtures generally have.  On Tuesday I was at dinner at Mr Aspland’s and heard some Knutsford news from Mrs A and was glad to hear the good account she gave of you all.  Mr Aspland will go to Liverpool assizes I believe about the middle of next month but do not know whether he will come to Knutsford or not. On Monday he is going to Durham where he has a case or two at the assizes but will not be away more than two or three days.  He does not seem much to like travelling so far but I think he will go.  My mother asks in her last letter whether I have followed out the plan I once had of getting up early.  I did so for some time at first but the late cold weather quite put a stop to it.  It is really so comfortless to get up to a cold room in the early morning several hours before breakfast and so pleasant to sit in the evening in a warmer one that I have not had virtue enough to keep up to my plan but when it is a little warmer I intend to begin again with it. I have now had more opportunity of judging if my own powers and fitness for the legal profession than I had during the 8 months I was in Manchester tho’ perhaps even now I can scarcely say anything more definite than then.  I find that I have somewhat less facility in handling the facts of a case and seizing upon the exact point of a matter in question than I had hoped to find myself possessed of.  Of course I know that the almost instinctive quickness with which a practised lawyer grasps the exact point in dispute or pounces upon the concealed weakness of an adversary or marshals the evidence he has so as most forcibly to support & bring out the proposition he wishes to establish is in great measure owing to his long experience and the constant training which this particular set of his faculties has undergone still I wish I was rather “cuter” in these respects than I am afraid I am at present.  I don’t think that mere perseverance and steadiness tho’ also necessary qualities would altogether compensate for the faculties I have mentioned.  However perhaps I ought not to look at this matter too despondingly when I think of the little practice I have had in this way and I do not find I think when I discuss matters with my equals that I am much behind them in these respects.  Mr Aspland tho’ he is very kind might perhaps encourage one a little more when one offers any remark and tho’ it is very well to be impressed with a wholesome fear of talking wide of the mark yet this fear sometimes restrains one from making a remark that might have something in it.  I have no doubt however that I am gaining a good deal by what I see & hear in Mr Aspland’s chambers and that an awakening to one’s deficiency will be a great step made.  I hope you get the Examiner regularly on Tuesday morning. Do you see the Times now. If you do I dare say you will not care to have a weekly paper and I have plenty of opportunity of seeing some paper or other here and do not much care about the Examiner.  However if you do not see the Times I dare say it will be worthwhile to continue taking the Examiner.  The Times seems if anything can be gathered from the somewhat ambiguous articles to be rather favourable at any rate not strongly opposed to the new ministry which has so suddenly & unexpectedly occupied the highest offices of the state.  I think the general feeling here seems to be an inclination to let the new Ministers have a fair trial. But there seems some doubt whether they will be able to consolidate their power and get into working order on account of their want of strength in the House of Commons.  I think there are better chances of an efficient and prudent reform of the law under the guidance of such a lawyer as Sugden than with Lord Truro Sugden is not I believe at all disinclined to reform and his profound learning and great experience must give to his suggestions & measures great value. However I am afraid that such a matter needs more quiet consideration and deliberation than the present ministers will be able to give to it and that the attacks of their numerous enemies and the difficulties of their position will give them plenty to do.  I wish however they would settle the law once and for all for some time to come. I can wait for the things I asked for till they are ready but I rather want the oil can but do not send it separately as it is not of much consequence. I hope Emily has enjoyed her visits and that they have done her good.  Mrs Aspland thought she was looking rather pale. Give my best love to all. 

Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/6]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                       March 11th  1852

Dear Mother

You will I dare say have received the scrawl I sent acknowledging the receipt of the second halves of the notes – at the time I write this I have not received the box which you were about to send when you wrote your last note so that I cannot acknowledge it also.  Your previous letter was very pleasant and I was glad to hear that R Darbishire thought well of me tho’ I think one must apply rather a stricter standard of what will be required of one than he has done. However it is gratifying to find that his opinion was favourable. Mr A’s opinion I have never heard except what came thru’ Mrs A and which does not I think amount to very much tho’   satisfactory as far as it goes. However we shall see soon what progress I make in the points where I feel myself now deficient – Mr James Thornely came to town yesterday to be ready for his marriage which takes place on Saturday. John has to perform certain functions on the occasion & among other things has been seeing after some bouquets for the bridesmaids.  He seems a little afraid on account of his inexperience in the ceremonies but I have no doubt he will be through very successfully. The marriage will take place at Little Portland Str Chapel.  Alfred is in town but I have not seen him.  His residence at Hastings has given him a good deal more strength and John speaks very hopefully about him.  He seems to have had a very pleasant circle of friends there & to have passed his time in very agreeable and cheerful occupations.

At a party lately I met our old friend J H Rathbone*    tho’ he was so changed that I certainly should not have known him and he did not remember me I had not much conversation with him. He asked after you at Knutsford.  He seems quite as odd a fish as ever but is a favourite with people here.  Vernon Darbishire and he were great friends when Vernon was in London.  Last Sunday I spent at Brixton with the Martineaus and had a pleasant walk in the country with a bright warm sun & blue sky over our head instead of the misty and impervious haze which always shrouds a “town” sky from sight.  We are not troubled with time on our hands at chambers as far as Mr A goes business is by no means in a dull way.  I have not been to any parties since the Fearns so have nothing to tell you about in that line. Shakespeare’s King John is being played now at the Princess’ and they say that it is very splendidly got up and I think I shall go some day and see it.  I saw Aunt Powell** this morning who is going today to Maidstone with one or two of the younger ones. I do not think she is looking very well at present tho’ she does not seem to complain of anything.  Aunt Mardon** I saw about 10 days ago and thought she was looking very well.  I hope you will write soon tho’ I must say I have not any reason to complain of you in this way nor to remind you that I should like to hear.

Give my best love to all. 

You have not said much about Annie & Ellen & Isabella lately how are they all

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

[*John Rathbone was a pupil at the school

**Emily Powell (nee Green) Ann Mardon (nee Green) two of Henry’s sisters]

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/7]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                                    March 16th  1852

Dear Father

I received the box safely and shall no doubt duly relish its contents I shall now be very plentifully stocked in the way of preserves.  I think it ought to have been sent by a luggage train as the carriage was 8/4  which seems a very large price for the carriage of one box so we must remember another time.  I am very sorry to hear of your indisposition and hope you are better by this time.  My mother’s last note did not give a very good account of you.  I think if I do go to Maidstone at all it will be next week or the week after and not at Easter as I may as well take the opportunity of Mr Aspland’s absence next week and then stay in town during Easter.  We have not been so busy at chambers just lately and hitherto while I have been with Mr A there has been a very equable & uniform flow of work yet it seems there are great variations in this respect.  I am reading Byles [John] on Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes when I am not otherwise engaged and find it not uninteresting department of law tho’ one which I previously knew very little about. It seems a most important subject and very many of the questions arising out of commercial transactions turn on points in the law concerning bills.  Serjeant Byles the author of the work is in very large practice and Mr Aspland has been with him as junior in several cases since I have been with him.  You may perhaps remember that he was a candidate for Aylesbury on the Protections interest and he wrote a work Sophisms of Free Trade which passed through a good many editions.  He is a member of the Essex Street congregation which is partly the reason I have told you so much about him as it is rather remarkable that he should have come out so strong a Protectionist.  Mr Justice Crompton seems to have found the bench rather a dangerous direction. On some occasion he had to wear silk stockings and having been accustomed perhaps to warm worsted ones & stout trousers he has been laid low with an attack of bronchitis or influenza and been quite incapacitated from performing his duties.  Some time ago my mother asked what was meant by the statement that he had not taken silk – it is not very usual for junior barristers (as all are who are not queen’s counsel and therefore have the right to wear a silk gown) to be made Judges all at once Mr Crompton always remained a Junior and so had never taken silk when he was called to be a Justice.  I have read some of the book my mother sent accompanied with such strong recommendations and tho’ on so short and partial an acquaintance I can hardly expect to speak about it so enthusiastically as she has done yet I must say it looks very promising.  The sudden and somewhat unaccountable explosion against lawyers and the legal profession in general which comes up at the very threshold of the work makes one think that remarks so opposed to his usual good sense were prompted by having been personally affected by legal proceedings. Perhaps having lost an estate.  But I have no doubt the book will be very companionable in my solitude and I will try duly to appreciate a book my mother admires so much.  James Thornely was married on Saturday and I believe it went off very successfully but I have not heard any particulars.  John Thornely has been down at Hastings till yesterday so that I have not been able to see him or hear anything about it.  What are you all thinking about the new ministers not very much I dare say as in England it is our happiness to live under such a settled system of government and such fixed traditions that a change in the persons of the executive is seldom if any great importance or at any rate not like it is in some other countries.  I think the present Government are to say the least in a somewhat unstraight [sic] forward and anomalous position with regard to the one question which has given them consistency & unity as a party but any rate they are likely to carry on the Government as satisfactorily as the late ministers.  I think the speech of Lord John at the meeting at his own house was very mean as if he really thinks the proposals he has made for parliamentary reform might with advantage be extended why did he not do it before he should not bid for support in opposition by offering to alter measures he had solemnly & deliberately brought forward as the best he could devise.  The same observation may be made on his promise to widen the basis of the administration.  I think however on the whole we shall get on pretty comfortably if the opposition will allow the ministers quietly to drop the subject of Protection.  I hope the next account I have of you will be better than the last.

Give my love to all & Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/8]

 

 

                                                                           Albert Street                                            March 22nd[1852]

Dear Mother

I was very glad to receive Emily’s note this morning. I think we must have a little talk together as companions in distress tho’ I do not pretend to such claims to sympathy as you have and have not been nearly so severely visited as you seem to have been.  I have no doubt that I shall be well in a day or two with a little care. I do feel rather good for nothing today but not quite so bad as not to be able to write a letter tho’ I cannot promise that it will be a very amusing one. I do not know whether I told you in my last letter that I had been to the Lyceum theatre. Mr Ashton Yates invited me to go with some of them. I dined at his house first.  Mrs Ashton Yates seemed very much indisposed and altogether not in a very happy way.  The party was Miss Sophia Yates & Miss Tring (I think) a young lady who is now staying with them Mr Ashton Bostock and myself. Miss Sophia Yates is so agreeable & clever I was particularly struck with her clear exact way of expressing her thoughts and her nice pronunciation. It is I think what one always remarks in people who are clever to begin with and have mixed much in good society.  The piece we saw was very amusing tho rather bad in morals &c the great object was to show how a clever gentlemanly rogue always managed to get himself out of difficulties by means of all sorts of tricks.  And at last when his creditors had quite got him into a corner and all hope for him seemed to be gone he escaped by a mere piece of good fortune and the piece closed with a speech warning others of the danger and folly of such courses and a resolution on his own part to change his mode of life.  Afterwards there was an extravaganza  which was less extravagant & somewhat more amusing than such things generally are.  I had thought of going to Maidstone this week or the next but Aunt Powell & several of her children are there at present and so perhaps it might not be very convenient to have so many there all at once.  It will I think be better to wait.  I do not think that to use Mr Monk’s oil  will prevent my becoming bald if such is to be my lot. It seems that most lawyers become so more or less. W. Roscoe is becoming very bald and looks very ill I think.  Of course I mean barrister Roscoe as the other Wm Roscoe is a very tough knotty subject and one would not suspect him of injuring himself with any amount of work.  You seem to have been much pleased with Niebuhr and his letter writing and other talents. I was once struck with some of his letters which I read while I was in Germany.  He must have been a thoroughly genial man in all respects and a most valuable friend.  I dare say you will observe he was once tutor to the present King of Prussia and in a letter he expressed himself in very high terms of approbation of his character and disposition.  It is remarkable that Frederick William while he was crown prince excited on all sides such high expectations and should have failed so since he became king in realizing the hopes which were formed of him. Did not Niebuhr entrust the choosing of a wife to a lady who had refused him as her husband as a mark of the confidence & respect he had for her.  I have heard a curious story of the brothers Grimm who are now professors in Berlin.  The elder one said to the younger that one of them must marry that the house was in frightful disorder & that they were cheated on all sides but that he really could not do it as he was in the middle of his great German Grammar.  On this consideration the younger brother consented to look for some one to take care of the household and be his wife. Niebuhr seems to have loved his wife very dearly tho he gained her in such an unusual way. That the work was translated by Miss Winkworth does not seem to be a secret at all here to anyone who knows her. I am still reading the “Companions” tho many of his sayings are very true & wise yet I think whenever he comes to propose any practical there is something wanting and it is just good working plans of improvement that we want now and not mere general remarks.  I hope to hear soon that you are much better and as for myself you need not have any anxiety.

Best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/9]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                         April 12th  1852

Dear Mother

I am sorry you should have expected a letter from me on Sunday morning and been disappointed and that you do not get better faster.  I hope the change of room will be pleasant & do you good and still more the change to Grandmamma’s quiet house.  Emily has been very good in sending me information about you so often and I hope the cause of her frequent writing will soon have passed away.  I have written to Grandmamma at Hayle Mill to thank her for her invitation and to say that I shall be glad to come some time hence but not just at present. I should have liked so much to come over and see you all and you particularly but I think it will be on the whole better to put if off till the summer and if there is any meeting it would I think be better for some of you to come to town than for me to make the journey.  My lodgings would accommodate two and I could get a bed out somewhere else. However you will know and be able to decide this better than I.  

On Good Friday I went with Tayler and J Roscoe an excursion towards Windsor.  We went by railway to Staines which was such a quiet prim Quaker looking village with hardly anything stirring except a few cats & dogs (tho to be sure at that time of the day) all the human beings in the place might be in church or meeting.  We walked along tho rather a dull country to a place about 3 miles distant from Windsor whose commanding tower and battlements we saw in the distance and there took a boat & had a row but our boat was such a tub that we did not make much progress and after seeing some Etonians shoot past in boats so light that two men could easily lift them out of the water we rowed back and gave up the job with tired arms and blistered hands.  We saw Runnymede and Magna Charter island which is a spot I have often wished to visit but beyond the historical association connected with the place it has nothing whatever remarkable about it being just a wide meadow and spot of ground dotted with trees.  The crowds of cockneys on the railway making their excursions to Windsor quite blocked up the stations and we almost despaired of a seat when we arrived at the station in London in the morning.  We had dinner at Mrs Roscoe’s at Richmond and reached London at 10 in the evening.  Mrs Roscoe asked after you and my father.  Tho I have often heard of her I did not feel to know her at all and do not remember having seen her tho I think I must have done at sometime or other.  On Thursday evening I had tea at Mr Asplands  Mr and Mrs Madge were there and it was rather a pleasant evening.  Mr Madge seems to have known Wordsworth very well and was telling several things about him.  I was at Essex Street last Sunday morning and heard him in a different capacity.  In the evening I went to St George’s Cathedral in Southwark and certainly there was a contrast there to the plain chapel the refined wealthy congregation and cultrated [sharp] intellectual preaching of Essex Street.  At St George’s the building & service was of course anything but plain and we had a sermon from some wild son of the church in a beard who had passed his life in converting the Indians and among the suffering poverty stricken Irish.  The bishop was there and all his clergy and looked very splendid in mitre vestments and crosier.  It was a grand day with them and so there was more than the usual no of candles which made quite a flare up as one might say.  I hope this will find you in better health and I must here close as Mr A is calling me.

Best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                         April 26th  1852

Dear Mother

I suppose you have been enjoying some rest and quiet at The Heath during the last week and I hope you feel much better for it.  The last accounts you sent were better and I hope soon to have a note from yourself.  Easter term is now on and I have begun again to dine in the Hall but the only difference or variation is that this term we have rhubarb instead of apple tart and that we dine by day light.  In other respects the process of becoming a member of that Honourable & Learned Society is unchanged. Sometimes one meets rather pleasant men there but several of the incipient purists are anything but respectable.  We generally make up a mess among ourselves so that we are not dependent on chance companions.  Last Sunday week I went to call on Mrs John Green* and saw them all.  They live in a pleasant house tho’ a long way out if one has to go to it.  This I daresay they find very pleasant.  The younger boy seems a very bright cheerful lad.  Samuel is at school at Chatham but all the others are at home.  My grandfather is staying there a few days at present.  I am going to a party on Wednesday next at the Ashton Yates and as it begins at 9½ and I received an invitation a week ago I presume it will be rather a grand one. I do not know that I enjoy their large parties very much as I do not know many of the people & they do not introduce one much indeed that seems to be done very little at London parties.  What a struggle is going on for the possession of Mdlle Wagner & her voice.  Everyone here seems quite interested in it.  When I passed thro’ Hamburg I heard her sing and in a half empty theatre but I suppose since then her fame has spread fast & far.  She has a wonderful voice and altogether a pleasing and natural manner but has no advantages of either face or figure.  I have no doubt the legal proceeding in respect to her singing in London will create a great enthusiasm as with the great bulk of an audience in England it is rather the notoriety of a singer than the real musical enjoyment they desire that attracts them  For next Friday evening Mr Thornely has procured me an entrance into the speakers gallery at the House of Commons.  The budget will be discussed and I have no doubt some interesting sparring will go on. I am having rather a gay week you see but I certainly have not the same confession to make as to the last few weeks.  I have hardly been out anywhere for the last month. I am going on pleasantly at chambers and am feeling more at home in business than at first.  I think altogether I have no need to feel discouraged at present but it is not easy work by any means.  Today is delightfully warm but how we want rain.

With best to all

Believe me  

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/11]

*[Henry’s sister-in-law]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                           May 10th 1852

Dear Mother

I hope you did not think I had forgotten the two letters I received from you and my father last week but one because I did not acknowledge them in my letter when I sat down to write my letter I intended to acknowledge them and I was surprised to hear that I did not do so. As to the University Hall affair I daresay I shall hear something more tonight as I am going to Richard Hattons and I will ask him how it stands.  But I have not hitherto heard anything more definite about it.  The letter you enclosed and which has wandered about so much was from Pettigrew who wrote to ask me to go and see the grand spectacle of the Review in Paris and the presentation of eagles to the troops by the President of the Republic and as some think it will be the inauguration of the Empire in name and form as it already in fact and reality exists.  The affair was to come off today and it was expected to be one of the grandest  sights of modern times of course even if I had not been prevented on other grounds from going it would be impossible to reach Paris today in time and I must say I am glad of such a very strong reason for not accepting such a tempting – although there are others perhaps quite as strong Pettigrew has passed the winter in Spain and enjoyed it very much indeed  but he does not say much about it as his note is nothing more than an invitation to come over and stay a few days with him at his lodgings.  He is coming to London before long and I then shall no doubt see him.

I am glad to hear that you are making progress so nicely and that Grandmamma is rather better. As to the LLB degree I shall not go in this time at any rate.         It is coming on soon Taylor Greenhow and M Martineau are going in but I think I shall wait till a more favourable time.  Last week the graduates were active in their movement for a new charter for the University of London.  On Tuesday evening there was a meeting to hear what the committee have been doing during the past year and to re-elect them to manage our cause during the coming year.  We have brighter prospects at present of obtaining our wishes than ever before.  What we want is that the Graduates should be incorporated in the University and be able to exercise some influence and be recognised as exercising it in the management of its affairs.  At present the University is only a board of senators appointed by the Queen who regulate examinations and confer degrees.  The meeting went off very well on Wednesday there was an assemblage at Somerset House to witness the conferring of degrees on candidates during the past year.  This was done by the Chancellor the Earl of Burlington but it was not at all well managed the room was much too small and a great many could not see at all. All together it was a very poor affair and not calculated to give any stranger any idea of the dignity or influence of the Institution.  However these smaller matters will I hope soon be rectified and we shall see things done in a more becoming manner.  Even this was much better than when I took my degree.  Then all that took place was that we rung a bell and were ushered into a small room and there received a parchment certificate from the under secretary which was all the blessing we got from our alma mater.  After the affair at Somerset House many of the graduates dined together and there was speechifying of rather a higher class I must say than many after dinner speeches I have heard.  Last Sunday I was at Essex Street to hear Mr Tayler preach the sermons for the domestic missions in London and I think I scarcely ever heard a better sermon. It was a contrast of the advantages and disadvantages of modern civilization of the peculiar evils of this age and state of society and a consideration of the means by which benevolence can most effectively act on the vast amount of brutality and savagery heaped together in our large towns. However delightful the cultivation of mind and refinement of manners which in some classes of society is found in a higher degree now than perhaps ever before yet modern civilization has amid all its grandeur and triumphs a very dark side and many evils and stains peculiar to itself and so he urged the cause of the missions which have been established in several of our large towns by men who have been awakened to the efforts and duties which the assistance of an ignorant and brutalized class of fellow creatures impose and he considered that the missions were one among many other means of getting at these classes and improving their sad and abject condition.  I thing everyone must have liked it very much indeed and the chapel was very full indeed. I noticed Mr Thos Ashton and his bride who was as no doubt you know one of the Miss Gairs. 

Yesterday afternoon I stayed with Wills who has sprained his ankle and is confined to the house in some measure and had some pleasant chat with him.  Heath has been in town and I was very glad to see him again.  He is articled with his father and is working at home at Warwick. I hope you will go to Southport or somewhere and get stronger. 

Will you ask my father or Emily to send off the books as I should like to have them now unless you have heard of some means of sending them very soon.  I think all you need send are Kenrick’s Greek and Kenrick’s Latin Exercises […] Latin Grammar & Buttmann’s Gr Grammar Kenricks Gr Exercises are in 4 little vols and among my books. Send the keys to both Greek & Latin Exercises as I shall have to correct in parts no doubt at any rate to see that it is right

With best love to all

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 2/11     [Ref: JA/JPG/12]

 

 

Heathfield                                                      June 13th 1852

My dear John Philip

Emily has a cold & she is going to stay at home.  Miss Lucy Holland is gone to stay with Mrs and Miss Worthington near Borrowdale.  We shall have two little kittens they will be just at the right age for play when you come home their birthday is the 8th of June.  Last Wednesday Papa went with the boys to Pickmere to fish some of them fished and the others rowed we are going there in the holidays when you come home. Mamma wrote to Mrs Swinburne to ask two of the girls to come but they had made their plans for the summer and they could not come. Yesterday was Brandreth’s birthday his presents were a leather satchel from Aunt & Uncle a saw from Anne Brandreth and a wheelbarrow from Louisa and Catherine he had been longing for a satchel as he thought one would make him quite complete he took it to Mere Heyes* yesterday with some books in it.  There is a bark stack at Mere Heyes thatched and fastened together round the edges which I imagine is for Brandreth when he has Mere Heyes for Uncle keeps having fresh bark to use and that stays unmolested. John Broadbent has been at Grove House for a day & a night.  The moss case bed is so full of birds & they look very promising.  The rhododendrons are nearly in their prime.  Meta Gaskell told Annie that Annie Austen asked her whether she knew where your coat was made at for that it fitted so beautifully that she would have her riding dress made there.  Ellen is dining with Aunt Anna today.  Anne Brandreth is going to Lytham early tomorrow morning.  Sometime these holidays Jane Brandreth with Ralph & Libbie Fletcher are going to stay at Grove House

Affectionately

Isabella Green

[*Whites 1860 Directory shows that all the land in Mere was in the possession of Lanford Brookes except for 40 acres belonging to John & Henry Long & 12 acres of Egertons]

[Written when Isabella was 11 years old – lines were drawn on the sheet to enable her to write straight!] [This letter is torn along the folds]

JRL Ref  Box 1/21  [Ref: JA/IG/2/1852]

 

 

 

 

Tabley Mere (near Mere Heyes) by Lucy Holland

 

 

 

[There are no letters from John Phillip between May 1852 and January 1854 when he returned to London, when he was teaching in a school and attending law lectures.   From extracts from letters written by Elizabeth Gaskell in September and December (shown below) the first to her daughter Marianne and the second to Mary Green - it seems likely that he returned to Cheshire and assisted his father at the school.  

 

                                                                                                                          Tuesday morning 21 September 1852

 “Saturday I dragged Meta out in the rain to Miss Mitchell’s, when we heard that Father Newman was going to preach the next day, so Selina, Stephen, J.P.Green and I went to hear him.  J.P.G came back here to dinner, and staid nearly all the afternoon….

[The Letters of Mrs Gaskell edited by J.A.V.Chapple & Arthur Pollard:  Letter 133 p 200]

                                                                                                                                                                            

                                                                                                               c12 December 1852

 “John Philip will be a great gain to you all; only for his sake I hope his stay at Knutsford & in that occupation will be but temporary”

[Further letters of Mrs Gaskell  edited by John Chapple & Alan Shelston p.76]

 

 

 

 

                                                            1 Eton villas                                                    Jan 21st  1854

Dear Mother

You may make yourself quite easy about me and my health Dr Powell did not think much of my cold tho’ it was rather troublesome and painful to have to talk much. I got some port wine from Mr Case and it has really had a most beneficial effect on my throat and in two days I expect to be quite well again.  I dare say you wish to hear something about my school experiences. I have a class of about 20 boys and what I have to do with them is to teach Latin.  The time they take daily is from two to three hours.  2 hours each morning I am hearing them in class and then to correct exercises &c takes nearly an hour a day. I have hardly got enough into the work yet to tell you how I shall like it but just at first I must say I do not altogether like it.  The boys in my class are not very far advanced and are rather a rough lot. But some of them seem nice boys and when I get the others work in hand I hope we shall get on more comfortably.  I suppose at first there is the difficulty which I have had and that I ought to expect it so after a few weeks I shall be better able to give an opinion. Mr Key and the other masters are very pleasant and friendly and in all other respects my position is quite comfortable. I am glad I shall have only one subject to teach as I shall not be occupied in any way with the school except the hours I have mentioned.  I have begun to attend law lectures and think I shall enjoy that very much.  There are 3 public lectures (3 a week) which I shall attend and 1 private lecture (3 times a week) and with these I shall have quite enough to do.  I am very much pleased with my new lodgings and expect indeed to be so comfortable here that I shall be almost spoiled for any other London lodgings at least lodgings at anything like the price of these.  I am glad to hear my father is safe home.  Will you ask my father if he will send me Robson’s Latin Exercises (the 2nd edition).  If it will come by post for 6d perhaps that will be the best way and send it soon.  I do not want a new one sent and if he wants his 2nd edition copy or has to use a new one I may as well get one here but all I mean is if he does not need the copy he has been using I should like to have it. I had the letters yesterday one from dream land the other from the realm of every day and this morning again brought the one from the dreamer.  I think a Daniel at least would be required to interpret her hapless vision. Good bye & love to all

Yours affect.

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/12     [Ref: JA/JPG/13]

 

                                                           

               London                                                            Jan 28th 1854

Dear Father

The book you sent for me arrived safely and I was glad to have it so soon.  All the class had the second edition and this differs in some points from the edition I had with me before.  I feel to be getting on better in the school now.  At the beginning of this week I felt the work very laborious and irksome and it seemed as if there was no means of reducing to order the unruly elements I had to deal with.  I think the last master that had the class I have did not manage very well in fact did not at all like the work and let the class become very much disorganised. I have had better hopes the last three days and I think there is a decided improvement.  There are 23 in the class now and besides these I have a class of 14 for one hour. I think I shall manage not to take up any more time than the 3 hours.  I do not think that what Mr Case said about it being easy work & not necessarily exhausting is quite carried out.  But as I say I hope everyday will be better in this respect.

I am of course going to the law lectures and like some of them very well but they are not altogether what I expect. I am rather disappointed at not being able to attend either the private class in Jurisprudence or that on Constitutional History both the subjects which I thought would be better fitted for this year’s attendance than any others.  The readers in both these subjects have their private classes in the morning so of course the school prevents me from going.

I have not called on any one except the Shaens since I have come here. I have been so occupied first with settling in lodgings and then with getting rid of my cold that I have had scarcely time to look about me.  Last night I had a call from James Brooks who managed to get safe through the muddy dangers of the passage up to my abode. Macculloch also did the same a few nights ago but found the case so bad that he will almost be intimidated from a second attempt till drier weather.  Daylight and by this time accurate knowledge of the ground carry me thro without any serious inconvenience.  James Brooks has just passed his examination as an attorney and is being sworn in the Queen’s Bench today in the Court of Chancery on Tuesday.  I have not seen Aunt Mardon yet but thought of going up to Islington tomorrow.  You must not any of you think that because I have been talking in such a doleful strain about the school and the mud and the lectures that I am anything but as jolly as can be expected under the circumstances.  I hope you will be well suited in Mr Allen and that all will go on well with you.  I have not been to Mr Case’s this time since his boys came back but I fancy he has a good number of boys from the north now.  I am sure it is a very nice place for any boy to be as both Mr & Mrs Case seem so ready to converse and enter into all that their boys are doing and interested about.  He seems quite to be thoroughly in earnest in teaching and I think has considerable influence over those he is with tho’ at first I did not think so highly of him as I now do.  I have inquired about the Magasin Pittoresque at Rolandes for Madle L’Amy and they say that if they send it the postage will be 6d a month in addition to the price but that if any bookseller at Leamington Madle L’Amy has dealings with have a London agent they could send it every month to him & then it would only be 2d additional and come to her thro’ the Leamington bookseller.  Of course she might order it direct at a Leamington bookshop.  Let her hear this will you and that I have been prevented  from going about it sooner but not from forgetfulness. Tell Ellen I shall hold myself a debtor to her in a letter

With best love to all

Yours very affectionately     

John Philip Green  

JRL Box 2/12     [Ref: JA/JPG/14]

 

                                                       1 Eton villas, Haverstock Hill  London                          Feb 3rd  1854

Dear Mother

Today has been a whole holyday at the school in commemoration of Routh an old pupil in the school and student in the college having come off senior wrangler at Cambridge.  It is not very uncommon for those who have run a successful career at the London University to migrate to the older universities and  try for a slice or two of the solid pudding with which those wealthier societies reward  intellectual eminence. Routh took his BA degree the same year that I did and took off the scholarship and I knew him before a little but he was such a rough uncouth customer that much intimacy was out of the question – tho’ of course of first rate mathematical ability he always seemed singularly deficient in appreciation of the niceties of language and the beauties of literature.

I think I have been getting on better with my classes since I last wrote and I have had Mr Key’s aid and hope that I shall get on more easily.  Of course in so large a class there will be some few who will be obstreperous and suffice to throw all into disturbance and if one can once subdue these unruly spirits all will go on well.  I must say that a great many in the class are very nice boys indeed and anything but undesirous to improve.  The new class has been given me in the middle hour so that it does not make much difference to me.  The larger class I have the 1st & 3rd hour in the morning and the 2nd hour the smaller one.  Tho’ I cannot attend the history and jurisprudence private classes this year I shall be able to do so next year without interfering with any engagement in chambers and so this year I have made up my mind to go to the private classes on real property law & equity which do fall in with the hours I have at leisure. The public lectures I am attending regularly. As far as the juripr [sic] private class is concerned at present they are doing just what I did in Germany and I dare say I know fully more about it than any of the class. Last week I called on Harry Holland at his chambers & had a talk with him.  I found him very friendly but I do not know that I derived any very material new information to help me.  He seemed to think it would not be a bad thing to settle as a provincial barrister in Manchester for instance. I suppose he himself has no reason to complain of the way in which fortune has treated him but he said that among his acquaintance he knew many who could grumble about the difficulties and uncertainties of the legal profession at present.  However he said that no profession was content but all cried out that things were not easier.  He did not see any disadvantages in my present course of not going into chambers for a year but following out a plan of private reading but thought that perhaps a year was too long and that if I really intended to push on in the law he thought I had better enter chambers after six months or 9 months.  Mr Aspland I have seen once or twice at his chambers but he has been in a hurry & engaged both times so that I have not had any opportunities for talking with him.  The roads are much better now and there is a good chance of getting thro’ with clean boots.  I am very comfortable here and in price the lodgings are the best I have ever been in.  The only disagreeables are that the servant has a very heavy foot and stumps up stairs just as if she were on stilts and that there is a piano next door.  When I mention these as disagreeables you may be sure there is not very much to complain of.  On Wednesday afternoon I went with Brooks to Sydenham to see the Crystal Palace which no doubt my father has told you about.  Brooks went back on Thursday.  I believe Ch. Broadbent has been in town for a couple of days but I have not seen him. I must make a few calls next week and look up my friends. With best love to all    Believe me

Your very affectionate

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/12     [Ref: JA/JPG/15]

 

 London                                                                       Feb 18th  1854

Dear Emily

I have let my letter run on rather longer than I intended but I suppose you will allow that hitherto I have been very regular.  I am getting on pretty well at the school now and I am rather surprised to find by the report day coming round that I have been at it rather more than a month.  At the same time I find it rather hard work and if I could meet with some other engagement that would be convenient with my other pursuits in relation to time of day and regularity I should like to do so.  I have not looked out at all yet as I have not wished at all to give up this till I was sure how it would really be.  You must not think I am quite dissatisfied but simply that I find the work rather more tiring than I expected.

On Sunday evening I was at Mrs Shaens and passed a very pleasant evening.  Mrs Gaskell and Marianne were there (on their way from their Paris trip).  Mr Samuel  the commissioner and Prof. Newman who by the way has fallen into the somewhat prevalent fashion of a hairy chin and upper lip.  I should think Mrs Gaskell enjoyed her visit but she did not say much about it and my chief informant in relation to it was Marianne whom I saw safely home to the Tagarts at Hampstead where she was staying.  I think Mrs G went home on Tuesday.  On Thursday evening I went with Mr Case to one of the Hampstead conversaziones of which perhaps you may have heard.  All the people in Hampstead  seemed to be there and there were some nice things to look at.  The chief interest of the evening was an exhibition of engravings in different stages as altered by the artists directions of Turner’s Liber Studiorum.  There was a Mr Pye there an old engraver who seemed very enthusiastic about them made some remarks & gave explanations of the changes and the reason for them which Turner introduced and altogether it was very interesting.  I renewed my acquaintance with several of the Hampstead people and thus my visit fulfilled the purpose of a special call.       I hope you are all well at Knutsford. I do not know whether you have the same sudden changes of weather which we have had here but I know that here they are trying enough.  I have joined the Whittington Club again chiefly that I may regularly have the opportunity of seeing the papers and also because one can dine there rather more comfortably and perhaps in better company than in a chop house.  I have seen several men there who belong to the Middle Temple but the general run of members of the club are I think rather below the line.  Hannah Tayler has returned home I called there about a week ago to see them and she asked after you.  Has Mamma ever got the tea from Mrs Schunck I have not heard whether the transaction was completed or not. I hope my father is going on comfortably with Mr Allen.  Last Saturday I saw Mr. James Yates who has been suffering from cold but this had not damped Mrs Yates’s spirits or stopped the continuous flow of her conversation.  He was sorry to have been from home when my father called.  Now that there are parliamentary debates as well as large quantities of foreign intelligence to read one needs a full hour today for that alone.  The coldstream guards on turning out of barracks here en route for Chichester and thence to the Mediterranean created quite a sensation as they marched thro the streets and the temper of a very large portion of the English is no doubt very warlike just now. 

Best love to all and to Grove House [home of the Henry Longs] & the Heath [Grandma & Ann Brandreth]  & Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/12     [Ref: JA/JPG/16]

 

                                                                            London                                                                        Feb 21st  1854

Dear Mother

I do not think you can quite fairly say I am three letters in your debt.  When I wrote on Saturday I was only one in debt and it is only because you have written two so close together that your statement is literally true.  I shall not at all think of giving up my engagement at the school before the term ends even if I did then and in the meantime I do not wish you or any one else to believe that I am dissatisfied or discontented  all I have said or meant to say is that I find it rather harder work than I had been led to expect.  Last Sunday I dined and spent the afternoon at the Tagarts and it was the first time I had been there except at a party.  There was only Mr & Mr Tagart Miss Lucy Tagart and a Miss Taylor.  I had a pleasant visit and I must say that both Mr & Mrs Tagart were very “civil” and gracious.  I called at the Wedgwoods but the house is closed to all strangers on account of there being scarlet fever. One of the younger children has had it but I believe is better now.  I have not seen Mr Martineau the hour he gives his lecture exactly interferes with the jurisprudence lecture at the Middle Temple and this is the one which I least of all wish to miss so I am afraid I shall not be able to hear him tho’ I should like to do so very much.  You asked me a little while ago what I thought of the affair at Harrow school.  At that time I had heard nothing about it and it was only a few days ago that I saw the correspondence which has passed.  When such men as Dr Arnold & Dr Vaughan with their experience and exact knowledge of what a large public school is deliberately defend the system of entrusting the head boys with the power of personal chastisement I for one am quite ready to believe that it is the best course under the circumstances – I do not think that in this particular case Platt is to be justified in the extremely severe exercise of his authority but still where such a power is regularly acknowledged I do not see anything degrading or immoral in one boy caning another for rudeness and want of deference.  J Thornely has been to Liverpool sessions and has held a brief in a prosecution.  He seems to be trying whatever comes in his way tho’ criminal law and sessions business are not at all in the line of what he has been reading during the last three years.  I think Tayler will be called soon after Easter so you see I shall be a good deal younger in standing if I am called tho’ not much younger in years.  I find I have a good deal  of time to do what I want tho’ the lecture comes just in the middle of the afternoon and rather cuts up the day inconveniently.   I believe Mrs Schunck has been in town lately.  I still feel as comfortable in my lodgings as I did and if it was not quite so far should think myself very fortunate in that respect.  When I enlist & go off to Turkey I will not forget to give you full notice.

With best love

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                London                                                                    March 9th   1854

Dear Father

You have I have no doubt received my note giving the result of my interview with Sir E Buxton.  I should not have had any objection to an engagement of the kind that would have been and I am rather sorry his plan had changed.  The more immediate object of my writing today is to ask you to send me £10 or £15.   I find that the first quarter of my scholarship was due the 1st of January and that the next day will be the first of April and of course I have had nothing yet from the school.  I thought of using my scholarship provisionally but replacing it out of what I get from the school and considering it rather as appropriated to whatever use I may find for it next year as paying a barrister’s fee &c.  But just at present I think I must come upon you for a little supply.  If you would send half a note by return of post.  I could receive the second half on Monday by which time what I have will I think beat an end.  I find now one disadvantage in having such a long walk every day that it makes me sleepy in the evening and prevents me getting thro’ much hard reading in the evening and I must really find some way of gaining a different habit.  I must bring this to a close as I am writing it in class and will write again at the end of the week.  I was sorry to hear my grandfather is so ill.  I saw Aunt Mardon on Sunday before she went down and she promised to write and give me an account how she found him but I have not had any letter yet.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                      March 11th 1854

Dear Mother

I received your letter this morning and the enclosure safely. I rather wished this year to have been quite on my own hook but you will understand the circumstances I am in just at present.

I did I remember omit to mention that Sir G Buxton spoke about another son who was coming home from Harrow and only just recovering from the scarletina for whom he would want a tutor before long but it was not mentioned as at all safe for anyone to be near him yet and as I have never had the scarletina Lady Buxton said it would not be at all right to put myself in danger especially considering my engagement at the school. Very little indeed was said about it and this is why I did not mention to you tho possibly it would have been better had I done so.  I think I shall just call on Mrs Charles Buxton and thank her and explain a little more,  as the way she mentions it in the extract Miss Holland gives in her note seems to make it appear as if I was afraid.  However I dare say that is not what she means. I was very sorry indeed to have a letter from Aunt Elizabeth this morning with such bad account of my grandfather. Aunt Mardon promised to write when I saw her on Sunday and my not hearing nothing during the week I supposed he was better or not any worse.  I should have liked to go down to Maidstone for a day and see him once more but as according to her account he is not able to recognize anyone and as I dare say they are occupied and anxious enough perhaps it will be better not.  We shall be sorry to lose him a kind hearted good man as he was but from the account Elizabeth’s letter contains I should judge there is no hope his living.

When I saw Dr Carpenter this week he told me that Mr Murland had called on him and thought of sending his son to the hall so I suppose you have heard something about his leaving. From what Dr Carpenter said I judged Mr Murland thought of sending Samuel to college at the beginning of next session in October.  I am sorry to hear Ellen is at one of her old tricks again I hoped that as she approached years of discretion she would gradually have come to a consciousness of the high impropriety and inexpediency of colds in whatever form.  You do not tell me anything about Grove House people or about Aunt Anna and Grandmamma. I suppose they are all well and happy by your saying nothing to the contrary.

Give all my best love and believe me

Yours very affect     

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                    March 13th [1854]

Dear Mother,

Before my note reaches you you will no doubt have heard that my Grandfather* died on Saturday morning about 11 o, clock.  Harry Powell came to me yesterday in the early part of the afternoon to tell me and of course I did not go to Hampstead to the Fearns.  He arrived just as I was setting out. I called at Finsbury Square yesterday evening and saw Aunt Powell who told me more about it than Harry had done. My grandfather tho’ he had in a great measure lost all consciousness towards the last does not seem to have suffered much from his complaint and all that could be done was done.  We shall all be very sorry to lose him and shall think of him as a good & thoroughly kind hearted man. Will my father come to Maidstone I suppose he will and how will it be about my going down. Let me hear by return please.  I received your note safely this morning and have hurried up just in time to answer it. I think if you would direct ordinary letters to University school it would be better as I should then get them early in the morning. However in such a case as this it was perhaps better as it was, give my love to my father and all

& believe

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

If my father comes would you ask him to bring up my Caesar not I think in my bed room but it was in the schoolroom. It is a small dark-backed book and is Dachne’s Edition.  I am wanting it in class.

*[John Green formerly of Hayle Mill but then living in Ashford Road, Maidstone.  Henry Green was his executor]

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London                                                       March 25th1854

Dear Mother,

I really think I shall have to draw up an inventory of the questions you put to me and then when I write refer to it and be sure that in the exuberant flow of other matter I do not pass any one by.  However sorry for past omissions I will now, with the advantages of a new quill and the quiet which reigns at this hour of 11 p.m. try to satisfy you for once.  As to the examination I never thought of going in this year nor next either, I presume you do not know there are 3 examinations every year and 3 scholarships awarded every year and the idea is that students should go in just before they intend to be called to the bar and not at the beginning of their preparatory course.  So there is plenty of time for that matter to be taken in hand.  If you thought of the great extent of the examination you would easily understand that I am at least 2 years off being ready tho’ what I did last year will be in one or two of the branches of great use to me. 

As to my shirts one or two of the linen ones are a little ragged and of course buttons have not an unlimited tenacity but I should not I think be in any degree accounted disreputable on account of my “linen”. 

As to my Sunday occupations three or four Sundays I have had colds and stayed in to nurse them about twice I have been out with Tayler and Thornely and twice I have been to Essex Street and about four times to Lincolns Inn.  I generally hear something I like from Mr Maurice. The sermons I have heard this year from him have been chiefly taken from events in Jewish History or passages in the Psalms and tho’ to most minds these are not so full of interest and meaning as other parts of the Bible yet Mr Maurice seems to have such a power of entering into and presenting all forms and manifestations of religious sentiment and life that he makes them yield much valuable and practical teaching.  Two of the sermons I have heard have been on the dispositions which prompt sacrifices and what wholly different states of mind the act may be then effect of.  I can’t say I very much liked any of the Unitarian Ministers in London and I do not know that I feel much the better or wiser for going to hear them tho I am quite willing to confess that it may be the fault of my own heart that the form of doctrine they present does not influence it.  I do not wish to judge or censure anyone and what I hope and seek for is some guide to lighten my own dark reason and conquer whatever is evil in me. 

The party at the Ashton Yates was not a dance.  All the rooms were hung round with pictures or engravings and very beautiful indeed many of them were.  There were etchings by Rubens and many of the old masters and some very fine old engravings in short quite an hours work to see them all.  There were a good many people there but not many I knew.  Mrs Ashton was not there on account of illness nothing very serious I hope.  Mr Ashton was as kind and pleasant as ever and in short I enjoyed it very much.  There was one thing there which I had never seen before and that was a series of impressions showing the process of producing the tinted lithographs which look just like water colours.  It seems that each paper has to be applied to about 18 stones on each of which there is a different tint supplying or modifying some part of the impression produced by the preceding stone.  The result is a picture quite I think equal to a regular painting and of course a great deal cheaper. 

I told my father who no doubt told you about having seen the James.  All that passed which had reference to my plan was that Mr James after dinner told me I had much better not think of giving up

the law and that he thought that the difficulties in my way had not prevented others from succeeding  and in short was altogether encouraging. He says his father allowed him £200 a year after he was called but that he did not need it more than a year and a half but that he considered he had been particularly fortunate in town getting into practice.  You know that this will be just the difficult time in my case and I confess in spite of his words of encouragement I do not yet see my way quite clearly.  I like Mrs James very much and feel that they are and intend to be very kind to me.  The Ashton Yates’ enquired after Grandmamma & Aunt and all of you. I quite wished Aunt had been there she would so have enjoyed it. I was myself rather glad it was the kind of party it was rather than a dance.  Well I am afraid if I go on any longer I shall not be ready to get up in the morning in time. So with best love to all

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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London                                                          April 3rd  1854

Dear Father

I received the parcel of books safely this afternoon but I was not at home soon enough to write by today’s post I found the opening somewhat of a trial for my nails but with patience I effected a dissolution of the knots.  I think I did not tell you that just at present for a few weeks I have a pupil reading an hour a day with me. His name is Burrows and his father is one of the physicians to Guy’s Hospital and a physician in large practice in Cavendish Square.  The boy is between 15 & 16 but looks much older and till lately has been at Harrow.  He comes to me between 4 & 5 which now there are no law lectures is easy enough for me to effect.  He is rather a nice fellow but not very far advanced in several branches of study.  In fact the only thing he seems to have learnt well is how to make Latin verses. He was never in decimal fractions before.  Last week I was at a party at Tulse Hill at the Martineaus which I enjoyed pretty well.  Mrs Tagart was so kind as to give Scott and me a ride back in her carriage which was an immense benefit.  Boult is working hard for his degree which he is going in for next October.  He will go in for honours in both branches and as he has during his visit to the Antipodes made rather a long cessation of labour I have no doubt he will have quite enough on his hands for the next four or five months .  On Wednesday the 12th the Easter vacation at the school begins it lasts I think about 12 or 14 days and then the long term of the year beings and there is no break till August.  I am glad to hear there is a probability (or is it more) of your having Heald.   I suppose I must forward to Maidstone the parcel you enclosed          Is there any haste needful about it.  I saw the John Greens last Sunday week  I went over to Mile End

With best love to all

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

I think it will be much better that Uncle Charles should be executor instead of me

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London                                                      April 12th  [1854]

Dear Mother

I will try this time to in parliamentary language a categorical answer to your enquiries.  First as to paying a visit to the north to see you all.  I do not very well see how I can manage it.  The law lectures begin again next week so I should have to be back to them. Then my pupil Burrows comes to me every day at present. I do not expect to have him long after Easter and I am afraid if I was to go away now I might not have him again.  At first his father spoke of about 3 weeks till Easter but I think it will be about a month altogether. It was Mr Adams one of the masters in the school who mentioned the engagement to me and me to Dr Burrows.  Mr Adams had himself been tutor to the youth several times but could not be so again on account of being fully engaged otherwise. I should very much like to come home but it will I think be better not in the circumstances.  I shall find some change in going to the British Museum and reading quietly there instead of coming to the school  I have not yet settled with Dr Burrows what I am to have but Mr Adams tells me I should have 5/- an hour which  no doubt will be what Dr Burrows would expect and think right to give.  As to the smoking at Heathfield I never had an idea of it at any rate while I was there and I have no remembrance of having heard of it in Mr Worthington’s days or before.  At any rate as a practice I never heard of it.  I quite think with you that it was an unfortunate combination of circumstances about the time you mention which brought the school down.  I hope it will improve now  I do not see why it shouldn’t.  I have seen Mr James Yates several times since my first call both at his own house and elsewhere.  Mrs Ashton Yates has been confined to her room for some weeks with some illness I do not know what. I called on Saturday to ask and heard she was better but had not yet left her room. Today I shall receive payment for the school work of this term and this amount of “dibbs” will quite set me up for some time. I never heard of Oakfield in fact have quite enough of reading in other things.  I have not seen Aunt Mardon  do you know whether she is come back from Maidstone  I had a card from James Brooks on Saturday telling me of his father’s death  I am going to write to him today.  The holydays here are nearly a fortnight and then begins the long term of 3 full months and those the hot months which I expect will be the most trying in the year  I dare say by August I shall be rather in want of rest and country air.  The law term too continues till the end of July so that there will be work enough in several ways.  I am sorry enough that we are to have a perhaps long and troublesome war coming in to interrupt our progress and prosperity but still I believe it is a struggle which sooner or later must have come to pass.  I think it has become quite necessary for the independence of several of the countries of Europe that we and France who have the power and means should give a decided and energetic check to the advance of Russia.  It is a government and nation from which great danger is to be apprehended and the sooner we do what is necessary the easier it will be.  I saw Mr Wedgwood last Saturday but not Mrs  I had a very pleasant chat with him

With best love  Believe me 

Yours very affectionately

 John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                         April 22nd 1854

Dear Father

I don’t know whether this very welcome rain has been blown across to the eastern shores of our island nor even whether it may not have come from that rainy quarter in the first instance but I have no doubt you are very glad to see it. The weather has been so fine that one got quite tired of sunny unclouded skies and longed for some more all embracing means of laying in general dustiness of creation than the water carts.  The law lectures began last Wednesday and I expect they will find me full employment till the end of July.  I think of going to two of the private classes each class meets for an hour every other day and there is a public lecture by one of the readers every day except Saturday. The two classes I shall go to are Real Property and Common Law and I think that for a time to go to classes where you are called upon to talk yourself and say what you know or do not know will be quite as useful as being in Chambers.  I saw Mr James on Thursday. He asked me to call on him at chambers. I had done so about 10 days before but he was out of town then so I went again.  I think he approves of what I am doing at present tho’ he rather recommends me not to put off commencing with a conveyancer till Christmas.  However I think it will be better to continue as I am till then.  I have not been out of town at all this Easter except a day which I spent at Richmond with J Thornely.  I think he has some business  but not a great deal. I should think he is likely to get on after a little waiting but as he says it is rather dreary work sitting in chambers reading law or anything else and without the stimulus of actual work.  Wills I think is doing well but his London work does not increase much he has however a good deal at the assizes and sessions in the country.  Greenhow and Martineau will be called this term and on Thursday they will entertain their friends at supper in commemoration of their induction into professional life. Tayler too will be called this term so that I am quite behind in this respect all my friends.  As to the Henry Long affair Emily says I do not congratulate her. I felt that you know the circumstances at home so much better that there was no good in me having a say in the matter but I am sure I wish the girls all success and happiness in the undertaking. Today my pupil comes to me for the last time next week he is going into the country to school again. I saw Dr Burrows a day or two ago and he seemed quite satisfied with what his son had been doing. He is a very agreeable man with the manners which all the London physicians seem to have by nature or art.  The school begins on Thursday.  It fits in just with the classes I am now going to as I have just ½ an hour between the end of school and the lecture hour to reach the Temple or Lincolns Inn.  I suppose Mrs Aspland has been to Knutsford . I am sorry to hear how much Mr Henry Long is troubled with rheumatism. It must be a serious impediment to happiness and enjoyment of life where it becomes as severe as his.  Next week there will be a party at the Fearns to which I am going. I met Mr Samuel Gaskell (but I told you that I think)

With best love to you all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

I hope the Brook House party have returned all the better for Leamington air.

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                                             London                                                           May 5th 1854

Dear Mother

I hope you will be satisfied to hear that an account of the proceedings on Wednesday were in all the morning papers of yesterday and that the name of all on whom degrees were conferred have been published abroad so far as the London newspapers can do it.             As there is an account in the Times

I suppose you will not want any other paper sent.  As to the important point of costume it appeared to me better to hire a gown and not put on Tayler’s.  The LLB gown is a dark purple stuff with two strips of velvet in front of a rich blue whereas the MA is black with velvet front of a delicate lilac tint. Tho’ an accurate knowledge of the appropriate costume might not have been very general in the audience I thought that to appear in arts instead of laws costume would have made me feel awkward and in fact would not have been proper.  So I determined to get a dress on my own account and fork out the 10/6 for the hours use of the thing. The whole affair was rather slow and formal.  The noble earl the Chancellor was not there but was represented by J G Lefevre the Vice Chancellor a man I believe of very solid acquirements and talents but certainly as dry and formal an old gentleman as I ever saw.  There were representatives of the different colleges who when each name was called out took the man by the hand and led him up to the chair and introduced him to the Vice Chancellor who then took him by the hand and pronounced the formal words conferring the degree.  After all the degrees were over the honours scholarships prizes &c were conferred in the same way & there the affair closed without any oration from any one. The place was very full and I saw a good many persons I knew there.  The library is a long room and not at all well adapted for the purpose as far as seeing goes.  In the evening the graduates dinner took place and went off very well. There was some speaking and I got a place among a very pleasant lot of the older graduates near the chair.  There were about 60 present at the dinner  I was not called on to speak as the toast of the new graduates is answered by one of the younger men who have first taken a degree at all and the other toasts were questions more immediately connected with the plans and proceedings of the graduates committee which I do not belong to.  What I was going to say sometime ago about Mr Samuel Gaskell was that I had met him at Essex Street Chapel and that he had asked me to come and see him.  Yesterday he sent me a note inviting me to dine with him and go to the Royal Institution tonight with him and so I am going accordingly. I do not know what is to be done at the Royal Institution but on Friday evenings there is always I believe some good lecture to be heard.  Has the frost spoilt all the pears and apples in your parts as it has near London.  This warm weather is pleasant again.

Best love  Yours vy affection 

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                         May 17th 1854

Dear Annie

I find nearly a fortnight has passed since I let you know that I am still in the land of the living. I saw William Tagart a little while ago who said he had seen you at Birkenhead lately.  I have not anything to do with him at the school but sometimes see him. He seems rather a lively young man but decidedly old-headed in his manners and ways. The Tagarts are giving a party next Tuesday at which I suppose there will be a good many people  I must say I don’t so much care for the ordinary run of dances. They are just the same over again and one is not able to get away time enough to have a reasonable amount of sleep before ½ past seven you will think I am talking quite like an old fogey already and that I want “shaking up” like old Smallweed. I called in Bryanstone Square on Sunday afternoon but no one was at home so I have not seen the Miss Yateses yet.  I dare say they will ask me to spend the evening which will be the mode of entertainment suited to my quiet early habits.   There are many temptations in the musical line staring one in the face on all sides on the placards in the streets. Fidelis Don Giovanni Fieischütz &c &c but I have as yet gone to any of them.  The company at Drury Lane I believe is very good and tho’ they have not the great singers which the Italian Opera has yet the conductor Lindpaintner is rather a famous man and I have no doubt one would get a good 2/- worth of sound vocal and instrumental by spending an evening there.  The chief lady a phrase which I suppose is equivalent to prima donna tho’ it sounds by no means so glib in one’s mouth is Madame Caradon who I presume tho’ maybe incorrectly is Madame Caradon Allan.  However I dare say you know all these facts quite as well as I do.  Has Ellen done with Halle now. Hannah Tayler I think told me the Halles had taken a house in town for some time. I saw the Taylers about a fortnight ago John I see pretty often.  He has introduced me to the Forensic Society a law debating club which meets every week in the hall of Lyons Inn  I have not been to any meeting yet as I have only just been elected a member.  It will be rather a more formidable affair than the college one as there are older men in it many members are barristers. I had a pleasant note from Stephen a few days ago who seems very busy with business and dissatisfied with the dearth of festivities in Manchester.  Are the Henry Longs come back from Buxton I shall want to hear how you go on with them. It will be rather late before I shall be able to come home I think not till about the 4th August so your holydays will be just over.  Grandmamma* has come back from Bow to Boxworth Grove and today I believe she has returned to Maidstone. I saw her on Saturday evening and thought she was looking better than she did a fortnight before.  Aunt Mardon said she thought her visit to London had done her good and that she was much better than when she came. Aunt Elizabeth came to town for one night last week to choose a piano for Emily Powell who is now come home for good to take her place as the daughter of the house.

Goodbye or I shall not be up by six with the best love to you all

Your very affection

John Philip Green

The parcel of books were sent

*[Ann Green]

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                              London                                                         May 27th  1854

Dear Mother

I have been going on very well since my last letter and really my health is as sound as could be wished.  So that I cannot in anyway be gratified in exciting a little anxiety on my own account.  I have been going on pretty well at the school this term and tho’ of course there are occasional relapses & disappointments I think the classes are in general in a satisfactory way.  Mr Case I am sorry to say is at present very ill.  He has been overworking himself and I don’t think he has a very good constitution to begin with. He has a good many engagements besides the school and his boys (16) in an evening and about a week ago gave up and has been very ill since.  I suppose it is some kind of low fever but I do not think Mrs Case likes it to be spread about that he has a fever I mean that she is afraid of it being exaggerated. He has to be very quiet and will not be in working order for sometime to come.  I am very sorry as it is so inconvenient for one is his position.  Mrs Case asked me to help in the evening some of the younger boys. I think Lane Evans goes at present but she was not sure whether he could go on.  I shall feel it rather an inconvenience and rather hope I shall not be wanted but I could not exactly refuse to help and he has been kind to me always.  I have not quite fixed whether to go on with the school till Christmas but you may depend on my letting Mr Key know in good time what my intention is.  The Tagarts gave a pleasant party on Tuesday last.  The rooms were very full and good music and other accompaniments of festivity. I was rather surprised to meet Mr Gaskell there. He is staying a few days with his brother. May Harvey and Meta Gaskell were there and of course I danced with both.  The former seems coming out very decidedly and I had some very pleasant “turns” with her.  How grey Mr Gaskell is getting I never noticed it & as much as on Tuesday.  The only thing that I heard from Mr Samuel Gaskell a few weeks ago which particularly affected me was that he thought some literary engagement would be the best thing to look for and that he did not think it by any means so difficult.  The only thing is one feels no particular impulse to write & I do not know that I have ever shown any signs of a particularly forcible or elegant style. However he seems to have done it and tho’ no doubt he is a man of some power in his line and I should think great strength of will he has not as far as I see any genius or imagination.  I went to the Ashton Yates last Saturday. It had been a dinner party and subsided into an evening party about 9 o’clock. Miss Ellen Yates was in her room and did not come into the evening but I saw Miss Yates who has been pretty well since she came to town. Mrs Ashton has recovered her illness in fact I never saw her looking so well. The Bostocks & Phillips were there Miss Harriet Yates and a good many I did not know.  Russell Martineau was there. He is in town about his MA degree. He played a piece but it did not seem quite appreciated.  I think there are not nearly so many people in London who know much about music as there were in the country.       As to where you

should direct my letters. I think I like getting them best when I reach home in the evenings as then one has a quiet read over tea. But if there is any note you want me to have before post these in the evening direct to the school.   Well I have tried to remember all you want to know and hope it will be satisfactory.  The law lectures begin on Monday again after a temporary vacation.

Best love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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Extract from a letter written to her youngest sister, Alice, dated Bedford Row (Emily’s home) 7 June 1854  from Catherine Winkworth whilst in London with the Gaskells :

 “J.P.Green took Selina and me to the Temple Church, afterwards with Mrs G. to the Wedgwoods’ to dine, after which we went to the Carlyles, where we stayed about two and half hours. There were very few people there; some of the Leeds Marshalls, a Mr and Mrs Brookfield, he a fashionable Belgravian preacher, a wit, and diner out; she a sweet looking woman, said to be the original of Thackeray’s Amelia. Mr Carlyle talked chiefly to me, and next most to Meta! Which was odd of him, but very pleasant for us. Altogether he was very friendly, and I enjoyed listening to him very much “

[JRL Ref: L&M vol.1 p.443]

                             

                              London                                                          June 20th 1854

Dear Emily,

I think I have not written since I received the letter enclosing one from our American friend.  He has made a curious omission in not sending the letter which I was to address and send to the gentleman from S Carolina the pleasure of whose acquaintance it was to procure me. As there is hardly time to communicate across the wide Atlantic I think I shall write to the address given in Paris and say how the matter stands lest it should be thought that I have been neglectful.  When my father comes to town which I suppose he intends doing at the end of this month please send the book by him.  I should almost fancy that there may be something of Pettigrew’s own production in it as it seems scarcely worth while sending the number only because several of his acquaintances are contributors.  I am afraid I shall forget how to write English at least presuming that I ever could as just now I am busied with what are called by the collective name of the Real Property Statutes and certainly as far as ‘style and expression’ go they are about as uninviting and repulsive morsels of English as may be found.  Sometimes after carefully pouring over a sentence which winds laboriously over a good half page of letterpress broken into delectable provisos & “notwithstanding” & “nevertheless” one is tempted to exclaim and is this what every man & women in this realm is presumed to be familiar with.  I suppose one must be content with a sort of coral-insect life & for some time at any rate follow out a blind instinct guided mode of working making minute but continual acquisitions and gradually some result may manifest itself.  I suppose the school will break up this week.  We shall go on thro’ July and rather lost work it will be I am afraid.  Mr Case is not returned to town yet but I believe he is going on well.  I hope you have read all the numbers of the Newcomer.   I always look for the 1st day of each month with great impatience as I then lay out  2d  in the hire of the new number & carry it home and have a quiet read over my tea & bread & butter.  I like it very much indeed and think it the best thing Thackeray has ever done.  The French pictures seem the great run now Mrs Gaskell was very much pleased with them. I think she went twice once with Mr Forster of Goldsmith and examiner renown.  I sometimes think of reading some modern French books indeed I have been reading Pascal but find it somewhat of a study instead of an amusement. Tayler has been to Manchester in attendance on the Duchy Court held there last week.  He had something to do indeed he went down because he had.  I was in Thornely’s chambers 2 days ago and who should come in but James Jevons*. He had arrived the day before & is now in Liverpool.  He is a good deal altered and of course from his kind of life and pursuits not for the better and as far as [….…]go but he seemed glad to see me and talked pleasantly enough.  I am sorry his undertaking has not turned out better.  It is a good piece of his life spent at least if little has been done. However he will have gained a good deal of experience and I hope the old country will treat him better than the Cape seems to have done.

Ever your affectionate brother

John Philip Green

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*[A former pupil at Heathfield]

 

                                                                           London                                                             October 9th

Dear  Mother

I am just setting off to make a call on Mr & Mrs A Hills in their new abode. I saw the Taylers yesterday (not Mr T) and they seem to have enjoyed their journey and stay on the Lake of Geneva very much indeed.  John however on his way home got hold of what has in some way turned out a bad attack of rheumatism and when I saw him yesterday he had a shawl round him and was keeping warm near the fire.  He is of course anxious that he may be quite well before term beings as he has a brief in one of the courts & of course would not at all like being absent.  I went to Islington last night but the house seemed locked up and no body in it.  I did not go to Finsbury Sq as I was afraid that even by that course I should miss seeing the Mardons & Grandmamma. So I shall  have another try in a few days.  After the Hills call I think I shall go to hear Mr Taylers inaugural lecture at three and as it is now nearly 2 I have not much time to write.  If you send anything by the Asplands on Wednesday let me hear please on Wednesday morning that I may be able to meet them at the station & relieve them of their charge. I find the new rooms tho’ not quite so roomy quite as comfortable as those I had in the early part of the year.  I shall have to get a book case.

Best love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                   October 17th  1854

Dear Father

I dare say you are wishing to know whether I am quite settled in my plans and occupations.  Mr Braithwaite has not returned to town so soon as was expected and I have not begun to go to chambers yet.  He will I believe be back again on Saturday and on Monday I am to go down to him and begin work.  Fry has not yet returned to town and so I have not yet heard what manner of fellow-pupils I shall have.  I fancy at any rate quiet ones and one of them Howard passed a successful course at University College.  The lectures will also begin next week which is later than I expected.  I thought they began about the 12th of October.  I saw Dr Carpenter at University Hall on the day of Mr Tayler’s discourse (which I liked very much) and he asked about Murland and Kay but there was nothing to say more than they were to come up this week.  I did not know then that Murland had gone on to the continent with his father.  I have been chiefly employed in reading certain matters preparatory to going to Mr Braithwaite and I think I shall waite[sic] and I think I shall enter quite prepared with enough previous information to take full advantage of the work I see there . I have called to see Mr Key but he has lost a relation and has not been at the school for nearly a week and I am thinking of going again this morning. I shall ask him if he can help me in any way to find some occupation in teaching in the evenings.  I think I could manage an hour or two a day very easily.  Rushton one of the masters says he expects to have to refuse one or two pupils soon and he will do what he can for me. I believe that just now teachers are not so much wanted as in the spring and summer and even if I do not get much now I may when I leave Mr Braithwaite do something to make up.  I feel very well indeed and quite think that I shall be doing well in going to the broad  brim.    Our friend McCulloch has appeared again after a three month sojourn in Heidelberg where Dana now a Doctor intrinsque juris is still abiding.  The latter intends visiting England shortly and will not be very long before he returns to the United States.  McCulloch thinks he intends to try for a chair as professor of Civil Law (for which he is of course very well qualified) in one of the American Universities.

I saw Grandmamma last Sunday evening. She seemed very well and in good spirits and Aunt Mardon as well.  I hope you are all very well and that you find Mr Stuart “answers”.

Best love to you all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                       Octr 24th  [1854]

Dear Emily

I hope that it is the fault of the Postmaster  General or some one or more of his subordinates that I have not received intelligence from home in any form or shape since last Tuesday week a period of no less than 14 weeks [sic].  I may myself have sometime allowed that period to elapse without dispatching a letter but you cannot say I have done so this last time as I have written 3 times since I left home.  I went yesterday to our professional “friend” but he has not yet made his appearance however the clerk had received a communication from him to the effect that he would be at work on Wednesday morning (tomorrow)  I hear he begins at 9 in the morning which of itself indicates a hardworking man as most conveyancers even in large practice are content to shew themselves at chambers at 10½ or 11.  Now do some one send some kind of a note to let me hear what is going on at home.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                          Octr 28th  1854

Dear Mother

I am glad my remonstrance has produced much good fruit in the shape of three letters from different members of the family. First and foremost you ask with a dash under the “have” have I paid certain matters quite implying that you supposed I had forgotten as I usually do.  However for your satisfaction I can assure that both the liabilities are discharged.  I have not seen anyone lately.  I called at the Wedgwoods but they were not at home.  Also at Mr Ashton Yates who was alone in his great house.  Painting &c was going on and he was sleeping at Highgate.  He asked me what I was doing and as he usually does wished I could contrive some means of shortening deeds as when his lawyers bring long skins of parchment with long involved sentences recitals provisions declarations and  conditions drawn out in array he is quite bewildered and finds it quite impossible to carry thro’ them.   Since Wednesday morning I have been at Chambers all day and there is anything but lack of employment there.  I think I decidedly like our “friend” and if this week is a specimen of the help and occupation his pupils get I do not think I could have gone to a better master.  There are two other pupils one Fisher who I think is a young Attorney from Liverpool the other is Howard of Tottenham formerly a Quaker family but I do not think Fisher is.  Fisher of course knows more practice but I do not think he has read as much Law as I have.  Howard is more of a beginner but he seems a clever industrious man and so I think in my fellow pupils I am fortunate. As for the “governor” he is a very odd man like a wise bird an owl than a man. He has us in every morning to read a law book for about an hour or an hour & ½ and discuss any point that arises.  The rest of the day is filled up with reading papers (not of news) or drawing different instruments.  There seems plenty to do and of a good improving kind.  As I think I told you Mr Braithwaite is at work at 9 in the morning and does not leave till 5 or 6 so you may judge he is not one who takes it easily.  I fancy he come from Kendal or those parts as I have seen letters about with that address.  He lives in Mornington Crescent.  You must not think from my description that he is a mere lawyer.  From what Fry tells me and from his style of talking he must be a good scholar and well read in many branches besides real property.  We have a great heap of papers in just now which relate to a cause which will come before the courts next term and which Mr Braithwaite regards with great interest.  The same estates were before the Court of Chancery 40 yrs ago but you must not suppose litigation has been going on all that time.  Tayler is rather better and indeed has been coming to chambers for sometime past. Both he and Thornely have been having some work to enliven their days in Chancery Lane.  I shall go and call on Murland & Kay soon. 

Last Sunday I had a cold & did not go out and on Monday only a short time but that is quite gone now.  I think I always have one when I first come to town.  I do not think I have anything more to tell you as nothing whatever has happened to me. With many thanks to Ellen & Emily for their letters & best love to all

Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                          Novr 4th   1854

Dear Mother

I was glad to be able to tell you last week after a few days in Mr Braithwaite’s chambers that I thought I had chosen well in becoming his pupil.  We have been going on very pleasantly this week & from the quantity and kind of the business he has and the hour and a half’s reading we have with him every morning I feel I shall be able to learn a great deal.  On Thursday being the first of Michaelmas term Howard & I went to Westminster to see the Ld Chancellor and Judges walk in state in all the glory of full bottoms gold lace and ermine thro’ the Hall and open their respective courts.  There was a great crowd in the hall more than I have ever seen present on such an occasion.  I saw Thom. Harvey in one of the courts. He is come to be with Sharpe & Field for a time and has taken up his abode in Canonbury which you may remember is not very far from Highbury.  I shall try & improve the acquaintance I have with him as I have liked what I have ever seen of him very much.  Thornely and Heath were at Wills the other evening in council with others as to the choice of a piano for Mrs Alfred for which article of “furniture” and entertainment her father is ready & willing to put down to the amount of £160.  I should think for that sum a pretty good instrument will grace our friends drawing room. 

What a long time it seems before we get any decisive news from Sebastopol.  I do not mean of the actual capture of the fortress but of what has been done since the siege commenced.  I think the last news does not look quite so favourable and indeed we must not expect to take such a place without considerable sacrifice of lives.

Boult is in the first division of B.A. but I think no one else that you know.  He has been in for honours as well but the result is not yet declared.  Alfred Bache of Birmingham is expected to stand very high in mathematics.  The last two years he has I understand been with an engineer in Birmingham and attending classes at Queen’s College there.  He is I believe to be an engineer and Boult seems to think a good deal of him.  Dear Annie she would feel leaving home but it would not be to go among strangers and far from her friends.  She will always have you near to talk to if she has any difficulties & anxieties and I am sure & hope she will have very few of them.  I hope you have got more settled in your household affairs than when I last heard about them and that a satisfactory cook has been captured at last.  There are long lists of them in the Times & some of them would condescend so far as to think the country no objection but I suppose you go on a different plan of finding one to that.  Today I have been reading an immensely long settlement (or rather part of it) on the marriage of the late Duke of Northumberland which settlement was prepared by Sir E Sugden late Ld Chancellor some thirty years ago.  It is really anything but dry work reading the family arrangements and dispositions of property of such a great house as that of Northumberland and to note the ingenious devices which conveyancers have to meet all possible contingencies and keep the property strictly settled and yet to give all kinds of powers for the advantageous management of the estate and for making provision for wives present & future and younger children.  You may judge from this that Mr Braithwaite has now and then a client of undeniable “respectability”.  We have the deeds for the purpose of settling some more property since purchased in the same way as the other has been.  Fry has been a long tour this vacation.  Thro’ Germany to Florence Milan Venice &c     I just saw them today but had not time to hear much from him.  I have not yet heard of any pupils in the evening but I have taken I think the most likely course to get them by speaking to Prof. Key & several of the masters at the school.  The lectures begin next week and I shall attend some of them but of course I shall rather feel I am away from Mr Braithwaite when I am at lecture.  Still I had better finish my years course which this next term will do and then I shall be in any case qualified to be called to the bar.

With best love to you all and thanking the various writers of letters.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                             London                                                       Novr  11th   1854

Dear Emily

I have been quite disappointed today in not having had time to write. It is just post time and all the day I have been engaged with Mr Braithwaite in his room and not able to come out.  Last night Mr Braithwaite asked me and Howard to his house to tea.  We found Fry and Wm Fowler and two young Quakers there.  Mrs Braithwaite is such an out and out Quakeress large mob cap short straight down dress and altogether so solemn & prim that I think it was wonderful I could hold in at the view of such a personage.  In regard to her face she was really rather handsome and one could only regret anyone should so spoil herself.  The conversation was interesting Mr Braithwaite has a great deal to talk about and is a very easy pleasant man in spite of his oddities. He seems to be very largely read in a branch of learning one would scarcely expect to find pursued by members of his society viz the Christian Fathers.  He read aloud and challenged our admiration of several passages from Tertullians Apology.  I do not think I have anything to tell you of occurrences during the past week.  I have been very well and fully occupied all day either here or at home in the evenings and in short a record of days in which nothing is remarkable is all I have to offer.  I think between ourselves Mr Braithwaite likes me and thinks I go about the right way to derive advantage from what I see & hear.  I am oftener with him than the others indeed for 3 last evenings he has been minded to have me in his room after 4 quite regardless that by ¼ to 6 every person begins to feel a desire of food. 

As I said at first I am now writing quite at high pressure and with best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                       Novr  18th   1854

Dear Ellen

The last week has been real London autumn weather dirty slushy streets misty damp atmosphere and generally uncomfortable and disagreeable. Today we have had an east wind which has cleared off the fogs a little & yesterday there was a “call” at the Middle temple and 6 individuals one of whom I knew took the oaths of allegiance & supremacy and dined with the students for the last time.  The first man who walked up the hall was a tall dark native of Trinidad (I do not mean a coloured man) with a moustache which contrasted most curiously with his white horsehair wig and made me quite sure that if ever “the bar” take to Schmurbarts they must give up horsehair.  There is a rumour that the Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn refused to call a man because he had a capillary decoration on his upper lip.  About 3 days ago I received a note from Miss Roget saying that her brother had been intending to call on me at Haverstock Hill but had not been able and inviting me to dine with them on Tuesday an invitation which I spoilt at least four sheets of small note paper in properly answering and accepting. Another matter that arises from your letter is that I really do not think I shall be able to leave town at Christmas.   You see I am paying Mr Braithwaite 2 guineas a week while I am with him and it would scarcely worth while to come home for less time than a week and considering this & the expenses of a journey to and fro I think it will be scarcely worth while.  I should very much like to be at any festive assembly of the kind you mention but you will I think see that this time it can scarcely be managed.  I think it will be better in future to direct to me at chambers as you propose as it is much pleasanter not to have to wait till evening for letters and so for the future address care of J. B. Braithwaite Esq.  3 New Square Linc Inn.  I think the Esq should be put in by strangers tho’ of course among themselves the friends never use such titles and do not think them proper even when addressed by strangers. I am afraid I have written a very nonsensical letter but a settlement on the marriage of Anthony Gibbs & Isabella Gordon has been occupying my thoughts and my hand is rather stiff with scribbling.

Love to all

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                         Nov 25th 1854

Dear Annie

I am sorry to hear you have been having an attack of influenza anything like which I know from experience to be disagreeable enough. You attribute to me that I once said horrid signified bristling. Of course that means in its primary sense, Horseo the Latin word is to shrink (back properly spoken of an animal) so that the hair bristles up and stands apart so anything which has this effect on the nervous organisation of beast or man is very properly called a “horrid” thing. 

I enjoyed my dinner at the Rogets on Tuesday very much an awfully wet evening which made several of the party a little behind time from being minus cab at the nick of time. There was a Mr & Mrs Allen (he a barrister whom I have seen before but not to know) a Mr Mallet and a Miss Thompson. 

I do not think there is anything particular to tell of the conversation. It was not scientific at any rate and the nearest approach to science was Dr Roget’s Railway Chess Board which he shewed [sic] me and which seems convenient enough.  The “Doctor” and Miss and John were all very pleasant and lively.  The chief topic discoursed over there and no doubt over many & many English dinner tables was the exploits and difficulties of our gallant countrymen who are besieging the Ce rs southern stronghold. I think most people here are feeling very anxious for them as the large and well equipped forces which have lately been brought down to divert them from the siege have put quite a different look on the whole thing. I dare you will remember hearing that Mr Ashton Bostock is out with his regiment the Scots Fusiliers.  I believe they have had good accounts of him hitherto but still the life of a surgeon in the midst of such scenes as we are now reading of must be both excessively arduous and dangerous – whatever may have been said in times of peace of the luxurious ness and effeminacy of officers in the army I think they have lately amply proved that the old indomitable firmness and disregard of danger and adversity belongs to them still.  I am sorry to hear such a poor account of Mary Green, the last I heard of her was from Aunt Mardon and then she was better. Will you ask my father whether he does not wish me to call to see about some premium being paid – I suppose he has not forgotten it but I have not had any directions about it yet. Jullien has brought out a new grand quadrille in his descriptive style about the allied armies. I have not yet heard it but I have been once or twice since they commenced last Tuesday in the Beethoven Festival when he plays almost exclusively from our beloved Ludwig and I think I must really go to hear that.  I shall call at the Rogets tomorrow and am very glad to have the opportunity of knowing them.

With best love   

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                       Decr  2nd    1854

Dear Mother

It is very strange to think that I have been more than 5 weeks with Mr Braithwait it scarcely appears more than a fortnight.  I think it shows I do not at any rate find the days too long for what I have to do in them.  I think I am going on very well and find my work getting easier and more comprehensible but to become a good conveyancer as to learn any other technical and intellectual art is not the work of a few weeks.  Tho’ of course I find many difficulties and cannot hit the exact forms of expression deemed necessary.  I like the occupation very much & should not at all object to pass any evenings at chambers.  But I think 7 ½  or 8 good hours work together is pretty nearly as much as at present with any advantage I can do and then I have the private law class every evening either for one or two hours so that altogether I get a pretty good dose of law every day.  I called on Murland & Kay yesterday evening and found them seated over their tea in a very pleasant room on the second floor of the Hall. They seem from what they told me to have made a good start and to like their new mode of  life as indeed is natural enough. Murland has a good many friends in London and both he & Kay visit a good deal but seemed to be quite in the right way as to not neglecting their more serious business.      Tayler I am sorry to say is still very unwell.  He went to Hastings for a visit but since his return has been much worse and has not been at chambers for some time. I am afraid it is complaint of the heart and I know his friends are very anxious about him but when I called to ask how he was on the morning of  Thursday the account was that he was better.  He himself must feel it a great disappointment to lay up and keep to the house when he has just commenced his course as a barrister. You must understand that I have not heard from any of his family that he has heart complaint but I suppose it must be that that they are really afraid of.  J Thornely has been to Manchester to the Lancaster Chancery Court but I have not seen him since his return.  I have joined the Whittington again as in the evenings there are often spaces of time before the classes when I do not very well know what to do with myself or to go and also that I may see the papers regularly. The place itself and the members are not quite what I like but still as I only want to read the papers there it will not much matter. For instance there are lawyers clerks there and many rather low people. Rupert Potter tells me his father has directed him to enter the Reform Club which under the auspices of Thos Thornely & Richd Cobden MMP.  I fancy from what he said that Mr Edmund Potter will before very long come to live in town & enter parliament. I often see Rupert now and am rather fond of him. He is reading with Mr King conveyancer in Old Square. I am sorry to hear that the parties have to be put off but hope they are [not] given up altogether.  Emily gave me some account of your domestic state which will not I hope be a permanent one as it must be very unpleasant and unsettled.

With best love

Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Lincolns Inn                                                     Dec 8th 1854

Dear Isabella

I think you had always better write to me on the Thursday instead of Friday as I shall find it easier to write overnight at home than here during the day when I am often pressed for time.

You will be sorry to lose Forrester as many’s the canter you and others have had upon him and many the healthy fresh blow.  I dare say you remember me telling that I had subscribed to the Whittington Club so that I might have been some where to see the papers.  Well the place was burnt down last Sunday and my guinea might just as well have been dropped into the Thames.  I believe the place made a jolly blaze and “was only finally got under only by the unremitting exertions of the fireman” to adopt the language which newspapers make use of in describing such occurrences.  So Mama’s solicitude as to the danger of my manners being permanently made uncouth by belonging to such an institution may be quite set at rest by its unforeseen and sudden fate.  This week has been very wretched in London almost perpetual mizzle which has not let my throat abee (if the word is so spelled I’m sure I don’t know) but I do not think there is much amiss.  The men in hospital at Scutari seem to get well twice as fast when seen to by their English Nurses.  I think all of you had better volunteer I’m sure you would come up to the regulation height whatever might be said of Annie & Ellen.  Today perhaps it may interest you to know I have been engaged in drawing a lease of slate quarries & different mines in Caernarvon and both the names of places & persons are about us Cambrian as could be wished.  How does Brandreth do at school.  I do not think you have told me very lately.

I suppose you all saw in the paper the difference between the Emperor of Russia & the James Newspaper well in case you did not I will tell you. One is the type of despotism and the other the despotism of type.  I don’t think it is bad tho’ not very original. I have not been anywhere this week except chambers & lodgings & have nothing to tell you.

Give my kind regards to your two visitors &

With best love to you all

Believe me

Your affectionate brother

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                       Decr  16th   1854

Dear Mother

Tho’ I am quite willing to acknowledge your great authority on a point of spelling I must beg to maintain that solicitude need not have two lls.  I think it is more commonly found with two but one is quite enough.  It is quite as often solicitor as sollicitor.    My cold is much better now and without having had recourse to any physic taking and a day or two will see me all right again.  I suppose you will be dispatching the boys before very long and are looking forward to the pleasant Christmas season.  I hope some one will take pity on me on Christmas Day as it will certainly be rather forlorn to eat one’s dinner alone in a tavern.  Even the winter I was in Berlin Mr Solly asked me and Worthington to feed with him.  I have not seen anything more of the Rogets.  I have called once I dined there but they were out and John is at present on the northern circuit marshalling Mr Justice Erle about.  We go on very comfortably at chambers. Mr Braithwaite has been about once or twice this week and so work has had gone on quite in such full owing but with one thing or another there is always occupation enough.  I am very much afraid John Tayler does not improve at all. Yesterday I called and he was not so well and was not able to see me which has never been the case yet. I did not see any of the family but Thornely saw Mrs Tayler a day or two since and says that she is very anxious indeed.  You ask me what I am doing on Sundays.  Last week I went to hear Mr Maurice in the afternoon whose theme was the influences for good which a great struggle such as England is now engaged in calls forth and strengthens.  That the willingness to submit to sacrifices and the necessity of making them breaks in upon and counteracts the selfishness and sordidness of much of English life and in the presence of much that is sad and terrible this is one of compensations which we have.  Twice since I returned to town I have heard Dr Manning but he has finished his course of instructions now.  I must confess I like him better than any other preacher and am sorry that you were prevented from forming a more favourable opinion of him than you did.  After the misrepresentations and prejudices one has been accustomed to find in almost every protestant pulpit whenever Roman Catholicism is spoken of it is pleasant to say the least to hear a man who really enters into and fairly states objections to the doctrines he has to establish.  I hope dear Annie has got well rid of her cold and that you and all the rest are well.  Grandmamma Green asked me whether any of you were intending to pay them a visit but I said I had not heard anything about it.  I suppose you are not thinking of doing so.  I met Mr Tinker in an omnibus rather curiously a day or two ago. It seems he has an undertaking in the Borough for making different sorts of wheels by steam power.  He seemed well and busy but in externals there was something to be desired and the broad northern dialect sounded odd in this great city tho’ one is pretty used to it in a different latitude.  Tomorrow I think I must call on Mr James Yates whom I have not yet seen

With best love    Believe me dear mother

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                  London                                                  Decr  18th   1854

Dear Mother

We are all very much grieved at the loss of our dear friend Tayler * [John Hutton Tayler]. Tho’ every one was feeling considerable anxiety about him it has come as a great shock that we shall never again have companionship with that kind generous and affectionate heart.  I cannot tell you anything of his illness at the last.  I told you that when I called on Thursday he was not so well and Thornely tells me that Mrs Tayler told him on the same day that his breathing was very short and troublesome and seemed altogether very anxious.  I did not see any of the family when I called. He died on Saturday morning between 12 and 1 but I did not know till yesterday evening Thornely sent me word on Saturday but his boy misunderstood him and posted the note instead of leaving it and I have never got it as it was not fully directed.  I saw Thornely & Wills this morning but they neither of them knew anything about the family. A sadder blow to them cannot be conceived I am sure they were all as fond of him as could be he was quite the life of the house. I am sure there is scarcely any one I know who had so many friends and attached friends too and no one whose prospects were better of a happy and useful career.

I was going down from Highgate in an omnibus to call and see how he was yesterday evening when I first heard of his death from Mr Ashton Yates who had seen it in the Inquirer.

I will write again as soon as I can.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

*[“On December 16th the only son of Mr J.J.Tayler died from heart complaint after a few week’s illness. He was a young man of great promise, excellent in character; of very remarkable abilities, had obtained the highest honours at London University and he was very attached to my sister Selina. His death was an overwhelming blow to our dear friends, his parents, and a great sorrow to us all.’ …

[Letters and Memorials of Catherine Winkworth eds Susanna Winkworth and M J Shaen. Vol.1.p 471]

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                                                                           London                                                      Decr  23rd    1854

Dear Mother

Thank you for sending me such a pleasant remembrance of the dear friend we have lost you may be sure I had looked among my letters in my desk to find all I had and was glad that I had preserved three besides the one you have sent. Thornely shewed me a note he had received from Tayler while he was at St Leonards this autumn and we were both of us very much struck at the difference in the handwriting between that and his former ones.  It was so shaky and undecided.  On Thursday most of his friends attended his earthly remains to the grave.  Will Thornely Greenhow Martineau Potter & myself holding the corners of the pall as the coffin was borne up the chapel. Mr Madge addressed some simple earnest words of consolation to his mourning friends and to the rest who were assembled and read part of XV chapter of Corinthians and then we passed out and laid our friend in his grave.  The relatives who attended were his poor father two of his uncles and his cousins Osler and J Martineau of Birmingham.  There were thirty or forty persons there altogether all the Manchester college students among others.  Mr Tayler was able to bear up against his sorrow and I hope they all are but it will be a sad thought for them for a long time to come.  I hear this morning that Mr Tayler wishes the law books John had to be divided among his more immediate friends and so we shall have something to remind us of him in what perhaps we shall be using as often as anything else.

I am sorry to hear that you will not have your normal Christmas meeting but of course it could not be under the circumstances.  I was rather afraid I should fall under your censure as having managed matters badly in not finding anyone to have pity on a solitary youth on Christmas Day but on Wednesday evening I had a note from our kind friend J Ashton Yates asking me to dine with them in Bryanston Square so you see I am not quite reduced to dine in solitude.

I must request you to send me a supply of money as I have come to the end of what I have. This week I bought some law books at an auction prudent purchases really and books that I shall certainly want and do use everyday.   If you write tomorrow you should direct to Haverstock Hill as I shall not come to chambers either Monday or Tuesday.

Best love and a Happy Christmas to you at Heathfield where I wish I was for a peep at you

& believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                        Decr  25th   1854

Dear Mother

I don’t think there was anything you asked except about Tom Harvey which I did not answer. He was at Mr Asplands the day I dined there and I had a very pleasant day with them.  I had intended asking him to breakfast with me and have called once or twice at Sharpe & Fields to see him but he has always been out but I intend to try again this week or get his address from Mr Aspland.  Yesterday I went down to Brixton to spend the day with Meadows & Greenhow and did not go to Essex Street.  I did not hear that any mention or reference was to be made to Tayler’s death and if there was I shall be very sorry not to have been.  I believe the Taylers are gone to Nottingham for Christmas and when they come back I shall call there. I think and should have liked to do so before but I thought just at first they would prefer being without any visitors but near relatives.  The funeral took place at The Highgate Cemetery.  It was Wills proposed to Mr Tayler that some of his son’s friends should take part and he says that Mr Tayler was quite pleased and gratified that it should be so.  I do not know whether we should have been invited otherwise. I received the enclosed note safely and it will be sufficient for the present as I have not anything to pay now. I am afraid your Christmas Day has not been quite so pleasant as it normally is when we are all assembled but it is always a joyful and happy time.

With best love & hoping dear Isabella is quite right again and that are all well

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                       Decr  30th   1854

Dear Ellen,

You did not tell me how it was that Mother & Emily returned last night I thought they were to stay with the Gaskells after their visit at the Hollins.

I enjoyed my Christmas dinner at the Ashton Yates very much and they were all very friendly and pleasant. It was more of a party than I expected and the sd party was composed of the worthy hosts themselves and daughters at home (2). Mr & Mrs Louis, Dr Eyncourt Mr Captain D’Eyncourt who has commanded a man of war in the late Baltic expedition.  Mr & Mrs James Yates  Mr J McGregor MP for Glasgow  Mr & Mrs Cameron (he I think a relation of Mrs A) and your humble servant.  There was a good deal of conversation as you may suppose chiefly about the war and Mr McGregor has talking power equal to-I-should-not-to-estimate-how-many horses.  He was however very amusing and if there was rather too much of what his own self did and said on great and momentous questions & at critical times he had lots of anecdotes and was really a very clever man.  Meadows Martineau has sometime told me about him as he married a sister of Mrs Charles Martineau Meadow’s mother.  Captain D’Eyncourt is a quiet and perhaps rather a haughty man with a clear firm voice coming from between a beautiful pair of black moustachioed and a noble black beard. Mr Louis D’Eyncourt I should think a very pleasant & agreeable man.  He asked after my pursuits and his opinion was that tho’ there was a great pressure of candidates in the legal profession yet that there was a great deal of work to be done and not likely to be any diminution therein and also that the present time was rather unpleasant from being a period of change.  There were kind inquiries after all you.  I came to work again at chambers on Wednesday and Howard came the next day but friend Stone has not shewed up yet. However we are quite in harness again after an interval of 3 days.  The lectures do not begin till the 17th of next month and I shall have some time to read up one or two matters I want to do.  I have not seen any of my friends Thornely or Wills &c since Christmas  I do not suppose they have come to town yet.  I think altogether that judging from this first Christmas which I have spent in London that one need not be so very miserable here tho’ I confess coming home is much pleasanter than staying.  Are you going anywhere this holydays or have you any plans.  How are Grandmamma & Aunt. 

Give them my love and to all & believe me yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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[There is a gap between December and April. It seems likely that this was the time when Philip was thinking about,  and then converted,  to Roman Catholicism.  The family wrote to each other so regularly that I am sure that during this period many communications would have been exchanged on the subject.  However, both his parents and other friends and family were very disturbed by his conversion,  and it seems likely all letters on the subject were destroyed.  It is interesting to note here that we learn from much later correspondence that his sisters, after much deliberation, were baptised into the established church.]

 

                                                                           London                                                         April 21st  1855

Dear Emily

My time with Mr Braithwaite is now drawing quickly to a close indeed the 26th I believe is strictly speaking the last day.  I dare say he will ask me to stay a little longer with him but as I have had my full time with him I think I ought not to exceed more than a week so as just to finish what I have been lately engaged upon.  Barristers often ask their pupils to stay a little longer but from what I hear from others it is more as a compliment than anything else & is not often done unless in cases of particular friendship or connection.  I think that looking back on the last six months I have effected what I hoped for in regard to law and tho’ another subject has much occupied my thoughts and no doubt for about a month or 6 weeks prevented me giving my whole mind to my work at chambers I really think I have learned a good deal with Mr Braithwaite.  The good town of London has during the past week been turning out of doors and diverting to its very bustling life into a channel somewhat different from the ordinary one in order to do all honour to their Imperial Majesties our late visitors.  Their reception has certainly been a most imposing and unmistakable welcome and the extreme fineness of the weather has been very favourable to all the public out of doors displays. On Thursday morning I went with Thornely into St James Park to see them enter & return from Buckingham Palace on their way from Windsor to receive the city address. I scarcely saw the Empress who seems to have won all hearts by her kind gentle face & learning but I saw the Emperor very well.  They were in a closed carriage which was rather disappointing to many. This was all that I saw of them.  Heath & Thornely went to the Crystal Palace to see them.  The former is a season ticket holder & the latter had a shareholder’s ticket. 

On Sunday I went to see the Bow family and found only Mrs John Green at home tho’ Frank & Fanny came in afterwards.  Uncle John did not come in while I was there but he is at present at home.  They seemed all well.

I cannot exactly tell what day I shall have the pleasure of coming home.  The lectures as I have told you close on the 8th and I think that it will be somewhere about that time. I do not think I have any literary communications to make to you or anything indeed to say of “news”. I have been reading a little book lately which has pleased me very much “Fabiola or the Church of The Catacombs” an account of the Roman Church during the persecutions commenced by Dioclesian & followed up by Maximin.  It is by Cardinal Wiseman and gives a great deal of information and is beautifully written.  I have lent it to Meadows Martineau at present.  On Wednesday evening I met Mr & Mrs Leydon Lewis neither of whom I have seen for a considerable time. I saw in the Examiner last week an account of Mrs Jameson’s Book “Sisters of Charity. Catholic & Protestant”.  They spoke very well of it both as an interesting and as a fair book. I have not seen it myself.  Wills tells me he has heard that Mrs H Holland was too soon allowed to see company and that the excitement of visitors was the cause of the sad end of her short life. I wonder whether this is true.  It will be a mournful thing to think of for those who managed matters which from we heard was Lady Holland.  But I do not know how far accounts of this kind can be depended on.  I hope you have been all well enough to enjoy the bright pleasant week of sunshine we had had.

With best love to all   

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                          June 2nd   1855

Dear Mother

I am sure I did not forget last Monday was your birthday and tho’ I could not write on Sunday as there was no post I thought of you a great deal on Monday.  I hope you will go to the seaside somewhere if you feel that it will do you good and I am sure a little blow at some lively pleasant bathing place if any such are to be found will not fail in doing something towards setting you up.  This week we have had quite a return of the cold wet weather and so my complaints of being over-weighted in under garments were rather premature. I went and saw Dr Powell the day after I arrived here and had a consultation with him about my ailings. He acknowledged that the glands were rather swollen but thought they were better than they were some time ago and that nothing could be done better than bathing them in brine which I have not neglected to do.  As to the other I am sorry to say that your opinion was pronounced correct and that the bare place tho’ originally owing to the cause I mentioned is now clearly a case of ringworm.  I hope I have not given it to anyone at home but it will be well to be on the look out.  He has given me some lotion for it corrosive […] which he said would be quite effectual and I think it is much better already.  I shall go again to see him tomorrow or the next day.  I called to see Anna last night (I called before but she was not in) and found her flourishing and I should think enjoying herself but I dare say she will have written a full account of her proceedings.  I have not yet heard anything more about Sir J Romilly’s son but I know Mr Case has asked Mr Key to speak again about it and I expect I shall hear by tomorrow.  I will let you know as soon as I know anything decisive myself.  My occupation this week has chiefly been reading law. There are several books and very useful & necessary ones which I shall be glad to have some time to read and which I was not able to find time for while I was at Mr B’s.  I have not been to see him yet but I shall go soon & remove some books which I left there.  Anna says she saw J Thornely at the Princess Theatre on Thursday night with his Aunt & sister but I have not seen any of my young friends except Wills.  I hope I shall spend a useful & profitable three months as I quite agree with what you say in your letter that time is flying with me.  I feel it very much.

Allowing all that can be said in favour of this war as being just as necessary to be true still the slaughter & loss of life that is going on is really fearful. I must say that Mr Gladstone’s speech made a great impression on me and I think he proved satisfactorily that all the objects for which we went to war have been attained.  It seems as if in war we were led on step by step to attempt far more & demand far more than we thought of at first.  It gradually becomes a point of honour instead of necessity to gain some great success nothing will satisfy public impatience & expectation but some great disaster inflicted on the enemy which is an object quite separate from repelling aggression.  I know it may be said that our course in the Black Sea is the best calculated to prevent aggression for the future & so to anticipate the possible causes & origins of future wars but I cannot say this has been clearly made out. 

I do not think I have anything very particular to tell of myself but I know you will say that such a speech is uncalled  for and that I ought always to have plenty to tell of myself.  I am sure I always do try to tell you what I am feeling and if I do not I suppose it is my nature which is not so free of expression as some are.  I hope all the London visits will turn out well & happily

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                            June 7th 1855

Dear Mother

As I have now heard definitely tho’ I am sorry to say unfavourably in regard to Sir J Romilly’s son I write to let you hear the result.   Prof. Key hears from his Honor that he has made a satisfactory and for the present a permanent arrangement for the tuition of his son.  This was some time ago now indeed it must have taken place just about the time I first heard that he was not yet settled.  I am sorry it has turned out as it has done but Prof. Key tho’ a very kind & obliging man is rather forgetful & wanting in promptness.

In regard to the other matter about which you wrote I really think there is an improvement. Dr Powell thought so too and I assure you that in general health I feel as well & sound in every way as can be.  I think the brine does my neck good.  If you would really like & think it advisable to spend a fortnight at Llandudno in the autumn I am sure I should be very glad to go with you.  I think a stay there would be quite enjoyable and a few dips in the salt ocean good for us all.  You do not perhaps know how much the tickets for the Princess Theatre have been bought up.  I believe it is now difficult to get any for sometime to come.  I will do what I can if Emily  & Annie wish to see Henry VIII but I am afraid that unless I knew some time beforehand what night exactly they would go it will not be very easy to manage.   I am going to call in Keppel Street this evening I daresay you have heard of their safe arrival.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/13     [Ref: JA/JPG/46]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                          June 9th    1855

Dear Father

I suppose now you have parted company with your young charges and have a house at all events as quiet as well maybe.  I will go & meet Emily & Annie on Monday on their arrival as it will be perhaps easier for them if I do so.  I have not seen any paper this morning but there was a rumour last evening (not mentioned in the evening papers) that the allied troops have entered the outer lines of Sebastopol.  I do not exactly know what this may denote but following close on the intelligence that the bombardment had recommenced it may be that some important success has been achieved.  There was a call to the bar at the Middle Temple on Wednesday at which I was present. I knew two out of the six candidates for forensic distinction and so celebrated the occasion in due & becoming solemnity and rejoicing.  I do not think there are so many called to the bar now as used to be called about 5 or 6 years ago but I do not know whether this may not be owing to a diminution in the number of the merely “ornamental” which the requisite of attending lectures or passing an examination has brought about.  I do not think there is anything in the new system which can in any way stand in the way of those who really think of making the law their profession.  Have you made arrangements for having the Evening Mail last and sending it on to me ?  if so I shall be very glad as I have been buying it and if you can conveniently let me have it regularly it will dispense with my getting it and answer my purpose quite as well.  I think if I remember right you do not think of coming this way till the latter part of July.  I rather think Mr Stansfeld may be away and if so you might easily if you like or want to do so stay in the Provost Road a night or two. Indeed even if he is at home this summer weather I dare say we might manage very well.  When you are so far on your way southwards as Maidstone why should you not push over the briny sea and visit the metropolis of our brethren in arms or the rivals in arts to adopt the recognised antithesis.  You have never been in Paris and if you thought it at all prudent in the purest aspect of our affairs I think you would not find it so very expensive.  I fancy the outcry about high prices has been exaggerated as it always is.  As you read the same medium of public intelligence as I myself do you will know quite as much about the “Exposition” as I do.  I think the Exposition des beaux arts is very fine. The picture in the Academy by the young painter Leighton which the queen has bought I admire very much indeed but I do not think Anna quite agrees with me.  I did not go with her then as I had been before they came to London.  The book I am most engaged upon at present is White & Tudors Leading Cases in Equity which the reader in Equity very strongly recommended and indeed he always makes it a part of  his examination.  It is very full and I have found it very instructive. 

Chas Murch was called this week. He is a member of the Inner Temple. I do not see much of him.

With best love

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/13     [Ref: JA/JPG/47]

                                                                                  London                                                   June 19th 1855

Dear Mother

I hope the household is in a better way now than it was some time ago the last letter from Ellen to Anne which I saw on Saturday was more encouraging but I am afraid you have had rather a bustling anxious close of the half year. I had a note on Friday from Mr Hy Jackson asking me to go & spend Sunday at Barnes & stay the night there .  I called on him at his chambers in Lincoln’s Inn on the Saturday and gave a personal answer to his invitation.  I like him very much and hope I shall see him again in the course of time.  I think Emily & Annie have been very much pleased with him. He is so ready to open out & talk and has it seems to me a very well stored & cultivated mind. He talks of going round to sessions for a year or two after he has been called to gain a little practise in speaking and I know several who have done the same.  The only objection to it is that it takes one away from London and the chance of clients there and is a considerable expense though I suppose there is no absolute necessity for him to take an active part in the profession he seems quite to have the intention of doing so and I think quite rightly.  I believe people are much happier and get through more work of other kinds too if they have some regular obligatory employment.  Emily & Annie are quite enjoying themselves and yesterday morning I returned with them to town in the omnibus they being bound for Made Martha Groom.  There is no difficulty in reaching town by the omnibus and the time taken up does not much exceed an hour.  I am just setting out for the library at the Middle Temple where I shall pass most of the day. I hope Anna will not feel lonely but no doubt there will be a difference in living by herself & in having Aunt & Katherine to support her.  I am much obliged to you for sending the newspaper regularly.  The plan will do for me very well & I hope that you have time to see it.  I feel myself at present that there is some difficulty in getting through so much work each day as when I was in chambers.  Tho’ there is the lecture yet somehow I feel a greater temptation to be listless and desultory but of course I try to resist this as much as possible for it will never do on any account.  I do not mean that I am idle but there is a desire to look into different books and subjects rather than to keep to those which lie before me and are necessary and not merely matter of curiosity.  I believe Aunt Powell has returned from Sidmouth but I have not yet seen her.  Mr Frank Thornely will be married next week at Warwick to Miss Heath & I think most who know both parties regard him as a fortunate man.   Also Mr David Martineau of Tulse Hill is about to be married shortly to one of the Miss Scotts of Stourbridge so that with one marriage or the other almost all my young male friends will be taken up. David Martineau is a cousin of my friend Meadows.  I met Harry Holland in the Temple the other day. He looked changed but greeted me kindly and asked what I was doing. Miss Holland is pretty well he said. He told me that if he had to choose his time again he should have adopted Equity & Conveyancing as he thinks the Common Law Branch of the profession is not nearly so good an opening at present.  From all I hear I think this is so but it may have the effect of course of attracting a great number of the former branch.  I hope your next letter will tell me that you are all well and more comfortable in all respects.

With best love 

Yours very affectionately

 John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                         July 21st  1855

Dear Mother

I am afraid that the absorbing nature of the intelligence which has formed the object of my letters lately has allowed much room for other matter.  I still like my change of abode and do not expect any evil effects from the river.  I am glad to see by the paper this morning that after five years from next December the Thames will no longer be polluted in the way it now is but that London is to have the advantage which it has by nature a pure and plentiful river flowing through its midst.  Richd Hutton is living in chambers in the Temple now and the other evening I went to call upon him.  I have not been seeing any one lately except the Ashton Yates on whom I called last Sunday. Mr A and one of the Miss were intending to set off for Ireland the next day on a visit to Mrs Musgrave and will be absent some time.  I feel to be spending my time usefully and profitably & tho’ one always thinks that more might have been effected I do not know how I could be doing better than I am.       I have not yet fixed anything for October.    I shall have a talk with Wm Fowler one of the Quakers I knew at University College who is getting on at the bar very well indeed and would be a very good person to ask advice of as to whom to read with.  It is pleasant being able to see Wills and Martineau whenever I like.  I generally go out before they are here in the morning and do not return till after they leave but still I can always stay till they come.  I suppose you have had Sydney Smith’s life in the society. I have read several reviews of the book which have spoken very well of it. Sydney Smith himself had such an union of qualities which command success in life and are so sure to conciliate popular favour to their possessor that the interest felt in his biography does not cause surprise.   But in spite of the constant cheerfulness and genial temperament which he no doubt possessed & made his home and society so pleasant and in spite of the clear insight and undistorted judgment which exposed so many shams & untrue pretences I have not discovered any indications of sensibility to the higher aims of Christian excellence & the aspect of renunciation which they involved. 

I hope you will go somewhere these holydays. I am sure it is much better for all to have a change of scene now and then particularly when life is one of comparatively little variety. I suppose the Longs are all returned from the Lakes. I do not think it is likely I shall go anywhere this autumn except home which is in fact a complete change for me and which I am sure I enjoy as much as anywhere. I dare say it will not be till nearly the end of August that I shall leave London. The lectures will close before that time but I do not think I shall leave till the time I mention.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/13     [Ref: JA/JPG/49]

 

                                                            London                                                           July 28th 1855

Dear Father

Mr Ryan called here the other day but as it was the middle of the day I was away. I wrote asking him to call Thursday evening as I thought he might want to hear something or ask something. I told him he would have to take charge of Charley Powell* and that I thought the school opened next week but that I would write and let him know next Monday.   I hope he will be satisfactory to you as the first interview I had with him and the account Mr Woodman gave disposed to think he would at least more so than any other I had met with. I shall be curious to hear what he does turn out. I could just fancy it would be as well not to be too familiar & easy with him at first as I think he has a fair opinion of himself but really I hardly like to prejudge you in his regard either one way or the other.  I have been hoping sincerely all this week that your visit to Derbyshire has not had to suffer from the profuse rain we have had here.  Today it has quite cleared off & promises to be fine but the steady wet of the last week has made me often think how you were faring.  Bright showery weather is not unpleasant but steady wet is damping to the spirits as well as the skin.  As the “colony” here in Harcourt Buildings take the Times I think I need not trouble you to send the Evening Mail but if there is anything important which I should like to keep I will let you know. Tomorrow I am going to dine with the Asplands.  Last Sunday I called at the James’ in Wimpole Street.  Mr James was out but I saw Mrs James who was kind in her inquiries & manner. I have not been at all at the house this year however one cannot always expect that in London where people are so busy and have so many acquaintances they must keep up.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

Let me know on Monday when the school opens that I may write to Mr Ryan

*[Son of Henry’s sister Emily]

JRL Box 2/13     [Ref: JA/JPG/50]

 

                                                            Temple                                                           August 1st /55

Dear Mother

I have arranged about Mr Ryan & Charlie Powell and they will arrive tomorrow by the 10 o’clock train from London.  I shall go to the station and introduce them to one another or rather put the latter of them in charge of the former.  The offer which the Miss Yates’ have made is a very kind one indeed and I am sure we shall feel grateful for the help it will be.  I do not hear much of what Harry’s plans are but Aunt told me that Mr Jas. Powell had thought it would be a very good thing for him to prepare himself for the examination for the civil service in India.  He has time enough as he is too young by some years to compete.

I had a pleasant afternoon and evening at the Asplands on Sunday Tom Harvey was there and several people called in the evening. J Harvey is I think very comfortably settled with Mr Parker and from his conversation and the account he gives me he is evidently working hard and with a taste and capacity for his business.  I think tho’ I do not know Enoch very well that Tomkas quite the best abilities of any of the Harvey family. I have not yet settled what to do in October. Fowler seems not in all respects to recommend Mr Corte with whom he read as he is such an old fashioned practitioner.  J Roget as I think I told was with a brother of Prof. De Morgan who is a conveyancer and I find yesterday that James Thornely also read with him.  The Newcomers has come to a close today in perhaps rather an abrupt way but it is really a very beautiful number with a genuine pathos in parts which the author does not often manifest or if he does qualifies it with what is disagreeable mocking. I was tempted to purchase the collection of the Times correspondents letters from the seat of war in the East and then it struck me that perhaps my father has bought them and that at any rate it is worth while mentioning as soon as possible that I have got them.  I think it will be interesting work so far as the war itself is interesting to read again a connected account of it.

The Asplands will be leaving town soon for the North.    Mrs A & the children were much better for their stay in the neighbouring county of Essex or Middlesex I forget which (if the latter of course not neighbouring) They were all very kind and pleasant.

I am working away and am quite well.  I do not find that my hair comes off so much now nearly as it did and the worst part has I think been stopped long ago.  I have not yet got any shirts but shall before long.  There are at least seven that are wearable tho’ a little the worse for wear.  I have some very nice woollen waistcoats not so thick as the others.

Believe me dear Mother

Yours very affectionately

 John Philip Green

JRL Box 2/13     [Ref: JA/JPG/51]

                                                                           London                                                      August 13th 1855

Dear Mother

I am sorry that I have let so long a time elapse without writing but I did not think that it was so long as it was.  I need not say that your anxiety about my health has no ground for being aroused. I saw the Powells* a day or two before their removal when they were quite in the bustle of it.  They had just had a communication from Alderman Wire about the presentation to Christ Church for Edward but had not had a decided offer of it so that your letter was first intelligence I had of the matter being finally decided.  Though my last letter necessarily contained something about Mr Ryan and Charlie yet I had the impression that there was something besides you do not say anything about him which makes me think that you do not altogether like him or find him suitable to your purposes.  I think I shall return home before the end of this month as the place is very dull hardly anyone here and I think I can do what I have to do in the way of reading very nearly as well at home.  I have not yet decided who to read with after the summer vacation really there is no hurry about it and I do not know that there is any advantage in settling the matter very long before I am ready to go. At present I incline to Mr Coote whose name I think I mentioned to you. Thornely & A Holt went on Saturday to Paris for a stay of 10 days or a fortnight. They will be there during the Queens visit and no doubt will scarcely notice that they are in a foreign city so many English faces & ejaculations will present themselves at all hands.  Wills has come back to chambers after the labours of the Midland circuit.  He had some briefs to defend.  Lieut. Austin who you may remember was Governor of the Birmingham Gaol and made use of modes of prison discipline which were not authorised by the law and were by the public & the commissioners appointed to examine into the matter considered unnecessarily cruel and harsh.  A long interval has elapsed before Lieut. Austin was put upon trial for the charges made against him and certainly if all his offence is what appears in evidence I think public opinion and the commission were unduly severe upon him.  One of the facts which seemed so shocking the suicides among the prisoners subjected to the discipline ordered by him have it appears continued during the administration of his successor when the cause to which they were formerly attributed has ceased to exist.  I was very glad to see Willy Powell so successful at the school for the final year he has spent there. I saw him the evening I was at the Powells and with his prizes.  I always thought from the little I saw of him that he must have very good mental powers and tho’ rather shy he is a very pleasant boy to speak to and have any thing to do with. I do think it is hard for [sic] Mr Saner with his (reported) £60,000 and all his family well & prosperously settled in the world to insist upon the Powells paying his annuity.  I am sure it was never thought at the time that it would continue at any rate beyond Dr Powell’s life or indeed so long as it has done. You probably know as much of their affairs as I do as no doubt Aunt Mardon or Powell has told you the same as they told me. I did not forget dear Emily’s birth day tho’ it was a silent remembrance a poor evidence you will say of my affection.  Was it 6lbs of tea you want. I am not sure that I have the letter in which you mentioned it before.  If you want the eye glasses I shall be very glad to do anything for you I can. I shall I think want some more money but I will let you know again. I did pay for Mr Ryan’s journey. How is dear Grandmother now and is Aunt Anna come home again

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

*[Emily Jane Green married Henry Powell in 1836. Henry came from a non conformist and medical background originating in Kent and Chichester. He was apprenticed to James Saner in 1822 and gained his MRCS from Edinburgh in 1829 after which he practised in Whitechapel before going into partnership with Saner at 36 Finsbury Square.  He died suddenly aged 48 in June 1855 and thereafter Emily Jane lived with her sister Ann Mardon. . They had one daughter Emily and six sons. Emily was educated at the school of her aunts Elizabeth & Louisa Green in Maidstone. Sadly she was admitted to a mental institution and was detained there until her death at 90. Henry was a solicitor, William was a doctor in Torquay, Thomas went to the Cape and died there, Charles Saner became a tea merchant in Amoy China, and it was his daughter to married Arthur Tanner,  Edward first went to Cape Town in 1867 but returned by 1871 and then later went to New Zealand and Alfred Septimus was in the cotton industry.]

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                                                                           London                                                        August 18th /55

Dear Father

I am afraid it was not quite “en regle” not to acknowledge the receipt of the packet of deeds* which you sent however they arrived all safe and the same day I took them to the office of the Widows Fund. They wished them left for the solicitor of the Company to inspect and so Mr Cox gave me a receipt for them and they will be ready to be returned towards the end of next week as the solicitor will not call before Thursday.  Mr Cox seemed to think the matter all plain & straight forward enough. Mrs Woolley does not seem to have been long a contributor of premium in consideration of her insurance but I am glad there has not been any difficulty about the matter for my Grandfather or for you.  I do not see any thing in the way of my coming home at the end of next week or the beginning of the following and so you may consider that to be the time of my visit. I had a call from Robert Holland this morning with a black leather bag with which as he said he was going marketing in the Borough Market.  It certainly is the way of conveying vegetable marrows and peas and cucumbers which is least likely to betray a young man’s errand.  We read in Lt. Hardwicke’s life that when he was in an attorney’s office in London where he was rather supported by his master that the wife used to send him for vegetables to Covent Garden Market till increasing years and sense of the becoming led him to charge “cab hire to & from Covent Garden” in his accounts with his master and this made the good lady feel that to employ the young lawyer was not the most economical way of conveyance for the necessary vegetable supplies.  Holland was quite pleased with my location and with the quick observation with which he is gifted and called forth by his present life he told me more about the contents of the room and the various pictorial & zoological trophies with which it is furnished than I had noticed in 6 weeks time.  Wills is not here very much in the day as he generally takes his wife out a walk in the afternoon and indeed there is little occasion for a lawyer to be at chambers.  The bustle of lawyers in term time has now subsided into perfect calm & most of them are no doubt in Switzerland Paris or forgetting pleas & […] in the noble ambition of winging the tribes of air and filling their bags with blackcock instead of with briefs.  If it would be of service to you that I should be at home by Saturday I would do so but I rather want to see and settle some matter with Meadows Martineau who does not return till the Friday and it is uncertain whether he will make his appearance at chambers the first day. 

There is some news in the Paper this morning which perhaps you will not hear before my letter reaches you that the Russians under Liprandi attacked the allied position along the Tchernayne on the 18th but were repulsed with great loss or as the English account says with a loss of 4.000 or 5.000.  None of our troops were engaged but only the Sardinians & French.  I dare say the Sardinians were glad of the change which active service must cause in the spirits of soldiers.  It must have been very tedious work not to be called to take any important or responsible part in the operation and to see a large portion of their force cut off or debilitated by cholera and sickness.  Another dispatch is from Gen. Simpson to the effect that he & Pelissier had determined to open fire again that day (the 18th ) along the whole line.

The weather is very warm and the river a little oppressive but Robert Holland does not think sulphurette & hydrogen has any bad effect on the human system and that the river is not really hurtful to health.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

Tell Annie that I have got her music from Mrs Groom

*[In 1808 Henry’s father John,  and his brothers Samuel and William,  inherited property in Thurnham in Kent from their Uncle Samuel Jones. Sam Jones also left £1000 to be invested in 3% consols the interest from which was to go to them and thereafter to their children and their children’s children.  John Green was the last surviving executor of the will,  and on his death Henry was obliged to take over the role.  The problem on which he asked John Philip to get advice was that William had his daughter had taken out a mortgage against their share of the money to aid his son, this was not allowed under the terms of the will but had obviously taken place without John’s knowledge.  William had now got into difficulties with repayments on the mortgage and wanted to have his share of the money – however Henry could not agree to this without the consent of all the parties concerned.  Henry kept a letter book containing his side of all the correspondence which continued well into the 1860s – see appendix B]

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                                                                           London                                                      August 20th 1855

Dear Father

I find that I shall want as much as £20 to settle what I owe and to get some clothes and a hat &c  I am sorry it is so large a sum. I suppose I had better bring back the deeds if I get them from the Widows Fund Office or will there be any necessity for them to remain here for any further inspection.  I should think not as far as I understand the matter.  You may expect me I think on Saturday if you can conveniently let me have the money on Friday morning. I had quite a disappointment yesterday afternoon.  I thought I should like to see Kew Gardens for once this year and so embarked on a steamer but at Chelsea we had to wait an hour & a half for another boat and as the tide was unfavourable we did not arrive at Kew till six and there was scarcely time to reach the gardens at all and I could only get a hurried walk through part of them.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                       August 22nd  /55

Dear Mother

I received your letter safely with the enclosed order on Williams & Co for which I am thankful  to you.  I will attend to the things you mention in your letter before I leave and as to my hair I feel sure it is now all right. When I spoke of it before I meant only that it had not ceased coming off but at present the quantity that comes off is much less than it has been for a long time. I cannot detect any remains of bare places and feel sure that there is nothing more to fear on this account.  I still however occasionally use the lotion.  I quite feel that I have no right to apply allowances which I have from you to purposes other than those for which they were intended and necessary to myself. I have felt this for some time past and except some books which perhaps I should not otherwise have purchased (an expense which will not occur again) and the necessary contribution to public worship I do not think I have incurred any expenditure on this head.  I should I think prefer coming on Monday to coming on Saturday as you say that there will not be any difficulty at home but I beg that if there will be any inconvenience that you will let me know for it is a matter almost tho’ I cannot say quite indifferent to me.  I have not Bradshaws’ Guide so cannot tell now what train I shall probably travel by but when I have fixed I will let you know again

With best love

Your’s very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            Birmingham                                               August 25th   /55

Dear Mother

You will perhaps be surprised to see me dating from Birmingham but I thought I should like very much to call on Dr Newman and as Birmingham is not much out of my way on my journey northwards I have put up here for a night or two.  I have only just arrived & have not had time to look about me but I have taken up my abode at a very nice pleasant little inn about a mile out of Birmingham & near Edgbaston which Wills recommended to me.  All the inns from what I hear are quite full with people coming to the Musical Festival which begins next Monday.  Greenhow is staying here at the Rob. Martineau’s and tomorrow I shall call upon him.  I shall at any rate come home on Monday morning and by a train which arrives at Chelford at 1.45 that seems to be the one which will be most likely to fall in the best with my dear sister’s plan of coming to meet me on my way from Chelford.  We have had a very heavy rain here but the evening is very fresh after it and Edgbaston seems from a passing glance quite a pleasant suburb.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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The Road to Chelford

 

 

 

                                                                           Oxford                                                             Octr 14th   /55

Dear Mother

I am sorry to have given you the trouble of forwarding my scissors but I shall be very glad to have them. I am enjoying my visit to this ancient University very much. I am not living in the college but Thorley (who is very kind and obliging in every way) engaged me a room almost opposite Wadham College to sleep in.  Most of today we have been walking about the place and seen I think almost every college of any importance and I did not know till we returned that the dinner hour today was at 5 ¼ which only leaves me a few minutes to sit down to write whereas I hoped to have time for a proper letter.  I will try & find time this evening or in the morning before leaving to write more fully.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Oxford                                                             Oct 15th   /55

Dear Mother

I hope you received the letter I wrote yesterday which I wrote in good time tho’ I had some fears that it was not put into the post in good time.  Wadham College is not one of the most ancient of the Oxford Colleges but it is a very compact and pleasant place and Thorley’s rooms are very comfortable and cheerful.  About five on both days I dined in hall at the fellows’ table at which were present the sub.warden and two fellows besides Thorley.  The scholars & undergraduates dined at tables along the hall which is a fine one with a dark oak roof and pictures of the eminent men in various provinces of human activity whom the college has produced.  The fellows were very pleasant easy men and not formidable at all one of them of the name of Ross a very odd man who lives almost a hermit life in regard to solitude and is learned in almost all sciences especially oriental language.  After dinner in the common room (to which we ascended by a rather awkward winding stair which is a pretty good evidence that the fellows do not indulge very much in various excitements as persons in such a stale world find considerable difficulty in ascending & descending) the same individual Ross poured himself forth in continuous talk which was very curious and often very funny.  He was really rather an oddity in spite of his great learning.  This morning Thorley is engaged with his classes and so I am writing this in the Union a sort of literary club to which he brought me.  Yesterday after the morning I was chiefly engaged in walking about with him and seeing the various buildings & gardens attached to them.  The college gardens are often a great part of the charm of these places and just at this time they are looking very well.  A very frequent ornament on the college walls is a large virginia creeper which I dare say you admire very much.  I did not go to service at any of the chapels but saw one or two of them just before the service began.  Merton and Magdalen have both of them very beautiful Chapels.  The latter college has had large additions made to it & a gateway designed by Pugin.  I have not attempted to see Miss Chapman as I have not her address and do not know that it would particularly admirable to do so.  Thorley had several men from other colleges yesterday morning to breakfast with him one of the name of Brydges a fellow of Oriel whom I liked very much and Stowe a scholar of Wadham & brother of Stowe who was an agent of the Times & correspondent in the Crimea & whose untimely death was mentioned a little while ago.  I shall leave for town this afternoon so that any letters may after this be sent there for me. I am glad to say that I have not had any trouble with my cold which has entirely passed off.  It would have been a very unpleasant visitant on such an occasion.  There is a good deal of building and restoration going on in several of the colleges and altogether from what I can learn a much more active & stirring spirit abroad in Oxford than that which prevailed thirty or forty years ago.

Goodbye dear mother & may God bless you all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                               Oct 17th /55

Dear Mother

I am writing a few lines as perhaps you will be glad to hear that I accomplished the second stage of my journey in safety.  On my arrival here on Thames Bank as you say I found the fire blazing brightly & the chambers bearing a more cheerful appearance than a solitary abode might be expected to do to any one who has been living for some weeks in a household of people.  The eggs happily survived their transit unfractured and owing to the absence of friend Maximilian I seem likely to have to consume them myself. In regard to Westward Ho you have decidedly been excessive in your imagination. The simple fact was that Mr Siddeley called my attention to the book & as I thought I might have time to read it and that at any rate some at home might wish to read it I brought it with me. However I did not find that just the last day before my departure it would be convenient to read a 3 vol book and as at 10 in the evening when I looked for the first volume I presumed from not seeing the book about that some one had taken it upstairs with them I gave up thoughts of reading it.  I did not think it would be worth while to make any push to read the book as in regard to matters of history I prefer the facts which sober writers inform us of as the result of their investigation rather than fictitious representations however brilliant and admirable in the incidental details. Several things which I read in the second volume would be considerably neutralised or explained by any history of character.  The only person at chambers is Meadows who returned from his Kent sojourn yesterday.  Greenhow & Wills are at sessions and will return at the end of the week. The latter has been having trouble with his servants two of whom gave him notice during his absence in Yorkshire and so you would not have stood alone among persons of my acquaintance had your anticipated change come to pass.  I have not seen anyone yet except a few of my young friends.  I will not forget about the will but will see to it as soon as ever I can as also my own arrangements for the next period of time.  About the money I shall I think have quite enough and when I spoke to my father I did not mean that I had not plenty for some time but only that I might want some. A quarters’ rent here and my dinner account for the past year and lectures fees for the ensuing year will of course make some hole into what I now have but I shall have enough after these are settled. We shall soon be in the midst of early darkness in the afternoons as in London the fine October days which are so enjoyable in the country are too often obscured by fogs.  I dare say you have had very pleasant weather (except one day) since I left.  London wears its usual face of bustle & care & hurry but after a few days it ceases to excite our notice and I shall be one of its working ingredients again & go to make part of its aspect. Where is Harry Powell now if I knew I would write to tell that just at present he had better call in the morning if he would be sure of my being at chambers.

With best love

John Philip Green

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London                                                               Oct 20th /55

Dear Father

I went this morning to the Widows Fund Office and find that if I attend at 3 on Thursday I shall receive the £100 which of course I shall invest without delay.  Mr Cox says that he shall be much obliged by having the date of the probate of my grandfather’s will (as proved on &c sworn under &c) as he has mislaid the copy which he had 3 months ago. Perhaps as it is not a long will you might send a copy of it so that all may be right on Thursday but of course it is Mr Cox’s fault for not having taken care of the copy which he had when the instrument was left with him.  The newspaper I shall pay for tonight or as soon as I am in that part of the town.  I wrote to my grandmother Brandreth this afternoon and sent a copy of the will as altered by the suggestions I have received but the substance is exactly the same. I have determined to go to Mr Braithwait again and settled the matter this morning with him so that on Monday you may address me at No.3  New Square once more. I inquired about Mr Corte and from what I hear he is rather too old to read with, not that his powers are impaired but he is less active and does not much care for pupils now also he does not settle dress with his pupils which is a great disadvantage.  On the whole from what I hear from my different friends who have read with conveyancers Mr Braithwaite is as satisfactory a master as I shall easily find and as that is the case having already read with him is a reason for going again there will be no risk which there would be in going to a new man.  I think it will even now be better to direct to me at Mr B’s as the post does not always arrive here so soon as I should want to go out.

With best love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

Tell my grandmother to put her name immediately at the end in the space between the last line and  the part beginning “signed by the &c then In witness whereof &c this ---day of October AB 1855                               (testatrix’s signature)

Signed by the said testatrix as her last will &c &c

(witnesses’ signature)

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                                                                           London                                                          Oct 22nd  1855

Dear Mother

The will as to the question you raise is I am sure quite right. If you will read it again you will I think see that the £500 is only to be a charge at all in the event of Anna* surviving. If this does not happen there will be according to the form I have used no charge at all. Perhaps the exception of the £500 from the subsequent gift is so over cautious in this respect that it leads to a supposition of a doubt. But  I truly believe that the will as it is now expresses what is intended at least so far as I understand what is intended. I have been all day at Mr Braithwaite, and just at present there is a good deal of work in which awaits our labours upon it.  I am sorry to see this afternoon that Sir Wm Molesworth is dead as you have perhaps seen from the paper he has been in danger a day or two and the last account last night was that he was gradually sinking.  He was a very eminent statesman and taken away sooner than the nation can well afford to lose his talents and energy. I think as I said in my letter to my father yesterday that it will be better still to direct to New Square.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

*[Anna Brandreth died in 1864 when a new will was drawn]

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               London                                                               Oct 27th  /55

Dear Mother

Mr Romanie who as I dare say you know is our landlord at Harcourt Buildings has given us notice that he does not intend any longer to hold the Chambers from the Inner Temple Society.  Wills however does not think of leaving but of taking them himself and continuing the present arrangements.  He will have to buy the fixtures & most of the furniture from Mr Romanie and asked me through Martineau whether I should be willing to furnish the bed room for myself.  I do not feel that I shall be under any obligation to do so as I think the rent is quite enough to command a furnished room but still if it is at all probable that in a year or a year & a half I shall have to furnish for myself I may as well accommodate him by procuring some of the necessary articles for myself now. As it is of course uncertain whether I shall find it more advantageous hereafter to sleep where I have my room for the day or to get a bed room in another part of the town I should not of course think of getting many things.  The reason I write to ask you about the matter is that if there are any things at home that are not used now & not likely to be and that would come in for me I might as well avail myself of them.  If I have to get a bed stead I should of course get an iron one.  Is there that article or bedding that would do or any other of the articles of bedroom furniture.  There would not be much needed.  I have not however quite determined to do even so much as this and I said I would give an answer on Tuesday so if you can without much inconvenience let me have a few lines on Monday morning I shall be much obliged.  You will not I am afraid think this part of my letter very interesting.  We are going on very well at Mr B’s and hitherto there has been no lack of work.  I have been quite fully engaged during the week that I have been here I quite feel that I am becoming more familiar and “handy” at the work and after all conveyancing does not require very high intellectual capacity but perseverance and cautious & attentive use of certain forms of expression.  As to what you quote from Mr Kingsley’s book it is the expression of a sentiment to a certain extent right but not one with which I agree in the turn which is given to it there. It is quite clear from such passages as “what shall it profit a man to gain the whole world but lose his own soul” “Working out your salvation with fear and trembling” that to attain salvation ourselves is a direct moving principle of conduct & life that it is a chief motive and sanction to duty of every kind and that to contrast as things opposite the consideration of future joys with other motives (whatever they are) of obedience to the Divine will is idle declaration.  To say that this consideration of danger to the state of your own soul and anxiety as to what good state in the sight of God really is makes men cowards in the post of trial makes them afraid to die is quite ridiculous.  I dare say you may know that it did not deter that noble hearted man Campian from venturing into the lions mouth by coming to England at all at such time as he did.  He was put to the rack and after a trial which Hallam in his Constitutional History says was about as unfair as any in our history (which is saying a good deal). He was convicted of high treason on evidence that on legal principles ought not to be attended to at all.  Read his affecting trial & eloquent speech in the State Trials and then you will see whether a Jesuit is afraid to die.  In the history of that society you will find as noble instance of heroism as any either of ecclesiastical or profane history and certainly I for one should choose my heroes among them in preference to such buccaneering  adventurers  as Amyas Leigh and the like of them. (I am speaking now of what they are in history I have no doubt in Westward Ho they are endowed with all kinds of nobility). One thing I chanced to stumble upon in speaking incidentally of Pope Gregory XIII he adds the ugly remark “before he had eaten himself to death” what his authority for such a speech is I do not know certainly it was not for want of intellectual capacity and pursuits that led that pontiff to indulge in eating (if it was so) one thing we know of him that he reformed the calendar which  reform England was 140 years in adopting for the admirable reason that it was done by the pope.  The book seemed to me to be full of racy animal spirits nothing particularly elevating about it in a moral  point of view and certainly in its tone and mode of treating the subject matter one needing no particular great degree of courage to write & publish in the present state of sentiment in this country.  However I shall be going on at too great length so I will break off here & sending you all my best love

I remain  

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                              Oct 29th  /55

Dear Father

The last day or two I have had some doubts whether it will be the proper course merely to replace the sum of stock sold to my grandfather and not to give the benefit of the fall in the price of stock to the trust fund. The law is very strict as to the management of trust property and the principle is undoubted that a trustee is not allowed to make any profit out of a trust fund and that any accidental advantage which accrues from any mode of dealing with it must not go to him.  It is not enough to say that my grandfather ran the risk of having to replace the stock when its price might have risen. He did run that risk and that among other things made the proceeding improper and unsafe to himself. I asked Mr Braithwaite for his opinion on the point and he quite agreed with this view and thinks that the safest way will be not to have any advantage or benefit whatever from the management of trust property.  Trustees must invest their trust fund in the consolidated fund and keep it there unless the terms of the will or deed expressly allow investment on other security and then they will be safe. I have written to  Mr Wm Green to come on Friday that is to be at Messrs Sims & Hill on that day but I have not at all raised this question.  Before then I can have your opinion & perhaps speak again with Mr B.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                               Nov 3rd  /55

Dear Father

I dare say this morning you received the receipt of the Bank from Messrs Sims & Hill. They said they would send it.  I was not able to write to tell you of the investment having been completed.  I did not see the transfer made but it was to take place at ½ past 2 and as my presence was not needed to sign the book and as Messrs Sims & Hill gave me the ordinary memorandum on receiving the money there was not any occasion for me to stay.    Mr Wm Green was there and glad to see me & to hear of you.  When I first told him what I proposed doing he seemed to think it would be quite sufficient to replace £100 consol. stock but I pointed out to him that it would be right at least to reinvest the sums produced by the former sale which I understand was £94.  I have thought a good deal about the matter & feel sure that more than this the Trustee is not bound to do. The £100 the produce of the life policy is in no sense trust property. His receipt of that & his dealing with Mrs Woolley to secure the loan are not dealings with property subject to the trusts of the will under which he acts but a transaction quite independent & collateral.  The trust property actually dealt with was £94 the produce of the sale of the £100 consols  and if this £94 is reinvested at equal or lower rates then 94 per cent the trustee’s obligation legally & morally seems to me performed. This then is what I did I invested £94 of the £100 I received from the Assurance Office.  Your position as Executor of my grandfather is a trusteeship also and the £6  balance may legally & morally belong to his estate & you have not any right to act in the matter from any motive of mere generosity towards the Wm Greens.  The question however remains whether the £6 belongs to my grandfather’s or to Mrs Woolley’s estate and in reference to this we must look into the mortgage deed again.  I feel convinced it does not belong to the property administered under Uncle Jones’ will.  Mr Wm Green seemed to think that the balance would  belong to him because he had given up the interest of the consols to Mrs Woolley but I could not at all understand what he was aiming at or on what principle he came to such a conclusion.  He quite agreed with me that £94 was the right sum to invest Messrs Sims & Hill thought we were not bound to do more than buy £100 stock at present prices but this point I felt clear about.  When I told Mr Wm Green that the question as to who is entitled to the £6 still remains open it seemed to set him at rest and our whole interview was quite pleasant & friendly in every way.  One of the Miss Woolleys was present also.  As we are on legal matters I may ask you to tell Anna that the chief practical distinction between tenants in common & joint tents is that the shares of the former go to their heirs or executors on their deaths but that the shares of joint tenants dying go to the other or others of them if joint tenant may in his lifetime convey his share but if he does not it will go on his decease to his fellow joint tenant or joint tenants and his will will have no effect on it. There are other differences but this is the great leading one.  In the second volume of Blackston’s Commentaries she will find it more fully explained & in a manner I have no doubt she will understand.  I have not yet decided what to do as to furnishing as Wills was about to have a valuer & from his estimate determine whether he would not do it himself & I hope he will indeed.  I do not feel inclined to do it myself.  We have had a week of very disagreeable cold wet weather which I am happy to say has not affected me unpleasantly but has made me enjoy a bright fire in the evening with the greater rest.  We are going on very well in New Square. There are 4 pupils Stone & Howard who were there before Seebohn of Swedish origin & myself but up to this time there has been plenty to keep us all occupied.  Harry Powell* has not called for the parcel. I think I shall write him a note to Somerset House and ask him to come and see me at Chambers.  The courts began yesterday & the neighbourhood is once more enlivened by the gentlemen in horsehair making about from chambers to court & from one court to another in breathless haste & with some loss of dignity.  John Thornely seems well after his vacation rambles which have been in different quarters of that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland called England.  I hope you do not feel very tired. I am afraid you will but I am sure that if you can manage to have some pursuit that interests you besides it is much less tiresome & irksome. I have not been reading anything since I came here except matter of a very dry description & I think it will have to be so for the next year.  The reason I have put two stamps on sometimes is because my letter was just past ½ past 5 not because it was past ½ an ounce.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

*[Eldest son of Emily, Henry’s sister]

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                                                                           London                                                             Novr  7th /55

Dear Emily

I was sorry to hear that you have been poorly but as the same letter bore news of your being in a better way there was an element of consolation in the account.  I hope you are by this time “out of the feathers” & looking at faces in the fire or round the table.  The last important intelligence I have is that the gubernatorial Wills has been graciously moved to furnish his son’s chambers bed room and all & that the quartet of legal abilities will sit en permanence at No.4 for some indefinite period.  One of them will “lie” there indeed not professionally perhaps but physically.  A young lady of your reading will of course not forget that I have been anticipating in getting double service out of the word by no less a person than Sir H Wotton who defined ambassadors as persons sent to lie abroad for the benefit of their country.  I have during this day been devoting my energies to providing a happy home (by means of a marriage settlement) for the Revd H Heylar  Miss Harriet Swete (qy how long since sweet?) so that you can amuse yourself by looking at their advertised union about the 21st.   Before at Mr B’s we were always glad to see that the event for which we had been so long preparing had really come off and sometime we were afraid from not seeing the well known names in the looked for place that some unhappy incident had frustrated our well meant exertions. Perhaps the respective patres familias were not able to bring themselves to make the necessary enunciations of lands & goods in favour of their children or the sordid minded bridegroom tried to make too good terms for himself or according  to the gentler language of the instructions “such an arrangement will scarcely be considered free from difficulties by the gentleman’s solicitor”.  I have been looking through the snob papers again which first appeared in Punch & now are collected and really they are very amusing.  The author does not seem to have great respect for the nestor of Equity Lord Eldon in fact he is so unceremonious as to call him a sordid old snob language which I think ought to call down the ire of the Bench of the Middle Temple of which society the said author is an ancient but inactive member.  Mr B who has not a wide or deep acquaintance with the light literature of the day (in fact I think he is like Mr Ranville Ranville who reads Elucydides in the holydays & does not quote any less serious work than Cicero De Senectute  giggles very deep down when I repeated to him the treasonable & malicious dictum.  It was not apropos of nothing that I introduced the citation but apropos of a silver tankard which is one of the heir looms in the Eldon family & was presented in 27 by that great & good Monarch Geogio quartus to his trusty & well beloved cousin on his retirement from the scenes which had known him so long.

Mr B said that he never thought Ld Eldon had a very powerful head nothing like (whom do you think?)

Napoleon & Julius Caeser.  I saw the Taylers the other evening and saw Hannah’s sketches which I liked very much.  The scenery of Normandy must in many respects have great similarity to many parts of England.  There were also some engravings of those wonderful Norman Churches which perhaps after all are the “great things” of the land.  Tell Annie I was much obliged to her for her letter & would have written to her but I was so vain as to think that you would like a letter from me.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                 London                                                           Novr19th /55

Dear Mother

I intended to write on Saturday but have the invariable excuse to urge viz the exacting J B.B. at whose side I was a close prisoner during the whole of that day.  I am very sorry to hear that you have been so anxious about dear Emily.  By not hearing for nearly a week I concluded she was getting to look like herself again.  I trust that the sea side will restore we can perhaps hardly say the roses to her cheeks but at any rate her usual looks and will reinvigorate her after her illness.  You will feel more retired and quiet than ever without even the girls in the evening to awaken the tones of our beneficent friend the piano or to fill the round table except about two yards on the fireside of it.  I do not think I have seen anyone that you know. Of course I cannot call during the day & at present I have law classes almost every evening which prevent me going out then & indeed the evening is not a common time to call unless by invitation.  On Sundays again times do not suit very well. Yesterday I intended to go to see the Yates but it was so damp that I did not wish to risk increasing a little cold I have by going out a second time.  However I will do so as soon as I can.  I think of asking John Roget to spend some evening with me soon.  I see him now & then and I have called to see him once or twice at his chambers in Chancery Lane.  You must not think by this account that I am leading a very solitary life as I often see young friends about the temple.   J Thornely sometimes calls for me at dinner time and Mr Rolston my friend of the catalogues come to see me.  Marshall called on me one evening and we went to Julliene’s concert together.  And then my friends in calf skin binding are always at home waiting for me to converse with them.  I am afraid I can hardly say of them that they are “not harsh & cribbed as dull fools suppose, but musical as is Apollo’s lute” but they are not so dull after all.  In my opinion they are much more interesting than dried plants or funguses but you will perhaps think this rather an equivocal praise.  I think I told you I saw Murland & J Grundy at the Hall.  They were looking very well & happy.  I am finishing my note at chambers where I found a note from Ellen giving a pleasant account of the party generally.  They seem however to have had a visitation of what you hoped they might avoid viz. fogs.  However I hope they will all be the better for it. You must not think that I have any cold of any consequence I do not think that it is a cold but I will take care you may be sure.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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               Lincoln’s Inn                                                Nov 23rd  1855

Dear Annie

I hope you are going on comfortably at Southport & feeling the benefit of fresher & more bracing air than can be enjoyed in the neighbouring country of our birth.  But I suppose I ought to intend my hopes specially to the case of our dear Emily as to the rest of you I have not understood that they are necessary.  It is rather tantalizing to hear of fine open days out of town while here we are living in a thick & dark atmosphere which for about two months in the year really justifies the assertion of our French friends that the Londoners never see the sun.  I think November in London is not living it is only continuing to exist but as I remember you have had experience of it I need not enlarge upon the subject. Last night I went to the Forensic Society where a grave matter of law was discussed which it would not at all interest you to hear an account of.  I suppose the “sublime sands” stretch away in as great an expanse as ever dappled with little pools (ie puddles) of water and marked with the traces most evident of shoeless wanderers and animals of burthen of the lower rank.   I have not seen your friend Mr Jackson again yet I see he has advanced to the degree of barrister at law by the learned & Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn last Saturday so that he will be a peg higher when you next see him.  I was asked to a call party at our inn on the same evening but as I was afraid of not being able to refrain from wishing our friend’s health & success in more than two glasses of wine (which is the outside limit I believe that you allow) that I avoided incurring your high displeasure. At Lincoln’s Inn your friend Mr J was regaling his friends with rich claret which that Society furnishes in great excellence but I have no doubt you would allow him 4 glasses considering the circumstances. I do not think there would be any chance of a favourable answer from Mr Braithwaite if I was to give him your message.  I do not think he would ever recover himself after such a shocking proposal.  It would be attended with as serious results as to ask a butler to black your shoes or ascending from below stairs (as our ancestors called it) as to tell the hospitable master of the house to bring you a plate.  The first mentioned gentleman would be about as much of his element in a ball room as you would be in the house of commons.  Have you asked at all whether the 27th would suite the convenience of most people.  It seems to me rather close upon the principal festival of the year in England but you will be better able to judge than I am.  It will quite the same to me when the day is and if on other accounts it would be well to have it near Christmas I shall be glad enough to come then.  I suppose Isabella does not now condescend to patronize the donkey boys. It always looks so pleasant to have an animal winching under the blows real or apprehended of those merciless proprietors.

With best love to all of you

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                              Decr 1st   /55

Dear Mother

I had not forgotten Isabella’s question but I did not understand that you wished an answer by return of post.  I thought of waiting a few days.  I should be able to ask some one else without of course telling that it was on our own account.  I think that either Hock or some light wine would be very suitable. 

I think they are often seen in London at such times but you might perhaps have some other kind besides Hock Moselle is very nice but I fear rather expensive. But I think in a week I could get to hear more exactly and would let you know directly. I think the 8th would do very well as far as I am concerned as I have said any time will do. I sent the note to Heath & rather expected an answer this morning.  He is as perhaps you know now living at home at Warwick.  Thornely has been in Manchester at the Chancery sittings and only returned last night.  I saw him this morning and he says that the Thornely family have for many years met at their Uncle’s on New Year’s day.  When I mentioned the 8th he said he was afraid he could not stay till then & that he was invited to stay at the Heath’s on his way back to town and so I am afraid that this may clash with Heath coming which will be very unfortunate.  I am writing to Heath this evening to tell him that the day is changed to the 8th and inviting him then instead.  I do not know whether you have Thorley down for an invitation.  He will probably be at Tabley then and so I shall take upon me to invite him when I write to him which will be I think next Monday.  I do not remember anything more to say in regard to Isabella’s letter but I think you might perhaps wait a little about the wine.  How would it be supposing I get to know about it here & brought some down with me but I am afraid that I am very unknowing on the subject.  I am sorry you do not think Emily quite equal to your hopes.  The benefit often makes itself felt afterwards tho’ it may not be very visible to others at the time.  I suppose you have heard how ill Mr Jos. Yates is. Thornely tells me that he is not expected to live out this week.      I have heard of it for some time past.

I am going on very well & am quite well.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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               London                                                          Decr 10th    /55

Dear Mother

I am afraid that I shall not have much time to write today.  You will think I am always making excuses but really last evening & again today I have been quite disappointed of an opportunity for writing. Today it has been a regular hard pull with a crabbed mining lease & I have only just got away in time to scribble a line to tell you that I will write tonight to more purpose.  It is close upon 6 and so I can only plead inability.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                          Decr 11th    /55

Dear Mother

I am glad to hear that the guests invited are likely actually to assemble as to have disappointments in this respect is rather a damper on festive operations. John Thornely & Heath I am sorry to say will not be able to come.  I think I told you that Heath wrote to me desiring me to thank you for the invitation but that a family meeting to which among others Mr & Mrs F Thornely and J Thornely were to come would prevent him leaving home in the early part of January.  I have asked Rupert Potter and have some hopes that he will come but the obstacle in his case is that he does not like to be absent from his master Mr Cairns just at the beginning to term (the first day of which is the 11th  ) as at that time there is always a great pressure of work.  Greenhow too may be in the north about that time but he I think will be obliged to return by the beginning of term.  It is impossible to fix a day that will suite all parties.  G Thorley sent me a letter accepting the invitation but making a future apology for his deficiencies in the dancing way.  In my letter I had quoted Mrs Perkins for the saying that “fellows don’t dance” but I did not of course mean that they couldn’t but that it was not an accomplishment which they particularly affected.  Perhaps you will ask Mrs H Long if we may bring him with us on the Tuesday but about this of course do what you think best only I should like to give him notice before he comes to us that there is another evening to follow. If I do not tell you any events in the course of my daily life it must I suppose be that there are not any.  I do very much the same things every day and think of much the same things and when you know what my occupations are you know what they are also and that they are not of a nature to afford much matter for correspondence.  Last night I went with Thornely McCulloch & Potter to Jullienes at Covent Garden to the Beethoven concert.  The first part was entirely composed of the works of that great author and I flatter myself that I have some appreciation tho’ perhaps but an indiscrimatory one for the higher style of music. Sainton played one concerto on the violin & Alexandree Billet the whole of a symphony on the piano but I must say I enjoyed the pieces that were performed by the entire company.  I should like some of you to have been there.  I think if I had not had the classes in the evening I should have gone several times as I think one is really justified in the paying 1/- for an evening of such a kind of pleasure.  I will remember about the Scarlet Letter.  Last Sunday week I went in the evening to the Asplands and found them all at home & well & Thom Harvey who is very often there on a Sunday.  I had a pleasant evening there & found them as kind as ever.  Mr A putting one or two legal questions which had arisen in the course of the week in his practice.  J. Harvey I think is very “capable” naturally and is a very careful and industrious worker. I think we get on very well together.               On Saturday evening every fortnight I have tea at

Dr Mannings & often meet pleasant people there.  Meadows Martineau is rather anxious just about his younger brother is very strange in his behaviour and tho’ I do not understand there is any thing really wrong in his faculties yet it is no doubt very painful.  And his sister also has been in a very low way after a fever she had in the summer. I hear of Mary Broadbent’s engagement some time ago. I believe from all I have heard that tho’ rather rough & unpolished externally Edward Greg has many estimable qualities.  I hope dear Emily is better and that you are all well and happy.  As you have fixed the party for the 8th I do not think I shall be able to be away so long as I should be if I came home for Christmas Day.  So I am afraid I shall not be with you on that day.  What are your plans on that occasion?  I hope you will be quite candid in replying to what I am going to say – would you like me to ask McCulloch. He will I know be in Liverpool about the early part of January & might perhaps think I might have invited him in case he hears of our party.  He has always been a very kind & serviceable friend to me but you will understand that I do not in the least wish him to come if you have enough already or think that your party is well arranged without any one else. It would be quite easy to tell him in case he should know that we had already as many of the immediate friends of the family or it would not be necessary to say anything about it.   Still if you do not feel any objection I should rather ask him than otherwise.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                          Decr 20th    /55

Dear Father

I dare say you are not sorry to have some breathing time and a period of rest after your close engagements at home.  Last week I went to what is an annual matter of interest & pleasure to a certain portion of society perhaps not very large the Westminster Play.  No doubt you know that it has been for a long time the custom at Westminster school before the Christmas holy days to have a performance with all the […] which may help to carry us back some 20 centuries of one of the plays of Terence.  This time it was the Phormis and as it is a long time since I had read it I made haste to make myself a little acquainted with it so that the somewhat unfamiliar sounds of Roman dialogue might not strike an altogether unintelligent ear. Proceedings commenced by a prologue which was chiefly devoted to a memorial of men who have passed away during the last year & who received their education at Westminster. Among these were Ld Raglan Dr Phillimore & Genl Markham. There was a very graceful & pleasant allusion to Dr Liddell their late head master now Dean of Christ Church Oxford who was present & indeed in the place of honour. He seemed to be very popular and looked a very pleasant and bodily & mentally powerful man.  The play itself was very well acted  & tho’ many of the points were lost on me partly perhaps because being so familiar to the majority of the audience they were loudly applauded before they had been fairly uttered and partly because I did not always quite catch the meaning at the moment.  The epilogue was the most amusing part of the entertainment.  The same characters modernised appeared in this as in the principal piece.  Armes with his shrewish & jealous wife the litigious Demiphs and the versatile & ingenious Phormis who appeared as a young man got up in the most outré modern fashion.  Doris who in the original piece is the unmitigated rascal came forward now as a released convict whom as he says partial reddit remeus tepera (a ticket of leave). The chief object was a hit at the various changes in the law lately introduced but it would be difficult to tell the various funny things that were said.  Perhaps you saw the thing itself in the Mail & felt interest enough in the thing to glance through it.  The boys looked a nice lot and were arranged in the background and sent forth rounds of applause with the greatest precision.  There was no miscellaneous applause but when the points came at which a clap was due (particularly phrases which the Eton grammar had made familiar to all) the signal was given and many dozen hands were directly beaten together with the discipline of a regiment under review. The performance was held in the dormitory which is a very long & high room generally occupied by some fifty or sixty sleepers or wakers as the case may be.  I think perhaps Rupert Potter will come but this morning he says that just about that time two cousins are going to be at their house on a visit and he does not know whether he can leave them but he will come if he can. I am sorry to hear that Arthur Darbishire had a serious accident.  He fell down the stairs at the warehouse and was very much hurt but I do not know to what extent. I do not understand dangerously hurt but seriously.  I quite hope Greenhow will come and if he does I rather think he would like to come on Saturday but the others I know will not come till Monday afternoon.

Yours very affectionately & wishing you a very happy Christmas in case I do not write again before that time

John Philip Green

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         January 1st 1856

My dear Philip

Many happy returns of the day and a happy new year to you.  We want a letter from you very much for we do not exactly know when you are coming home.  Annie and Ellen went to Liverpool on Thursday they seem to be going to a great many concerts at one they saw Mr H .J .Jackson and Lizzie. Mr J is going to a Gipsy case at Chester and very likely he will come to Knutsford tomorrow.  Annie and Ellen are going to hear Jenny Lind on Friday and on Thursday they are going to a dance at the Blackburn’s.

The tables for supper have been put up today so it quite seems like “getting on”.  We have heard today that Mrs Hollins has got the scarlet fever isn’t it a pity. Aunt Anna is going with Emily to the concert tomorrow in Manchester.  I have sprained my foot again but its much better today and I have been a ride with Catherine today we went along the Northwich Road. I saw Mrs Thorley.

Mrs Greenhow is to stay at the Martineau’s from Saturday to Monday. Miss Catlow has dedicated her new book “Garden Botany*” to Louisa and Catherine.  Mamma went to Manchester yesterday to “Partyige”.

With best love to you   Your affect    Isabella Green  

 Jany 1st 1856.  

 *[Popular Garden Botany containing a familiar and scientific description of most of the hardy & half-hard plants introduced into the flower garden by Agnes Catlow was published in 1855. British Library ref: 7030.b.13 London 1855.  B65.a.4.DSC Request Reeve 1855]

JRL Ref Box 1/22    [Ref: JA/IG/3/1856]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                             Jany 16th /56

Dear Mother

I had a pleasant & speedy journey to town and found chambers looking as bright as could be expected considering my sudden transfer from the home circle to Temple solitudes. There were no mishaps with any part of my baggage which perhaps you will be interested to hear. I did not see any of the household at No4 this morning as I wished to be in good time in New Square where J.B.B. greeted me in his mild placid manner & lost no time in commuting some goodly bundles of papers to my preparatory labours.  Things wore the same appearance as if I had been absent only a single night & I am at work feeling none the worse I can tell you for the happy ten days I have spent in the country with you all.  I think there is not doubt a holy day is a very pleasant and beneficial thing and particularly where there are such opportunities of having one as I have.  The post was very obliging to me but I cannot say I am so selfish as to be glad that it only lusted out my needs.  The guard on the train informed me that Sir Rob. Peel (on whose want of statesmanlike qualifications he considered himself quite capable of declaration) is to be married tomorrow to Lady [Emily] Hay the daughter of [..]  of Tweeddale & sister of Duchess of Wellington. I have not seen Greenhow yet but McCulloch came in to see whether I had arrived just as I was getting out of the cab. He had recovered his baggage after some days delay & again expressed the great pleasure & enjoyment his visit to us had given him. I sent off a letter to Miss Winkworth together with this and hope I have managed to give an exact translation of the passage she sent.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                          Jany 22nd   /56

Dear Father

I inclose [sic] two of the bills which I have paid & will send the third next week. I suppose you will be beginning work again this week. I do not know whether you have heard that Mr Case’s boys had the scarlet fever during last half year and his household had to be broken up.  The reason I mention it that I remembered Grundy has had a brother there and that during the holydays they have probably been together.  I do not know that the brother who was in London has the complaint and it is so long since the time that the boys at Mr Cases were separated that I can scarcely think there can be any danger from your pupil coming back to you.  Still you might like to ask him about his brother & whether there has been anything the matter with him.  I called on Mr Ashton Yates on Sunday last & found him & his second daughter at home.  Mrs Ashton & her eldest daughter were at Brighton.  I was struck with the change in Mr Yates which has taken place during the last two years. He is so much older & feebler than I have seen him before but he is as cheerful & kind as ever.  I suppose he is a man with a considerable number of years behind him.  He asked after all Knutsford friends and wished his kind regards.  Mrs Austin sent me an invitation to her house on Thursday night and I think I shall go and contribute my presence if nothing more to the entertainment.  There is to be another pupil here & I think he will be one too many.  However as he will be a beginner I dare say he will not very much diminish the work distributable among the pupils.  I have begun with the evening classes again & shall continue them regularly from this time.  I think I shall breakfast rather earlier than I do at present & so get an opportunity for a good walk before going to work.  It is often so wet and dirty in the after part of the day & engagements intervene that sometimes I do not find time to stretch my legs.  I am not as bad however as Mr James who once told me that he had confined himself to his room for more than a month without going out at all except for his dinner.  If such has been his mode of life no wonder the result has been what we see.  I dare say you are not more sorry than most people at the prospect of possible peace.  How easily we reconcile ourselves to circumstances we may be in ?  It will be quite strange not to have to look for the article of our correspondent at the seat of war and the newspapers will no doubt miss the subject matter of their most interesting […].  I wish I could give any useful advice in regard to the little Harveys coming.  I have some fears that it might be too much for dear Emily tho’ no doubt she would not have the whole work on her shoulders.

With my best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                     February 2nd    /56

Dear Mother

I did not I assure you intend to allow so many days to elapse without writing but this week it has seemed as if there was a fatality in the way of dispatching a letter.  Two days I waited to inclose [sic] the account for the newspapers which I now send.  The man was not at home when I called the first time not having heard from you that you intended to order the Athenaeum to be sent to me here I did not know that it was meant for me.  There is a namesake in Harcourt buildings with whom I not un frequently have to communicate in regard to the mutual interchange of letters meant for the other of us. It has lain most of the week at the Gardener’s lodge which is the  repository for  unclaimed  parcels but

I shall know for the future what to do & am much obliged to you for thinking of me in ordering it to be sent here.          My impression  in  regard to  the  umbrella certainly is  that  it was  paid for at the  time

I remember thinking at the time that they did not know me and seemed to make some difficulty when I proposed  to take  both the  umbrellas  they had  made in order that you might choose and that therefore

I had better pay for the one I took at the time.  Still I cannot be quite certain and unless it is entered on your accounts at home I do not think it can be paid as the price did not come out of my money.  I am sorry to hear that my father’s knee has been so painful & troublesome to him but I hope it is in a better way now.  I think I mentioned to you my invitation to the Austins.  The dancing part of the entertainment fell through as most of their friends were engaged elsewhere and there were not more than 12 or 15 persons present some of them (among whom Miss Austin commonly called Annie Austin was one) acted a charade rather well the above mentioned young lady decidedly well and then made us sit round & choose a poet each and whenever a quotation was thrown out the person whose production it was supposed to be was bound to return the compliment by shewing [sic] his familiarity with the works of his fellow authors.  It is really not a bad game & the screw put upon one for an quotation on a sudden develops a hidden knowledge of the poetic literature of our country which one was hardly conscious of before hand.  However I as you know am by no means remarkable for reading or knowing poetry.  The letter you enclosed some little time ago was as the outside no doubt informed you from Pettigrew in Charleston.  He seems very well & enjoying legal practice enough to make him feel to have a position and occupation in the world.  He says that he intends to be a defender of the causes of people who are not very able to pay lawyer’s fees and need a protector.  He says he is afraid that the plan is somewhat too high flown for practical execution but that at present he finds it very gratifying to help people in this way.  The greater part of the letter was full of American politics which seems the life of a great portion of the population of the United States.  I expect Roget will have breakfast with me tomorrow morning. I called on him the other day. I hear he has made a very good beginning in his profession.  We are going on all well at Mr B’s but nothing new to tell you.

With best love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

I saw Mr Benj Gaskell’s death in the paper

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                                                                           London                                                     February 6th   /56

Dear Isabella

Mr Greenhow asked me the other morning whether you still wished for a little dog as he has a young one which he will be very happy to give you. It is a very good one of its kind a rough haired white terrier but I do not know whether it is such  one as you would fancy or whether you wish to have an “animal” at all.  There would not be much difficulty in sending it by railway if you would like to have it.  There is no doubt about it being a “good” dog & the only thing against it is that I am afraid in our neighbourhood the animal would be too keen after game.  You will be so good as to write a line by return as I promised Greenhow to let him have an answer on Friday. He would give it to some one else if you do not wish for it but he will be quite glad for you to have it.

In haste

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                              February 10th   /56

Dear Emily

I think you were one of the last kind friends at home who favoured me with a letter & I will therefore try not to be an […]debtor.  Yesterday morning being a tempting one for an early walk unfortified by breakfast I went to take that meal at Bryanston Square as Mr Ashton Yates has more than once invited me to do.  Tho the man who opened the door seemed at first puzzled by so early a caller there was little difficulty when once in the room.  The lady of the house is still at Brighton with her second daughter and so only Mr A Miss Yates & myself were the party.  The day before they had been to an exhibition of architectural drawings & plans with which they had been much pleased.  The style in which such things are now got up has so much improved as to make them matters of other than merely professional interest.  They had also been to hear Carl Wiseman lecture on Rome ancient & modern at the Hanover Square Rooms. The lecture had pleased & interested them very much & of course both the antiquarian & artistic aspects of the subject could not have been treated by a more capable or better informed lecturer.  I was not present myself as of course I am not able to go to any afternoon lectures.  I dare say by this time you have read “Little Dorrit”.  I think it promises well. The chapter containing the whole science of government as administered by the “Circumlocution Office” is very good indeed tho there is that continual hammering at one phrase & idea which Dickens is mistaken in my opinion in making such frequent use of.  The description too in the preceding number of the debtors prison & the Father of the Marshelsea is very powerful & less forced than much of the author’s later writings.  Martineau is laying in a stock of English literature by setting aside a certain amount yearly for expenditure on that object so that “the chambers” enjoy an early opportunity of reading Little Dorrit and one or two other publications.  There is nothing to tell of J B B except that he has been rather sleepy of late which I think is merely owing to his exceeding early rising .  I believe he rises at ½ after four a plan of life not to be imitated or approved at least in London.  I hope you are all going on well and pleasantly at home this party at Grove House which Isabella tells of under an injunction of profound secrecy will no doubt be enjoyable enough by many children young and old. John Roget came last Sunday morning and I enjoyed his company and that of Mr Ralston who as perhaps I may have mentioned was a college friend of Rogets at Cambridge.  I became acquainted with him independently.  The learned Forensic Society held a debate last Thursday evening & therefore simultaneously with the debate of the House of Lords on the interesting question of the constitutionality of creating peers for life.  I dare say you did not feel enough interest in the matter to read thro the debate in the House of Peers but it was well worth reading and some light might have been thrown on the subject had the quick fingered stenographer followed the learned or as the case might be energetic addresses in the hall of Lyons Inn.  I did not speak myself as the hour was getting late before there was any opportunity and I had to leave before the end but I generally do speak whenever I am present at all.  I do not think there are any very promising orators in our society but some speak very fairly and at any rate the debates make one get up points of law which is useful practice.  I called on Mr Phipson who received me cordially and conversed for some little time chiefly on law or lawyers. He desired me to send his kind regards to my father when I wrote which I accordingly do. He thinks the Chancery bar is more promising an opening than the Common law bar tho we generally find that men feel more the difficulty of the line they have themselves chosen and think some other is easier or has greater advantages. I think his advice & opinion is correct in this matter.  I believe he has a very good practice at the Common Law and has been a very favourite master for Law students to read with.  Tell my father that I have read the mortgage deed of Mrs Woolley to my grandfather again & think that the £6 which was the surplus after reinvesting the sum borrowed belongs to Mrs Woolley’s family her executor or administrator should some time or other be paid to them. That at least is my view of the matter now that I come to read the deed again.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                  February 25th     /56

Dear Mother

You have left me rather longer than usual without any letter tho’ I do not know that I have any right to complain as I myself omitted to write last week.  Ellen’s letter tho’ very satisfactory so far as it went did not go into many particulars beyond the fact of having heard a concert and the state of the weather and I confess I feel rather “out” of information about you. Last Sunday Thornely and I went to Brixton to Martineau’s and after a country walk which would have been pleasanter had the skies been more propitious we dined at his house. Mrs Martineau was not very well and one of Meadows’ sisters and a brother are away from home and I fancy not in a very good way in regard to health. So the dinner table was much smaller than usual. One day the week before last Mr Phipson invited me to dinner & I went and found Mrs P a very pleasant lively person and among the company Mr & Mrs Twamley (who asked after Anna) a young lady with them of the name I think of Hodgetts Alfred Wills & his wife & several others. It was a pleasant evening but without anything very particular being said or done. The conversation was very much on the usual topics and as all the gentleman present were lawyers in esse or in futuro their professing occupation was not untouched. Mr Phipson was very pleasant and asked after my father & hoped he would call & see him when he next passes through London & wondered at the length of time which had elapsed since seeing him. A.Wills has known Mr Phipson for a considerable period through Birmingham connections.  One of our occupations at Tulse Hill was to pay a visit to the house which David Martineau lately married to Miss Scott is building for himself and a large & handsome place it will be when finished but I do not much like the situation.  We have had very changeable weather lately and the cold came very suddenly upon us after the warm moist days we had had but I have kept very well & free from colds which is a great blessing as I do not desire to experience being ill in chambers. In lodgings even there is more comfort and convenience in such a state of things than in chambers.  I saw Thos Harvey on Friday who tells me he is going to be at home for a time after March next while Mr Harvey is away in the South of England. We rub on very comfortably at Mr B’s and in spite of the increase of numbers in the pupil room we have not managed to quarrel and I do not think have much to complain of in regard to slackness of work. Of course it does make a difference in the quantity of papers which falls to the share of each person & this is to be regretted but hitherto as far as I am concerned personally I have almost always had something to be employed upon. I think the number we have is a little too great considering that Mr B is not a very quick worker and does not like some men knock off work very expeditiously still I think the disadvantages I have hinted at are compensated by other qualities and circumstances which exist in his care.  I do not know whether I mentioned that Clarke whom I knew at Heidelberg had turned up here for a few days. He was with me one evening last week with one or two others (Marshall &c ). He is now secretary to the American legation at Brussels & had that morning been presented at our court which ceremony he of course described to me.  He is not a very strong minded man nor does he take much interest in grave matter even politics which might be supposed to be a good deal in the thoughts of a young diplomatist but he has travelled in so many countries & seen so many different persons that he is very pleasant  & improving company.  His speech & manners have been evidently a subject of much study & are somewhat elaborate and these with a knowledge of the lighter literature & “society” of several of the chief European countries make up our friend Mr Clarke.  I hope my father’s cold has altogether left him & that you are all of you well.  I do not think I have anything more to tell you.  You know as well almost as I myself what I do every day.  I do not feel at all despondent about the future but rather the contrary & hope it is so with you likewise. Tho’ it has been said that some men’s doubts are better than other men’s certainties it is clear I think that when your way seems opened before you the best thing is to press on with such equipment as nature or acquisition have furnished you with & not to fancy anything else would have been wiser or more suitable.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                         March 3rd   /56

Dear Mother

I will not let Monday slip away without writing tho I was prevented yesterday from writing by a country walk I took with several younger friends in the after part of the day and at this moment I am expecting a summons from J.B.B.  I am glad to hear that you are feeling rather better than you were a little while ago.  I am going on very well as far as health of which I thought I sent a rather full account so recently as a week ago.  I always try to get a walk in the morning and find it answers very well and makes me feel fitter.  The lump on my cheek is not gone but I do not think it is any worse.  I think I shall give Mr Quain another call before very long and hear what more he has to say about it as of course it would be much better to get rid of it as soon as possible.  The lectures are going on very well. I do not go to all of them as some of them I have heard before in former years and others I do not much care about. I do not go out if I am settling anything with Mr B. as it is not worth while doing that. The class in the evening I attend regularly and this is useful.  The chief drawback is that the reader is such a slow and unanimate talker (tho an obliging and learned man) that slumber sometimes overcome desire of knowledge of law.  Between 8 & 9 is the crisis of evening I find in regard to sleepiness so it is rather a severe trial to have to pass it unsurrounded by such unenlivening circumstances and a room generally a considerable number of degrees above the temperature best suited for mental activity.  One of Mr Braithwaite’s clients Mr Symes invited him & his 4 pupils to dinner last week which was kind enough of him. I went among others and enjoyed myself pretty well.  Mr Symes has not any ladies in his house and the party was composed of the head of the house of Symes & Co. & Mr B & 4 pupils.  The conversation I am happy to say was very little legal which was remarkable considering the persons who joined in it. Mr Symes has a pleasant house in Montague Square which is the square running parallel to Bryanston Square.  I do not think I have seen anyone else during the last week.  Have you heard anything of the Powells lately. I have thought of asking Harry to call and see me or to come to breakfast some morning but somehow the time has been slipping on without my having done so.  I hope Brandreth is better.  I do not know whether the war has had the effect of producing the succession of dreadful crimes we have had to read of during the last two or three months. I do not remember a time when the papers almost every day had to tell of such dreadful acts of ferocity or calculating villainy as of late. It seems now almost certain as no doubt you have heard that the steamer the Pacific has been lost on her passage with a large number of passengers & crew.  It has been feared for some days past that such must have been the cause of her long absence.  The Athenaeum was not sent this week.  I should like to know where it is sent from that I may speak about it if such a thing happens again.  I have been reading Alton Locke lately and think in spite of Kingsley’s great powers & gifts there is something morbid & strained in the characters he produces and his view of life and the objects & motives of human action strike me as being essentially unsound.  The best part of Alton Locke appears to me to be the character of the Old Scotchman Sandy McKaye. The weather of late has been very propitious I should think for farming operations & I hope the harvest this year maybe as good as last was.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                        March 11th   /56

Dear Mother

The two long letters which I received from home this morning reproached me with my omission in writing yesterday.  I think however that when I receive some letter or other from you some time between the two Mondays I am more stimulated to take the pen in hand. I am sorry to hear what you tell me about Robert Holland no doubt young people who are vigorous & hopeful often prove that a marriage which at first seemed unpromising & perhaps imprudent may turn out well and happily for all parties and friends who thought least favourably of it and by seeing that the best judges often all are the persons most nearly concerned.  Still from what you say I do not think that Robert Holland has acted rightly in the matter and at any rate imprudently & inconsiderately.  It is very difficult to judge another righteously without a full knowledge of all the facts but in saying this I do not mean in the least to hint that you speak unkindly or without justification in your remarks or reference to Miss Stanley.  I do not know anything more than that several of the papers assert that what you mention has happened.  If it be the fact I do not rejoice that another protestant has declared her change of faith but simply and truly in the lady’s own account.                    We doubt it has been known or at least reported for some time past

 (I remember almost two years ago Mrs Gaskell mentioned it to me) what her state of mind was but we cannot tell that she had attained conviction.  It seems to me that whatever course a person takes in breaking away from those with whom he has been associated the one he has chosen is just not the right one. If he acts directly & on the first impulse it is hasty and unfeeling if with long consideration and declaration of mind & thoughts to friends then he ought to have publicly declared himself long ago.  But I am afraid this is a painful topic and one which there will be no good entering into more at length.  In regard to Miss Stanley I think it not improbable that her journey & occupation in the hospitals in the east may have taught her a good deal.  So far as I am informed there are none of the Protestant lady nurses there at all except Miss Nightingale.  There are the paid nurses and the Catholic Sisters of Mercy still pursuing their work.  Of the latter some more have gone out lately at the request of the surgeons. God forbid that I should depreciate Miss Nightingale’s intentions or the good works she or any of her companions have done but let the truth be known.  Dr Hall we hear could not agree with her at the hospital at Balaclava and further that he did find the assistance of the Sisters of Mercy both welcome and efficient which he has shewn by having more sent out.  Dr Cumming who was an inspector sent out by the Government himself a protestant and so far as I know unbiased state that the War Office in the presence of Mr Hawes Mr Mansell & the gentleman who informed me how much more efficient and “real” were the services of these ladies and that his observation led him to the conclusion that only a entire devotion of the life and being to this work which is secured by a religious vow could render volunteer attendance on the sick in a hospital otherwise than a hindrance to the medical men. Here then is a province of Christian activity which it has been over and over again proved is both practicable and useful which till lately the Protestant churches never thought of supplying with labourers and the attempt to do which in the hospitals in the East started as it was under circumstances as favourable as will perhaps ever arise has broken down.  Whatever value this experience may have in the future I cannot say but we shall see.  Then think of the public meetings to do honour of Miss Nightingale the royal smile and presents for doing what has in all ages of the Catholic church formed a part of the most ordinary & everyday work and to which members with bright prospects in life and everything to make the world pass happily before them devote themselves unknown to any but their families the poor and sick whose wounded bodies & souls they heal & gladden and to their Father in Heaven.  Now I beg above all things that you will not think that I am hinting that Miss Nightingale and the protestant ladies entered upon this work with any kind of hope or desire for publicity or fame or selfish and whatever all I wish to call attention to is the state of mind of the English public itself which seeks to repay or notice such work by public demonstrations.  Then with what studied silence did all the speakers treat the labours of the Sisters of Mercy it was as if they were afraid of acknowledging them and so far as I read the speeches the commonplace that works of Charity do not know the distinction of creed  was all the notice that the really efficient workers had bestowed upon them.  Not that this ungracious behaviour matter to any Catholic and least of all to the sisters themselves but it is well worthy of notice as a phenomenon of the public mind in this country.  Some such experience as this may have worked potently on Miss Stanley not that in itself it would produce a change of faith but it might lead her more seriously than heretofore to take to heart & appropriate that grace & trust which support and feed the devotion & fertility in good works which she had witnessed.  Now all this may as far as Miss Stanley is concerned be an idle dream the operation of the newspaper may be premature or wholly untrue but much of what I have said does not therefore lose its truth.  I hope I have not hurt you in any way by what I have said.  I am sure I do not know why we should not speak openly together on most subjects indeed in all.  It will indeed seem like being a visitor at home that the old little room where in spite of my unkindness and want of trust you have lavished on me such treasures of love and blessing in former days will not be mine any longer.  But I am very glad that you have done what you have done with it as it will be much more comfortable for my father to have a separate dressing room.  I am glad to hear such a good account from Ellen and hope to write a few lines to her before long.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                    March 17th   /56

Dear Ellen,

I am glad to hear that your music has prospered under the influence of a 5 hours daily practice. It does not need me to tell you that when persons find out that they possess natural gifts for certain pursuits or acquirements it is wise to develop them by such cultivation as their opportunities allow them to bestow.

A Darbishire only stayed one night in town and I missed seeming him tho’ I called twice at Dr Digby’s and Darbishire called on me in the Temple.  R Potter who saw him tells me that he will pass thro’ France and by way of Marseilles make the best of his way to Rome. Potter did not give a very good account of him but I hope his journey and holy day will bring him to rights again.  We have been parched or rather withered up by the most piercing East winds during the last week winds such as I hope blow only over the Essex marshes into the metropolis bestowing colds and other more serious complaints on every other person almost.  I have been so fortunate as to escape without any disagreeable consequences but a great many have been sufferers.  The pencil I enclose I thought my father might find convenient to carry in his pocket. I have used one for some little time & find it very much preferable to any I have seen. The lead is so thick that it is not continually breaking like other pencils. I dare say you have seen them & perhaps have one but I thought it might be found useful.  I saw the wedding at Latchford advertised & dare say it went off very happily but I have not heard any thing of the particulars.  I wish you a pleasant journey and stay at Liverpool.  I do not think I shall leave town this Easter.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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(edged in black)                                              Knutsford                                   Undated but before Easter

My dear John Philip

Annie and Ellen went to Manchester yesterday for Ellen’s music lesson they went to the Gaskells  Marianne is come home, she & Meta are coming to stay here when Meta who has a cold is better the last time they went they saw Eustace Greg he is so grown they did not know him at first. Aunt Long is staying at Leamington with the Miss Ainsworths. Mr Weston from Manchester comes here to teach singing a la Hullah* his pupils had their first lesson last Wednesday he comes at half past two, or ought to do there are thirty in the class.  Aunt Anna goes about once a fortnight to Mr Norbury an artist in Liverpool to learn oil painting she likes it very much, she is gone today & Grandmama is come to stay with us. We here think that in England the first thing people think of is how quickly they can do things, soon perhaps stamps will be sticky at the back.     Briggs was here yesterday, he came to dinner and went in the evening & he like all old boys begged a holiday, nobody begs them for me, but perhaps the case is rather different. Catherine & I have been admitted to the meetings at Grandmamma’s.  We have been once, & Tuesday is the next.  There are two of the staple animal manufacture of this house.  They are most cruelly banished and their mother is disconsolate.  Miss Mitchell is coming here most likely at Easter if she can possibly leave home.[she was a visiting governess to the Gaskells]  Mr & Mrs Heald have been here today they walked to Bowdon & Papa went part way with them took them through Tatton Park & showed them the monument at Rosthern. 

With very best love

I remain your affect sister

Isabella Green

Saturday evening

*[Hullah had a system of musical notation and gave singing classes in schools throughout Britain and the colonies during the second half of the nineteenth century.]

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Towards Tatton Mere probably painted by Anna Brandreth

 

 

 

                                                            London                                                            April 7th   /56

Dear Father

I think it is a long time since I wrote to you specially.    I have not had many letters from you that I remember but I dare say you are feeling busy and there is always some engagement intervening which makes letter writing difficult. I was glad to receive Annie’s cheerful letter and hope that you are feeling happy and have no new causes for anxiety.  On Friday evening I heard a debate in the House of Commons.  The Education Bill was expected to have come on but from some reason or other it was postponed which I was sorry for and we were unwilling auditors of the everlasting recriminations of Sir Jas Graham & Sir Chas Napier.  I do not think that the character of the former for veracity and of the latter for courage united with prudence are of such great importance that the time of the House of Commons need be occupied for now the third time in deciding upon them.  Sir Chas may be a very brave commander but he is certainly a most tedious speaker and when he does break out into a burst of a little more spirit it is when he is animated by the recollection & recital of his own great actions and pre-eminent merits.  I left about nine o’clock somewhat tired I must confess.  In the earlier part of the evening Lord Palmerston was called up by a question from Mr Gladstone in regard to the state of the communications between the United States and our Government on the subjects which have been lately so warmly debated.  I had never seen Lord Palmerston and was rather surprised at his hesitating & ungraceful style of speaking. It has been related of some persons who are subject to questions which it is inconvenient or unpleasant to answer that they have cultivated a hesitation or indecision of manner in order to give themselves a little more time to consider the expression of which they are about to make use.  I do not know whether this has been the case with Ld Palmerston but he is certainly anything but fluent & precise.  In a longer speech where he has more power of enlarging upon as well as of selecting his own topics I dare say he is more unconstrained and attractive.  I think I mentioned in my letter to Annie that lectures would soon begin again and that my time with Mr Braithwaite is nearly at an end.  I think on the whole I have done well in going again to him and for the first three months we did very well but latterly the work has not been enough for the increased number of workers.  There is never any necessity for being quite unemployed but often it is on matters which might as well be done at home as in a conveyancing chambers.  I am sorry this has been so but I considered the matter and talked with those whom I considered good advisers before I determined upon returning to him.  I am afraid I am giving you a worse idea of the state of things than there is any reason to entertain & almost all students have some reasons for complaint in the chambers they have chosen.  I have not yet said anything about going and do not yet know whether Mr Braithwaite will ask  me to stay but I have hopes he will.

I went out to Kew yesterday and passed a very pleasant afternoon in the fresh air and among the beautiful forms of tropical vegetation.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                        April 28th    /56

Dear Mother

I am sorry to hear you are having a dullish time and feel the monotony of life in present circumstances.  I am afraid my letters lately have not much contributed to make it otherwise but you know there was the law business to go into and not much has happened to me to tell you.  I daresay it is much more difficult with advancing years to maintain the same hopeful spirit and untiring energy which has enabled you to do so much for all of us and to do it so well.  However I hope some of us will be able to turn to be of help and encouragement to you. I do not think I shall be able to be away from town for more than a week and I have some doubts whether I ought to make the journey at all at this time of year but if my sisters will be at liberty during Whitsuntide week I think I may allow myself to pay you a short visit.  I am afraid that in the autumn I shall have to remain within reach of law books and have thoughts of taking up my abode a little way out of town but within accessible distance.  I have arranged with Wills not to have to pay for chambers after July and found him very accommodating in the matter.  I shall be sorry to lose my usual long visit in the autumn but there is a great deal of preparation needed for the examination in November & of course as we grow older a failure is a more serious thing.  This prospect makes me the more desirous of seeing you now and of having some talk about the state of affairs while we can.  So if Whit week is as convenient to you as any other you may look for me on Whit Monday for a visit of some days.  If a little later would suit you better I could come on the Wednesday in Whitweek and stay till the following Wednesday but I do not think I could come after this time as the lectures will begin again & you know I must attend them.  I saw Mrs Gaskell at the Shaens on Sunday week last. I did not know she had arrived and so meeting her was  to a certain extent a surprise.  She was much in her usual way when she is in London rather preoccupied but at the same time very friendly.  As she had only arrived on the preceding Friday no doubt she wanted to have a good talk with Mrs Shaen and so they were out of the room for part of the evening.  I have an invitation to the Austins next week but you must not think I am staying for that instead of setting off homeward immediately.  The fact is the lectures will be continued till the end of next week and so I should have to stay at all events.  I believe it is to be a large party and I dare say I shall find it very pleasant.  I wish some of you were to be at it as the Austin’s have a very nice set of friends so far as I know and I think you would like it.  I shall not be much longer in New Square. Mr B. asked me to stay as long as I liked but I think I shall take my departure after next week.  I do not find it practicable to work at Chambers and to prepare for the classes at the same time and so I intend to devote this summer to the latter purpose.  I hope dear Emily has quite recovered her fall down stairs and is feeling on the whole pretty well. 

Believe me dear mother, Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

If there is any invitation to any of you for Whitweek let me know and perhaps both that & my visit might be made to come in

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                                                                           London                                                           May 17th   /56

Dear Mother

The train was very long & full and considerably behind time which gives me but a very short time to write a note. I do not find anyone at chambers & indeed no one except Wills is in town. The country looked very pleasant as we rode along and the fresh air blew in at the window as if to prepare us by an over abundance for the somewhat different atmosphere of the town.  I read an account of Magna Charta out of the book with red edges which seems to excite the curiosity of fellow passengers and at intervals thought of the pleasure I have had this last week in seeing you all & being again among you.

Good bye dear mother once more & believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                           May 19th   /56

Dear Mother

I am afraid you must have though I sent you a very lame note on Saturday and I have thought that the last words of it were a very cold expression of the pleasure I had in passing last week among you.  I hope that I may ever remember the love and indulgence which you all shew towards me and may make myself worthy of it.  I feel much better both in health and spirits for my journey home and shall I hope be better able to enter on the work which seems cut out for me during the next 4 or 5 months with renewed resolution and hope.  The eggs have not found Maximilian at home so that 10 of them went to Mrs Lucas who was not unpleased & 15 to Richard Hulton who tho’ somewhat amused at the present was I think glad of some really fresh eggs.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                             London                                                          May 31st    /56

Dear Ellen

I do not know what kind of weather you may have been enjoying or bearing whichever the case may be during the last 3 or 4 days but here it has been very unlike what is to be expected from the end of May.  Happily on the firework night the skies were not very unpropitious and if the wind had interfered less with the jets of gas in the illuminated facades of the different houses there would have been nothing to complain of.  The whole affair gave a great deal of enjoyment to a great many people and would help to console them after the heavy draws of the tax gatherer.  It was very commonly remarked that the fireworks were too much of one or two kinds and this was perhaps true but still there were such numbers such profusion of them and the colours and brightness of the rockets shells so wonderful that I passed the two hours in great happiness on the balcony of Mr A Wills which directly fronts Primrose Hill in company not unknown to me.  After the aerial fireworks were over we sallied down Regents Street by dodging among horses carts & carriages and a tumultuous but very good humoured crowd towards the region of the Clubs & Government Offices.  I did not notice anything very tasteful or very original in the way of illuminations.  One or two of the larger attempts were decided failures and on arrival at home about 2 was inclined to think it all vexation & weariness of spirit.  I was prevented from being present at the Tagart’s dance and so cannot tell you anything about it expect that I hear that it was pleasant & that the Gaskells one or both of them were there. I hope the Miss Yateses have been pretty well while at Knutsford.  If they have not left you give my kind regards to them. I do not think I have anything to tell you about myself the bacon has been boiled & is approved by self & Wm Thos whenever he bears me company at breakfast.  I am occupied during the day between receiving oral information about law & taking it in through my eyes from books and that of course is not a subject you care about. Miss Winkworth sent me a copy of Bunsen’s Book I suppose on the strength of my having helped in the translation of about ½ dozen sentences.  I have not read it all yet and do not find it particularly to my liking. Wills’s book has not yet been published but I believe is on the eve of being so.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                              London                                                          June 9th   /56

Dear Mother

I am very glad to hear that you have succeeded in engaging the rooms you wished at the Lakes and will not be disappointed in your visit to that pleasant district.  Last week I called and saw Murland who is soon leaving London and to reside at home. He talked of calling to see you at Heathfield on his way through to Ireland which will be at the latter end of this month. I of course told him that I was sure you would be very glad to see him and at that time I did not know that your journey to the Lakes would take place about that time.  However perhaps you may be at home and so unless I know for certain that you will not be there when he intends to call I will not say anything more to him.  He told that he had been working hard at modern languages and his own subjects. He is very much the same as he used to be but of course more manly.  I was not invited to Mr James Yates’ party and so not able to tell you any thing about it. I do not think they know my present address they did not ask me for it when I called last and I did not volunteer to give it. I believe it was a very large one and an afternoon garden party.  I hope Aunt Long was in time at Euston Square for the train she wished to travel by and that she arrived safely at her home.  I could not very well go with her to the station as I had a lecture just at that time.  Last week I tried to get a secretaryship to Mr Beaumont the member for North Northumberland. I heard indirectly that Mr Gibbs who has been classical tutor at University Hall and has also held the office of the secretaryship in question was leaving London & that there was a chance of getting the latter engagement. I went to call on Mr Gibbs to ask about it but found unfortunately that Mr Beaumont had already engaged a successor in the office .  From what I heard it would have suited me very well and even Martineau felt inclined to try if I did not get it.  It might have distracted my attention somewhat from my examinations in October and so I felt a little doubtful whether I could undertake it advantageously but on the whole I came to the conclusion to apply and accept it if I was found likely to suit. From the account I had of the duties I think I might have made them fall in with a pursuit of the law and shall see if I cannot find some other engagement of the kind after October.  Of course there is a great difference in such offices according to the position and requirements of the principal.  Sometimes the whole time of a secretary is required and at all hours almost of the night & day but I think if I could hear of some member not occupying a government post and yet needing the services of a secretary for part of the day I should like to accept it.  I hear that Mr Sanford of Lincoln’s Inn has got the place in Mr Beaumont’s case and so you may judge that it was worth having.  Mr Gibbs said he thought I should have had a good chance & should have been glad to recommend me as his successor.

Yesterday afternoon I went to Brixton to Meadows Martineau’s where with Thornely & one or two others we had a pleasant walk in the country & dinner afterwards.

I am feeling very well in all respects and shall soon be thinking of looking for a new abode.     Greenhow & Geo. Martineau have taken a house at Esher & very much want me to join them there but I have quite declined to do so.   I think it will be quite best to get lodgings away somewhere for the autumn & return to live here after October.

With best love

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                               London                                                      July 11th     /56

Dear Father

I have as you know been employed for the last four days at Burlington House keeping watch & ward over about 24 aspirants for undergraduateship in the London University.  My actual duties have been very slight indeed and have happily not involved the detection & expulsion of any one attempting to enter his University Course by a side door.  The hours have been from 10 to 1 and 3 to 6 so that it has occupied the whole of my days during the past week.  The interval before 1 and 3 I have turned to good account by visiting the new Museum of Practical Geology in Jermyn Street which appears to me very well arranged for examination and study and not so extensive & miscellaneous as to take away all hope of gaining much advantage from it.  Exactly opposite Burlington House is the Egyptian Hall where are Lord Ward’s pictures for the enjoyment & use of the public generally and these also I have made a visit or two with great delight.

The two Powells are in my room and seem to be getting on with their examination very well at least to judge by what they tell me and the cursory glance which I have thrown over their papers.

I shall leave chambers on Monday and think of taking up my abode with J Thornely for a time at least.  The street he lives in is an open and airy one and in a pleasant and I should think healthy neighbourhood and so tho it is not in the country I think I shall go there.  The address is 9 London Street, Paddington.  If I fancy I should like to be more in the country I can still remove after a week or two.  I do not think anything has happened since you left.  Martineau is the only one of the three who visits chambers now the others are away at assizes or sessions.  I am glad to hear how much the visit to the Lakes was enjoyed and hope that all who shared in it may have lasting advantage from it.  From the account of the entrance and review of the Guards which was given in the Times you would see that the spectators were rather in evil plight in regard to seeing.  I did not see any part of the show as I had to be back at Burlington House and thought that I might be involved in a crowd and not able to return in time. I have no doubt for those who had good places it was a fine sight but for the vast majority who went hoping to see not much else than a disappointment. Most of those I have heard speak of it say that there was very little to see at least of the Hyde Park part of the affair.

With best love ,   I am 

Yours very affectionately  

John Philip Green

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                                                                            London                                                                        July 19th     /56

Dear Mother

I sent one of the books Emily asked for to Mrs Caldwell at her inn near Cheapside and you may expect to receive it in due course.  The other book I had promised to lend before Emily’s note came and that is the reason why it is not sent also.  I find the quarters in London Street very pleasant and I think I have made a change for the better on the whole. Hyde Park is very near and it is very pleasant taking a stroll there in the cool evenings.  There is little danger of my suffering from want of exercise as there was at Haverstock Hill as it is nearly 3 miles to the Temple from London Street.  We generally call it London Street, Hyde Park or Westbourne Terrace (close to which it is) which perhaps has a better sound than Paddington.  I went with Louisa yesterday to the Crystal Palace concert and enjoyed every thing very much except perhaps the two hours waiting which has to be submitted to after the first struggle for good places till the music begins.  We had the ordinary set of opera singers the old stagers Grisi Mario Fromes &c and two or three Basio Marai & Didiee whom I had never heard. I liked Didiee’s singing very much. She sang an air out of the Prophete & one or two other.  Louisa I think liked another whom I have not mentioned Mdle Devries but I was not so much taken with it tho no doubt very powerful and effective. I did not go out to the Jacksons because I heard from Mr J that their house was then full of relations whom his wife had invited not knowing that I was to have come.  Just at present they are at Esher while the house at Barnes is being painted. I dare say you have heard that the operation for which my grandmother came to town this week has been successfully performed by Mr Pritchett and that there are good hopes of her recovering her sight. It has been a critical time and no one has seen her beyond what was absolutely necessary as the slightest circumstance of disturbance often prevents the eyesight from being restored.  The two eldest Powells are at Sidmouth and I shall write on Monday & tell them the result of the examinations but I do not think there is any doubt as to their passing it successfully.  I expect the classes will be over next week or early in the following one. I am just going off to one of them now.  I sometimes walk westwards with Dr Maine who is the reader on Jurisprudence and find him a very pleasant man.  He had a brilliant college career at Cambridge and tho yet quite a young man has won himself a reputation.  The lectures he reads on Roman Law and International Law in Middle Temple Hall are very interesting and full of matter.  I hope you are having a pleasant time at home this summer tho’ your friends have disappointed you in not coming to stay with you.

With best love   

Yours very affectionately     

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                     August 2nd      /56

Dear Mother

I am sorry to hear that you do not open school with better prospects than before. I heard from J. Grundy about two months ago that he was to have Ellis with him at the Hull after the autumn. I am going on very well  the classes are all over now and I have nothing to do but read all day which I do not intend to overdo.  I called on Mr James a few days ago and saw him. He was very cordial and asked me what I am doing. I mentioned the subject of the offer which he made some time back by way of seeing whether it will be still convenient for me to come. He seemed quite to remember it & to be willing that I should see the work in his chambers.  I think I shall go to some equity counsel for about six months and then go to Mr James by which time I hope I shall at least have sufficient legal knowledge to being on my own account.  We go on harmoniously enough in London Street or the “toy shop” as it is generally called being over one. I am in ordinarily good spirits about the October examination. There are several going in who are very good men and of course the result is in any case doubtful but I will do my best.  Thornely will leave next Saturday and after that I shall be quite alone.  I think there will be hardly a single person to call in upon this sultry heat which has oppressed the lives in town for 4 or 5 days past is driving every one away.  The chief part of the conveyances which go to the Great Western Railway pass our door and it is curious just at present to see the number of private carriages and carts of luggage which are daily taking their departure.  The heat has been as great I really think as it was 2 summers ago when you were staying in Islington and has almost incapacitated me during the last two or three days from profitable exertion. I am afraid I have written you a very shabby note but there has been so much talking while I have been writing that I have felt rather distracted.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           London                                                          August 4th  /56

Dear Mother

The chief reason I had for planning to come home in September was that I though that is the least healthy period of the year in London.  At the beginning of October I shall be able I think at once to go back to the Temple which I could not do with any prudence in September supposing I were to pay you a visit immediately – and to have to find out another lodging for the interval would not be so convenient & agreeable.  I dare say I might have the present rooms without absolutely engaging them but I could not of course be at all certain of them. When the prospectus of the examination comes out which will [be] at the end of this week I may perhaps somewhat change my plan if that gives any ground for altering it but I think at present it will be better to put off my visit home till next month.  The ripe gooseberries are perhaps hardly a very important element in the question. Heath was in town this morning looking very well & brisk. He has a cause at the Guildford assizes which he came to see about. I do not know whether I mentioned that I have begun to pay a visit to Mr Braithwaite’s chambers again in the evening to see some of his books. He has kindly let me have the keys so that I can get in & out when I like.  Where are the Gaskells going to this time?  They really seem on the perpetual move rather oftener heard of down here than at Manchester. The weather here tho’ very hot has not any unwholesome feeling about it and I really feel very well & hearty myself.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                                London                                                     August 7th  /56

Dear Mother

I have taken it into my head to have a little sea bathing as you recommend as I find that I cannot at present read with as much profit as I could wish.  London is so hot and stuffy and I think I should be all the better for a little sea air. The place I have pitched upon is Dieppe.  From all I hear it is a very pleasant place good sea bathing to be had and not more expensive than an English watering place.  The journey from London is only 14/ and I do not think it will be a useless expense.  There is a French law student whom I know who has been living in London for the last two years and is going to Dieppe for a few days, so I shall go with him on Saturday next and have his assistance in finding nice lodgings.  I think if you write by return I might receive the letter before I start on Saturday.  I shall of course write immediately on arriving at Dieppe.  I should not have gone so suddenly & without giving you longer notice but the opportunity of travelling with a companion & a Frenchman made the resolve to start directly.  If I do not go so soon as Saturday I will write tomorrow but if you do not hear from me again on Saturday morning you may conclude I am away and may expect the next letter from Dieppe.                                                                                                                                                                       

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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[The next few letters were written from Dieppe and are very difficult to decipher as written on extremely thin paper – probably to keep postage costs down]                                             

                                                                           Dieppe                                                             Augt 10th  /56

Dear Father

I was sorry to hear that the fine weather has brought with it so unpleasant a visitor to my mother. I hope you do not think my expedition an unwise useless one. There was no time to communicate with you so I quite acted on the spur of the moment when the opportunity offered itself.  The passage across was very calm and pleasant just at first there was a little breeze which raised the waters of the sea and disturbed the stomachs of a large portion of the travellers one of which I was not. Among the passengers was Mr Baron Alderson & 2 sons merry enough and glad enough no doubt to escape from trying issues of fact in actions and sentencing rogues & vagabonds of various dyes & degrees of criminality to [..] punishment.  I found by the help of my friend Bazire a very pleasant apartment looking over the promenade on to the sea. The shore is somewhat steep but not at all more so than at many bathing places in England and by the number of bathers it is quite evident that there is no danger if ordinary prudence is observed.  I do not think you will have any need at all to be alarmed. I am naturally somewhat cautious and not likely to attempt anything out of the way or dangerous.  Dieppe is perhaps the most frequented bathing place in France and this of itself shews that it is as safe to bathe here as any where else.  Bazire I am sorry to say will leave with his cousin tomorrow and proceed to Paris but I shall be comfortably settled then and shall get on very well.  I have brought some books with me and intend to occupy 6 or 7 hours of the day with them.  This I think will both make my visit pleasant and prevent my mind from getting rusty.  Bazire will be back here again next Sunday or Monday from Paris.  I do not forget that this is dear Emily’s birthday.  Give her my best love and wish her many years of peace and happiness.  I think when you write you had better address to me Poste Restraunte which will be surer to find me.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Dieppe                                                             Augt 12th  /56

Dear Mother

Now that I have tried the bathing here I am able to give you a very satisfactory account in regard to its safety.  The place where the bathing tents are has a gently shelving descent & the bottom after the first few yards which are covered with most painful pebbles is clear smooth sand.  There are two boats with men in them always waiting about just a little way beyond the 7 feet of water which will drown a man as effectually as 100 fathoms and persons bathing at almost all hours of the day.  So I think you may quite rest satisfied that there is no danger in bathing here even without a companion.  The boats waiting about are a very good idea it seems to me and might very well be adopted in England.  I have found my chamber very pleasant and the woman of the house a kindly obliging person a somewhat refined Jane Webb.  There is a great deal of company and from the local organ the Bathing Journal it appears that there are distinguished personages among them.  A band plays about twice a day at the bathing house and the scene in this delightful warm weather and with the blue sea for a background is quite charming.  You know I have never liked the sea side before but here I am enjoying myself extremely.  Stretching away on each side of the town are high white cliffs with pleasant turf walks along the edge and views over the blue blue sea dotted with the white sails of the fishing boats of Dieppe.  If you ever have to go to the sea side again do not forget this place.  It is so easy of access and so convenient and pleasant in its arrangements.  I have not made any new acquaintances here but I was not about very much yesterday and without an introduction it is not a very easy thing to begin with absolute strangers.  Our tongue is continually striking upon my ear & there seem to be several nice English families here but no one that I have ever seen before.  I shall bathe every day & hope to be a pretty good swimmer before the end of my stay.  I find my French often at fault but I can get along pretty well in this respect.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Dieppe                                                            Augt 14th  /56

Dear Emily

I think after what I have said in my letter you will not consider me drowned or otherwise irregularly disposed of if I do not write oftener than alternate days.  Yesterday I took my daily dip in the afternoon had a game at cricket a game which the English residents here have set up with true British taste.

I did not bathe today as the water was very muddy and the waves looked rather stronger and higher than was quite agreeable either for swimming or bathing.  This afternoon I have been listening to the band and watching the people which is very amusing.  In spite of all that has been said crinoline is in great force and the space of ground requisite for a crowd of French ladies properly to display themselves or be seated with anything like propriety is indefinitely larger than it would be if they were so many quakeresses.  I can’t say I much admire it and it is attended with positive inconvenience to themselves I should imagine.  On Sunday in church a lady who was evidently some high personage carried round the plate for some charitable purpose or other but I am really afraid the charity rather suffered then otherwise by having her for a collector her dress was so rich and extensive that an efficient passage among the people & individual presentation of the receptacles of offerings was out of the question.  Tomorrow morning I shall make an excursion to Rouen which is only an hour & a half by railway from this place.  From all I have heard the monuments of ecclesiastical & civil architecture which are to be found are as magnificent as any and when I am so near I cannot resist the temptation of seeing so interesting a city.  I shall return on Saturday and if I am not able to write again before Sunday (which however I will try to do) you will know the reason why.  I have talked with several English people who I see about the bathing establishment but I have not made any French acquaintances which I should have liked to do.  There are four or five barristers here who’s faces I am familiar enough with and the veteran Lord Lyndhurst who in spite of his energetic efforts to resist old age is but a wreck of a man. If you write to me you may as well address the letter to my lodgings which are chez [..] Clemence Rue Hugo 38

With best love

Your affectionate brother

John Philip Green

I dare say you have hardly had time to write here or for the letter to arrive here since my first letter but I shall be glad to […] on a letter from home

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                                                                              Dieppe                                                           Augt 17th  /56

Dear Mother

I returned from Rouen last night but not early enough to inquire for letters.  But this morning on paying the post office a visit I was glad to receive a letter from Emily which from the date must have been lying there since Friday. I had made up my mind to stay a fortnight before your recommendation to do so was conveyed to me by Emily and I found that lodgings for a week only were not to be had and that the expense of a fortnight’s stay would not be much more than for seven days.  I enjoyed my trip to Rouen very much.  The town itself is a very considerable one a great deal of life and activity stirring in it finely situated on the sloping banks of the Seine and containing some noble churches.  Friday being the Emperor’s fete day there was a service at midday in the cathedral at which the leading officers of the department civil and [..] the judges & advocates of the courts of justice and a large number of the principal persons of the city were present (or ‘assisted’ as the French call it).  The city wore quite a gay appearance with the numerous tricolors which were hung out from the houses & the coloured [..] which were to serve for the evenings illumination.  A great many country people came in at the latter part of the day and the whole place appeared to be bent on thoroughly enjoying itself & succeeding in doing so.  The cathedral is a very large and solemn building but has suffered much by time and the […].  The views along it is much impeded and diverted by screens or rood left stretching across the choir quite out of character with the style of the rest of the church.  The porches and […] great western door are exquisitely beautiful open stone work.  Bas relief statues in endless profusion which described in detail would be no easy task. But the most beautiful church in Rouen is that of St Ouen.  It is a little longer than the cathedral (about 450 ft) and lofty in proportion. Its perfect symmetry and simplicity are what give it its charm.  There is very little ornament about it. The pillars are surmounted with a simple capital a few leaves or branches and each of a different pattern twined about out of which the pointed arches rise and on each pillar a niche where in former times were statues.  The whole church is now in a very perfect state having been lately restored to what was supposed to have been its original state.  The west front is almost all new in the hard Caen stone.  I never saw a church that pleased me so much as this.  There is a water pot standing near the […] which reflects the whole length of the church and the reflection in the water shows most wonderfully what an appropriate name have (ship) is for the part of the church to which the name is applied.  It seemed quite as if I was standing looking into some half finished ribs being the stone pillars and the bend of the bottom being the arched roof.  The Hotel Bonytheroulde was another curious building of about the same period as the church  (but of XVth century). There were some bas reliefs on the walls very curious representing the cavalcade of Henry VIII & Francis I when they met on the Field of Cloth of Gold. These of course were put up at a later period than the house itself.  I am sorry but I must close my letter as the letter box will be closed directly.

With best love    

Yours very affectionately 

John Philip Green

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                                                                             Dieppe                                                                          Augt 19th  /56

Dear Father

I am writing more because of adhering to my intention of letting you hear every alternative days than that there is anything very interesting to communicate. I have had several more dips, have read the papers and done some hours work in the afternoon, heard the band, sat out in the evening on the terrace and [………………………] and taken walks at different parts of the day.  I have not done much in the way of exploration of the country around Dieppe. I do not believe it has any interest picturesque or historical and somehow one does not feel so adventurous when alone as when with companions.  The French papers are somewhat uninteresting at present as indeed are all papers at this season. If the Spanish complications had not arisen I do not know what they would have done to keep themselves up to the measure of the daily quantum of news.  From what I gather the French papers generally approve the course of action which O’Donnell has pursued and consider that with him for prime minister there is a better prospect of an energetic and efficient administration without at the same time falling back into the former despotism. Tho’ all at present seems confusion in Spain yet consideration is that of the political condition of Spain at the commencement of the present century & the important steps which have been gained since then there seems a fair prospect of that country finally attaining a happier & more settled social & political position.  From all accounts there is a great deal of sound material among the Spanish people but there has been a woeful want of able or even honest public men to act as leaders.  The French papers seem to think that their English contemporaries have been making a great deal of more fuss than was called for in regard to the alleged unwillingness or rather bad faith of Rafrea in carrying out the provision of the treaty of peace.  I dare say you saw the letter Genl  Kmety the Hungarian officer who held a command at Kars calling on Genl Williams to make a fuller statement as to the share which the former bore in that perhaps brightest passage of the Eastern war.  The letter is at any rate very dignified & moderate in its tone. About a month ago I happened to read in a German paper that some soreness was felt in some quarters these on account to the oblivion in which Kmety’s service seemed to have been hidden but this is first open complaint I have seen at least in the English papers.  Mr Fairbairns speech on laying the first stone of the Manchester exhibition was as I thought very appropriate and fitting and I have not a doubt the undertaking will be a successful one.  I am very well but as I said at the beginning of my letter have nothing to say about my doings at Dieppe.  I think I shall return on Sunday or Monday.  I should have set off on Saturday but there is no boat.  If you write again after receiving this please prepay the letter as I had 8d to pay for my mothers’ which I received yesterday whereas they are only 4d if prepaid.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                                          Dieppe                                               Aug 21st /56

Dear Mother

I think I shall return to London on Saturday and not stay till Sunday or Monday. I find there is no boat on Sunday and I do not feel  it […] to stay till Monday. Bazire whom I mentioned before has returned from Paris & staying here at present. He is returning to London on Saturday & that also [..] to me to travel on that day. I think too I have had enough of Dieppe and while I have quite thoroughly enjoyed my stay here I think a longer stay would become wearisome. I must have a fortnight of work in London or perhaps three weeks before coming home. The prospectus of the examination I received before leaving London and I think it is not much better or worse than I expected. I have a great deal of work to do yet and shall have to read much during the next two months. I feel myself brisker and healthier for my fortnight’ stay. Bazire is a pleasant enough fellow whom I have known some months in London. He is from the Mauritius as also are several others at present studying law in England and intending to return to practice in their own island. From being a native of an English colony or rather profession Bazire of course speaks English quite well but he has much more of the Frenchman about him than of the Englishman. Yesterday I had a pleasant bathe but today the waves were so high that I did not venture in. There were only one or two who tried it & they seemed to be knocked about on the pebbles by the waves in anything but a pleasant manner. The town is still very full indeed. I think more and more arrive. I noticed that in about 10 days nearly 600 new names were put down at the bathing rooms as subscribers there. I have been at one or two of the balls but have not danced as I did not know anyone and tho I believe introductions are not strictly necessary yet I was quite content to be a looker on.  I think our countrywoman who was present decidedly had the advantage of the natives but a great many that are seen on the terrace did not make their appearance in the ballroom.  I understand Count Walewski the French prime minister is here and I believe I got a sight of him not knowing at the time who it was.  There is a pier projecting into the sea at the mouth of the harbour which is a very good place to sit and get the full benefit of the sea air and it is quite occupation enough to watch the splendid waves as they come dashing against it & retire boiling & seething with foam.  I was sorry to see the death of the last Earl of Shrewsbury of the direct line. I had heard some time ago how very weak & delicate he was & little expected to live very long.  I hope you are all well & with best love.

I remain your affectionate son

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Temple London                                               Aug 28th /56

Dear Father

I received Emily’s note this morning with its inclosure as also your note & Ellen’s of the preceding day which had made the round of London Street in coming to me.  I am comfortably settled in Garden Court in McCullock’s room and feel quite well and in good spirits.  I am sorry to hear that my dear mother has had another attack of her complaint. It must be very trying to have these recurrences of so painful an ailment & one too which it seems so impossible to counteract or anticipate.  I hope you have quite recovered from the indisposition from which my mother told me you were suffering a short time ago.  I do not hear anything of much sickness being prevalent in London. Of course this month is the least healthy of any in general but I have not heard that this year there has been much suffering from this cause.  The accustomed haunts of the lawyers are almost entirely emptied of their occupants and the few who are to be seen are such as like myself have the examination to look forward to or such as take the opportunity which the leisure of “the long” affords them to recruit our already overgrown legal literature with new contributions adding to a load which has already long since overpowered the strength of the strongest.  The new statutes which every past session produces in greater or less number are often made the subject of a law book written during the vacation and ready for the practitioner when he returns to work out the statues after October.  However on Saturday the library at Lincoln’s Inn closes and then there will be no library except private ones to resort to.  I have the run of Mr Braithwaite’s chambers books and as he is away I go there almost every day. I think I shall probably be at home in about a fortnight but as is always the case more & more work seems continually to present itself and assert its claim to my attention.  There is a little mulattoe from the Mauritius slaving away harder than any of his ancestors paternal or maternal from whichever line he may desire his dark skin & crisped hair. Bazire has returned after a rough passage of hours which I was glad to have been spared by crossing on the Saturday. Best love to Annie whom I have not forgotten & to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Temple London                                               Aug 31st  /56

Dear Mother

I received your note safely this morning.  I am glad to hear that you & my father are feeling better than you were a little while ago.  In regard to Philip Holt and Jas. Swinburne I have often felt that almost all my friends are either married or going to be married.  John Thornely is almost the only one who has not yet manifested any intentions in that direction. The effect of this consideration on me is by no means what my observation seem at first sight to point to but simply to remind me how old I am growing that really before very long I shall be a middle aged man!  I will not forget to call at Scheurmann’s to make the inquiry you wish.  I have seen one or two notices of Perthe’s life which have made it out to be an instructive book

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                              London                                                             Sept 8th /56

Dear Father

I need not tell you I hope how glad I should be to be going home directly but I do not feel that I can well leave town till the end of the week Saturday or Sunday.  The weather in London has been very pleasant lately not too hot or close.  I have always had a horror of London in September but I have not found it at all disagreeable or unwholesome.  I will not forget the books which I suppose are commonly enough to be met with at the bookstalls.  I am writing this at the British Museum library which has re-opened after the usual annual closing during the first week in September.  Last week if I had not had Mr Braithwaite’s chambers to read in I do not know what I should have done.  It is astonishing what a difference there is between autumn & spring in the western portion of the town.  At five o’clock when Regent Street is full of carriages & gay people during May there is now hardly anything in the way of a “vehicle” more distinguished than a cab.  I have not heard anything of the Irish tourists Thornely Greenhow & Martineau.  Wills was up in town last week at chambers.  He has had some work to do for Sir F Kelly who has set on foot the consolidation of portions of our statute law.  As you no doubt know the statute book is in a very confused and unregulated condition and Kelly’s plan as I understand is to select and class together or consolidate all the different enactments or parts of enactment which affect the same subject matter.  Wills is engaged in preparing the groundwork of part of this proposed consolidation.  He had an interview with Kelly the other day and seems to like his work.  If the plan is successfully carried on it will save a great deal of labour & perplexity as well to practitioners as to persons generally.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                                 Temple                                                           Oct 1st  /56

Dear Mother

I had a tolerably pleasant journey but did not arrive in time to write by last night’s post.  Opposite to me sat a thick necked agriculturist from Northamptonshire who smiled cheerfully at my ignorance in supposing that his native county is chiefly occupied with grazing.  In the next compartment were three Chelsea pensioners in undress who had probably been on a visit to their friends in the north.  They made themselves disagreeable by continuous but most imbecile attempts at being funny but as far as I could learn the service they had seen had been principally in barracks & did not warrant them in making themselves so prominent.  I found chambers ready for me and am now settled down again with all my “things” in their proper places.  You would hear from my father about the very kind present which Uncle & Aunt Long sent me at the omnibus.  I shall be able to set up with a most beautiful wig and gown and shall be thinking before long of giving orders for them to be made.  The afternoon yesterday was very fine in the south and I have wondered whether it was so with you & whether you availed yourself of it to make the expedition which the skies succeeded in preventing me from making with you.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                               London                                                          Oct 6th     /56

Dear Mother

I dare say we are all alike just at present in feeling somewhat anxious about the future but I for one and I am sure I may say the same for the rest of us do not think there is any ground for desponding.  Of course I am sorry as can be that it will be necessary for my dear sisters to enter upon so difficult and harassing an occupation as having a school. I cannot advise whether that or any plan of leaving home will be better as it must so much depend on their own feelings and views of what they can best do.  I think that decidedly an effort should be made that they may have some time either in Paris or elsewhere on the continent.  The change would be so much more complete than to stay for a time in London & I am inclined to think that there would be much more to enliven and freshen up there than in England.

I am not feeling more anxious about myself than I can help. I am reading steadily every day but not so as to confuse or overtire myself. I have heard of another candidate Robinson of Liverpool who is said to be a man of good abilities and hardworking. But he has not attended any of the private classes which will be rather against him. Martineau has reappeared at chambers after his journey in Ireland with Greenhow Thornely Heath & Co which they all seem to have most thoroughly enjoyed. I have not begun to take quinine yet but I will in a day or two – I really feel so well that it does not seem necessary however remembering the good effects it had formerly I will enter upon a course of it.  The eggs in spite of a tumble off the seat which the basket received were found to be safe & sound with a few exceptions (not to the soundness but to the safety) and the rest of the good things naturally did not suffer by their journey when they were so carefully packed up.  We have had but a dull week here in regard to weather and I dare say you have had much the same.  Captn Harrison who is to take the command of the immense iron vessel now building at Mill Wall and is a friend of a friend of mine says that there is going to be some fine weather during this month.  I do not know whether he is an oracle of the Jack Bunsby class but he has at any rate had experience enough of winds & skies to make his opinion of some weight.  Yesterday afternoon I rode out on an omnibus to my favourite place in the neighbourhood of London Kew gardens. The weather was rather gloomy at first but just before setting the sun shone out gloriously and lit up the bright greens and yellows and reds of the turf and flowers and trees beautifully.   I have run out my line for this time so with best love

Believe me

Yours affectionately                       

John Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                        Octr 13th      /56

Dear Father

I generally look out hopefully on a Saturday morning for a letter from some of you, at least if I have not received any during the week but last Saturday I looked out in vain. I am afraid you are all feeling very anxious about future arrangements and plans & this perhaps makes you feel less inclined to write.  But I hope you will let me hear what you are feeling & thinking and even if I can be no assistance to you at least it will do me good to know and to some extent participate in your doubts & difficulties.  In regard to giving up the school at Christmas it strikes me that if you stay in the house and my sisters have their school there it will be easier for them not to begin immediately they return from Paris or wherever else they may go for a change but to wait till after midsummer. In that case I do not myself see why you should not continue the boys you have till midsummer. But if it is thought that there is any objection to one school following another so closely or you are feeling tired of teaching which you may well be after so many years of hard work upon it then perhaps it will be better to follow what seems to be my mother’s inclination & tell the different lads now with you not to return after Christmas.  I need to say how sorry I am that there is not a larger array to finish up your life in this capacity and that you do not dismiss them with the means of an independent and more varied life secured to you.  That the latter has not been the result of your labours life is as I cannot forget in great measure owing to your liberality as a parent and especially towards me.  I will hope that I shall never forget this nor be found unequal to the obligations laid upon me.

I hear Mr Malleson has his full number again 26 after a time of some decline and indeed that he had to decline receiving five new boys. I heard this from Meadows Martineau quite casually not of course on my part mentioning the state of things at home.  This looks as if private schools were not quite done for at least in the Southern parts of England but success in this as in other callings is often difficult to account for or assure.  I am sure from various things I have heard that boys have been as well taught & I should think better looked after with you than at Mr Malleson’s.  Still I don’t at all mean to draw from this instance any ground for your trying longer to get a sufficient number of boys to make it worth while to keep up your household and devote your time to them.  I think a change will be better for you and indeed I suppose it is necessary if you consider it advisable for yourself & my mother still to live at Heathfield I am sure my sisters will find it a great support and it seems to me that it will be much easier & pleasanter for you than to have to seek another abode in Knutsford or in the neighbourhood.

As for myself I have been going on well & regularly I am feeling in very good health & strength having begun to take that wonder working liquid quinine.  I naturally feel a little anxious and at times think I do not get on as well as I ought & might. I hear of a good number of candidates going in more it seems to me than in former cases and I feel that however sorry I may be at not being the first among them I shall not have any right to feel disappointed.  There is one candidate above thirty and in several of the departments he has a good practical knowledge as well as one derived from books but I hear he has been getting ill.  The little mulattoe is the most formidable competitor having given his whole time for more than a year & a half to the classes and to preparing for this examination. He was second at the examination last January and has declared to others that he intends to be first this time.

I hope you got the Athenaeum last week it is not I think very interesting at present.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                 London                                                   Oct  20th      /56

Dear Mother

I send you with the Athenaeum a number of the Saturday Review which no doubt you have heard of . As a literary periodical it seems to me fully as interesting as the Athenaeum tho’ of course there is not so much scientific & artistic intelligence in the former as in the latter.  On the first leading article there appear to me to be some objectionable statements but generally so far as I have observed it I like its political tone.  I think Dr Maine is a leading contributor to it and indeed I believe it is almost entirely in the hands of Cambridge men.  I thought perhaps you might like to take it instead of the Athenaeum but pray do not let my suggestion weigh anything if you do not yourself desire the change as I can see the Saturday Review whenever I wish here.  On Saturday Boult paid me a farewell visit he sets off from Southampton today by the overland route for Calcutta.  He seems in very good spirits about it and I think he is very likely to do well in the position he has gained for himself. He has a decided turn for an adventurous and stirring life and in spite of considerable oddities will I think rise to eminence in the civil service.  I cannot help wishing that the appointments had been open in my day and I think I should have had a very fair chance of being enabled to expatriate myself in the same way as our young friend & old pupil has done.  I am going on quite well but as you may believe without anything particular to tell you.  My time is chiefly spent in the library or here in Harcourt Buildings.  I think on the whole I am well prepared and am not at all feeling over anxious or hurried. I have been in a good way for work and have dispatched a good quantity since I have been here.  The thought has occurred to me that very likely Mrs W Teulon would be able to give some useful information about France & perhaps some introductions.  She must know a good deal about the place and I fancy has some very good friends there tho’ I fear among the Hebrews.  Shall I call sometime and ask her in regard to what I have mentioned which after the next week I can easily do.  In trying to send 3 sheets under one stamp I followed your directions but I suppose my paper is heavier than yours.  We have at last some fine October weather which I dare say you are enjoying quite as much as we in town.

With love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                 Temple                                                            Oct 27th /56

Dear Mother

If last week I had very little to tell you this time I seem to have even less.  Greenhow & Wills have returned to chambers the former sleeping here on Saturday & thus giving me the unaccustomed pleasure of a companion at breakfast on Sunday.  Next Sunday I shall probably go out to Tulse Hill to dine by Martineau’s invitation and it will be all the pleasanter for having put the examination behind in the course of time.  I do not think I shall be able to send you word every evening during the examination but I will let you know once or twice – we do not come out till after post time and it is more satisfactory not to have to predict in one’s own case but to wait for the result being announced in due time.  We are having some very fine autumn weather with a dash of cold which is rather briskening than otherwise. The gas works which were so much talked of a little while ago as constituting a nuisance in Whitefriars (which is near the Temple) have not caused me any discomfort or uneasiness and the medical & sanitary officers who were appointed to inquire into their state and effects have reported quite in their favour in regard to the charges made against them for being hurtful to the health of the neighbourhood.  I am feeling very well indeed so well that I cannot help thinking I might have worked harder without any evil consequences & in particular that I might quite well have done without my trip to France and passed that fortnight in London.  However it would be indeed ungrateful to complain of being in good health.  I hope you can give the same account of yourself and all at Knutsford.  I am glad to hear that Ellen has paid a visit to Bolton it is what I have often had a fancy for doing but somehow the opportunity never offered itself.

With love to all

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                 London                                                   Oct 31st        /56

Dear Mother

I have just a few minutes to say that I have been doing well on the whole during the last two days.  There are fourteen candidates altogether some of course not competitors for more than an ordinary pass certificate.  Of course I have no means of  judging how I stand with regard to the other candidates but I think that as far as I myself am concerned I have passed a fair examination hitherto.  The viva voce examination is perhaps the most formidable part of the examination as you have then no time for consideration and it is carried on in the presence of three or four of the benchers of the inn.  The first morning the solicitor general was there among others. I cannot say I felt afraid of them and do not think that I really knew more than I was able to bring out. I shall not feel disappointed whatever the result is and shall not regret that I have tried for. I am sure examinations of this kind are useful and serve to give you a hint of your short comings if of nothing else.  The mulattoe is in high glee he evidently considers he has done very well indeed and so I have every reason to believe he has. It is curious how anxious his countryman Bazire is that Brunet (the mulattoe) shall be beaten. He no doubt thinks that Brunet will have an advantage over him on their return to the Mauritius if he comes off with flying colours. The first afternoon I had a severe headache a thing extremely unusual with me which was very disagreeable but I do not know that it really affected my work.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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Temple                                                           Novr 1st      /56

Dear Father

I have had rather a hard day today and am glad it is over. I do not think I have done so well today as the two first days but I hear others complain much in the same way so perhaps I am not much worse off than they. It is curious how in things which you feel more confident in than others (as was the case with me in Roman Law) you often succeed less well in than others as to which you felt more anxious.

Dr Maine tho’ an extremely pleasant and entertaining man certainly manages to put some “posers”.  However I think on the whole I am pretty well satisfied and shall without much anxiety await the announcement.  I do not know yet when it will be.  I have not any time now to enter upon matters at large but will write again in a few days.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                             Temple                                                          Nov 5th       /56

Dear Father

I am not yet able to tell you the result of the examination.  The list will most likely be published next Friday.  If I have the good fortune to be first I shall still be able to decide to be called this present term. I have called on one of the benchers in order to be proposed and have had my name screened in the hall.  My present feeling is that if I am not first but stand pretty well on the list it will be worth while putting off being called till after I have had another trial in January.  This will only lose one term and if my position on the list gives me a reasonable hope of being first on another occasion I think it will be worth while to wait. It will be time enough in any case when I write on Friday to let you know whether I shall want the money for my call now or in January as it has not to be paid till next week so there will be time even if I am called this term.  If I am not called this term there is no use having the money changed from the hands it is now in and if I am there will still be time enough to effect this after Friday. I was glad to receive my dear mother’s letter and send to her & all of you my best love & remain

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            Temple                                                          Novr 7th       /56

Dear Mother

I do not now regret that I was hopeful enough or impudent enough whichever it may be called to have my name screened and take preparatory steps to being called to the bar this term. Matters have turned out in my favour and the council as you will see by the enclosed list have been so kind as to place me at the top and to award me a piece of solid pudding in the shape of the studentship. I shall not pretend not to be glad that the result of the examination has been propitious to me.  I shall of course be now called this term and shall feel quite free to go to read with some equity counsel directly & have no further examination hanging over my head.  I shall have to make a call on my father for “the needful” to pay for my call.  The expenses will be about £90 but as I cannot be quite sure at present what the exact sum will be I shall be obliged to ask him to transfer to me £100.  If it is at Messrs Heywoods correspondents or agents in London here I can call for it and it will not be necessary to transfer it from them.  As early in next week as it can be done will be well. I do not know the precise day of call but I believe it will be some day at the end of the week.  There are two names not in the list who were present at the examination Brunet and Bullock.  They have been in at an examination before & the rule is if at the second trial a candidate is not placed first his name is not mentioned at all on the second occasion but he has to fall back on whatever place he gained at the preceding examination.  I hear that Brunet was second at the examination just concluded but owing to the rule I have mentioned his name does not appear. The Robinson who stands second is a son of Mr Robinson the solicitor of Liverpool whom I think my father knows.

The first intimation I had of my success was last night but as it was only report I did not write by the morning mail lest there might be some mistake.

The list however was in the Times this morning.

With best love to all

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                            Temple                                                        Novr 11th       /56

Dear Father

I intended to have written yesterday to thank you for all the kind congratulations which you have sent me but when I came home about 5 to write the letter Wills had someone with him on business and tho’ he never makes the least difficulty as to my using the room whenever necessary yet I did not wish just then to disturb him.  I am sure that the greater part of the pleasure which I do not deny having felt on account of my successful examination proceeds from the thought that it will prove to you and all my friends that I am really in earnest in pursuing the law and have not neglected the time & opportunities I have had at my disposal.  We must not forget however that I have had altogether a long time of preparation (tho’ it has not been without some interruptions) and that the place which I have taken would have been more honourable had I been three years younger than I am.  I called on one of the readers (Mr Birkbeck the equity reader) this morning and had a little conversation with him prefaced on his part with congratulations & good wishes for me. I have attended his class very regularly for the last year and have found him very obliging and communicative and taking a great deal of pains with his class.  I think too of calling on Dr Maines tomorrow.  Mr Birkbeck told me that the examination was about the best there had been yet, which was of course very flattering to hear.  I have received many congratulations from my friends in different quarters and in fact the only drawback is the reflection that I seem such an age in comparison with some who have done well in their examinations.  I did consult Mr James before the long vacation and he recommended me to go to some one with a good rising business and who would attend to his pupils.  It is I think better to have the recommendation of actual pupils than such as Mr James who cannot of course know particularly the merits of each as a teacher.  So I went first to Mr C Hall who received me kindly and seemed quite willing to have taken me but he was at present & for some time to come full of pupils.  Then I went to Mr Hardy who was the barrister Tayler read with for a year & liked very much indeed but he also had two pupils which was all he had accommodation for in his chambers. Then I went to Mr Eddis who had been strongly recommended to me by several persons.  He had only one pupil at present and was willing to take me for six months. So I shall go to him next week after my call. The call I find is next Monday so I shall have a few days to look about me & see some of my friends before setting to work again.  I received your letter and the order contained in it safely and hope that its application will not prove in the event to have been a useless or foolish one.  The Council of Legal Education are more trustful of the economical qualities of their students than the University of London, for instead of dribbling scholarships out by quarterly payments they pay in advance & for the whole year.  I shall have nothing to do next week but hand over the check for £52.10 which I have received today to Mr Eddis when I go to him.  I called on Aunt Powel & the Greens at Bow last Sunday and found them generally pretty well.  Harry Powell was rather poorly with a cold but the rest were all well.  I think of running down to Maidstone this week for a night or two one night I shall stay in Maidstone & one I think with Leyson Lewis who has invited me to do so.  I seem to have been running on all through the letter about myself but I hope you are all well.  Give my best love to all & thank them heartily for their kind wishes & remembrance of me.

Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

I received the papers this morning

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                                                            Temple                                                             Nov 17th  /56

 

Dear Mother

I will attempt as well as I can to satisfy your various inquiries. First as to my Maidstone visit I arrived about 4 on Thursday afternoon and of course made my way directly to King Street. I thought both my  aunts looking very well particularly Louisa and in good spirits.  My grandmother is wonderfully active and alive considering her age.  Her loss of sight made her careful and timid in moving about but now that she has regained it there seems little difference in her from what I have always known.  The next morning I walked over to Tovil to see Uncle Charles whom I thought looking thin and anxious.  They say that the Canada visit has had a very injurious effect on him.  He seems to have liked the place and would have stayed but the climate was too changeable & severe. I do not fancy he will stay much longer where he is & wish he may soon find a more comfortable settlement which I am sure he deserves.  He told me that one of the Cowans said to him that since he had been with them their paper had improved 10 per cent which on a capital of 80 or £90.00 is a large sum and it seems hard that Charles should not have had more benefit from the services he rendered. I also called at Hayle Mill where I found John Green much as usual.  Mrs J.G. I did not see.  In the afternoon Lewis called for me with his phantom & drove me over to Farleigh where I had a very pleasant evening with Mr & Mrs Leyson Lewis  Mrs L the mother (she is a very lively intelligent woman) a Mrs Hodges a friend of theirs and Meadows Martineau who came the same afternoon.  Mrs Leyson Lewis I found as I believe every one close does a very kind and agreeable person.  In the morning we walked over the farm.  The valley in which East Farleigh lies is a very beautiful one and I enjoyed very much the walk over the fields or rather hop gardens in the clean November air.  I returned to town the same afternoon.

As to quinine I took three bottles of it each containing 6 half wine glassfuls which of course at 2 a day lasted 9 days.

The benchers are the governing body of each inn of court they regulate the calls to the bar and all matters connected with the administration of the property (chambers rents etc) belonging to each inn.  A few years ago the four inns determined to establish the system of legal education which now exists.  A council of legal education was formed composed of three or four benchers from each of the inns.  Each inn secured a certain annual payment out of its funds for the purposes of the council of legal education.   The council of legal education (the chairman of which is the Solicitor General Sir Rich. Bethell) appointed readers on the different subjects on which they thought it advisable lectures  should be delivered they regulated the examinations and courses of lectures established.  So that the classes and examinations are conducted by the readers appointed by the council and the viva voce examination which I mentioned is carried on in the presence of  some of the council (who are also benchers)  But the calls to the bar are still in the hands of the benchers of  each inn and with these the council has nothing to do. The Names of the different readers you will find in the paper of rules for the examination which I enclose.  As you do not I suppose want the papers I sent you will you return them to me. A friend of mine asked me to lend them to him as he is thinking of going in on a future occasion and wants to see them.  So if you do not want them any longer perhaps you will return them as soon as you can. I have I think put everything in a right train for my call this evening and when I write again I will give you a description.

With love to dear Ellen and thank her for her pleasant & cheering letter and love to all the rest

I remain

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                           Temple                                                        Novr 19th       /56

Dear Father

On Monday evening I went through the solemnities required for a call to the bar & am accordingly at present a full blown barrister.  We had to present ourselves soon after five for the important purpose of being duly wigged and gowned.  The benchers having issued from their chamber the students who were already in line and headed by the under treasurer fell in to the procession and proceeded up the hall to the upper end of it. There the line was brought up so as to face the benchers who were on the other side of a table. The oaths or declaration were then read and a formal bow made from either side of the said table to the opposite side.  Then the treasurer who rejoices in the name of Hoggins addressed a few words to no more especially to myself and Brunet who were at the head of the row wishing us success &c.  Then having signed our names in a book we retired to our dinners.  I asked Meadows Martineau Scott and a friend of mine Keogh to dine at the same mess with me.  Sir A Cockburne having been appointed C J of the Comm. Pleas dined in hall for the last time. For the future his place of dining (except by special invitation) will be with the other Common Law judges in Serjeant’s Inn.  So he treated the hall to champagne and for this and still more on account of his general popularity received a few rounds of very hearty applause on leaving the room.  The solicitor general and a good many of the other benchers were present.  Dinner went off very much as usual and afterwards 10 or 12 of my friends came in to have desert and take wine with me.  There were hardly any speeches but some songs from different parts of the hall. There were three other call parties besides my own but the hall rather overpowers the voices.  The next morning I went down to Westminster and was sworn in again in one of the Courts before Sir Ch. Crompton Knt.  This completed the whole affair and accordingly one more was added to that fortunate or as it maybe happy unhappy class of barristers at law.

This morning I went for the first time to Mr Eddis and feel sure I shall like him and find him a good man to be with.

But it is just past time    So I remain

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                             London                                                                            Nov 29th /56

 

Dear Mother

This last week has passed quickly away and I find myself at the end of it without any reply to your’s of the 22nd   I can on further trial speak very favourably of my position and circumstances in Mr Eddis’s chambers.  There are two other pupils Freemantle (a son of the bart of that name) who is a pleasant enough man so far as I have had anything to do with him and seems to work regularly while he is here and Hunter who was third at the recent examination and seems to have a very good knowledge of law.  I do not know who he is further than what I have told you and that he is a Cambridge man.  We get on together very amicably tho’ the pupil’s room is of such confined dimensions as to bring us very close together a state of things not generally considered to promote friendly relations.  There is as yet plenty of work and Mr Eddis does it in our presence which is a great point and is very communicative in regard to all that is going on and comes under his notice.  I like him very much indeed and do not think that I could have found a better place tho’ no doubt some have a greater name and more extensive & heavy practice than Mr E.  I generally arrive about 10 & stay till 5 ½  or 6 and find quite full employment for the intermediate hours.

I called on the Taylers last Sunday evening & found them all at home and pretty well.  They have had a pleasant stay at Heidelberg during the autumn and this of course was a subject of common interest and admiration to us.

I am sorry to hear of Mr R Yates’s illness. I will call at Bryanston Square and hope it will not be to hear that he is departed.

The outer bar which you ask about is merely the proper name of the bar from which all ordinary barristers speak in the superior courts.  The inner bar is occupied by serjeants & queen’s counsel and thus all barristers not serjeants or queens counsel are outer or other barristers.

I am quite qualified in theory to take briefs or any other business that may come to me but I do as yet begin to look out for them or to pass long days in disappointed expectation. I do not see much use in taking any other room than what I have at present till the summer. I shall be entered in the law list after January as of Harcourt Buildings where I could easily receive such an unlooked for thing as a set of papers.  I think when I do set up in chambers I shall take 2 rooms and sleep where I work but in this I shall be regulated by comparative expense. I feel very free at present for all that goes on here in chambers and have not as last year to be somewhat troubled to accommodate attendance on some of the classes with taking the full advantage of Mr Braithw’s work.  But I do not forget the necessity of finding some mode of employment which either now or in a little while will be of some immediate profit.  Till now I have really been so much engaged that I have not had time to consider & make inquiries. Hoping you are as well as November allows both in health & spirits.
Believe me

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

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                                                                                                                                undated* [Nov/Dec 1856]

My dear Philip

We are so very glad to think of you coming home, will it be Tuesday ?  if it is what a great many people will be coming on that day!  Ellen and I came from Liverpool only yesterday, having been persuaded to stay longer for one thing and another.  Only think my ambition was actually fulfilled we heard  Mr Thackeray it was the second George*.  I never heard anything like it so splendid. Ellen and I are overflowing with admiration for Mrs J Thornely and think her the loveliest and most charming lady possible also Mr Heath who we like in an almost equal manner he is coming again to Liverpool after Christmas  I wish you would ask him to come here ?  Ellen went to a dance at the Jevonses on Wednesday eveng. On Monday eveng we went to a small party at the Kings which was rather pleasant only Mr King wd talk into my ear just behind me.  We have been making rather solid castles in the air on the subject of taking lodgings in Liverpool for a time this winter, the school of art &c. The Thornelys were so kind and pleasant.  We all send our best love to you. You made us both feel so tall in Liverpool

Ever yours affectionately  Isabella Green

They really want to know the day of your coming, before finishing their plans, so as not to miss any of your time.

*[Thackeray lectured on The Four Georges at various places in England and Scotland in November and December 1856 [The Letters of Mrs Gaskell J.A.V.Chapple and Arthur Pollard p.426]

JRL Ref Box 1/24   [Ref: JA/IG/5/1856]

 

London                                                                Dec 8th /56

Dear Emily

I had not heard of Mr Richd Yates’s death till your letter informed me of it.  I called at Bryanston Square last Sunday afternoon but then of course they had not heard but I think I mentioned this last week.  I am going on very quietly here in London.  I dare say quite as quietly as you are at Knutsford.  Both the other pupils at Mr Eddis’s are good men.  Freemantle was a first class man at Oxford & tho’ not a very hard worker is a man of evidently good abilities.  Hunter is a hard headed Cambridge man a 7th Wrangler I think who is very improving to be with as he is acute & argumentative.  There is a good quantity of work which has to be got through at a quicker pace than that allowed to conveyancers and now & then we diversify our occupation by stepping into the Courts to hear arguments.  This is very easy to do as the Courts of Chancery sit at Lincoln’s Inn and are close to chambers so no time is lost in going to & fro.  I had a letter from Winkworth last week in which he mentioned having been over to Knutsford and asking whether I was intending to pay a visit at home this Christmas.  In regard to this matter I almost think I may give myself that pleasure.  Last Christmas day which I spent here in town and whereon I dined by myself I found by no means cheerful and as I have been 3 months in town & it may be some time before I come northward again I think I will come and spend Christmas week with you at home.  I had a little skating last Tuesday morning at Esher.  Wills has a house there and invited me to spend a couple of nights with him coming up to town during the day.  His house is a pleasant & comfortable one not so large as the one he has had near the Regents Park & which he has let for a time.  The neighbourhood of Esher I have visited before in summer & liked it very much & the skating came in very nicely to replace the beauties of the warmer season.  The thaw came on very soon and did not allow more than a taste of the sport.  I have got our old friend Braithwaite a pupil during the last fortnight of which I think he was not sorry as he had only one other pupil besides the one I recommended. I am very well and not at all in need of a visit to the country in a physical point of view but I shall hope to see you before long unless you intimate the contrary.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/1     [Ref: JA/JPG/114]

 

                                                             London                                                                            Dec 20th /56

Dear Father

Whether or not from the feeling that I shall so soon see you in person I have been rather behindhand in my correspondence with you.  I shall travel homewards next Tuesday by the 10`o’clock train which seems convenient & speedy.  I think it reaches Chelford about 4 but am not quite sure.  It will be still quite light and I can very well walk over to Knutsford leaving my baggage to come by the coach.  I suppose the coach does not leave for Knutsford for some two hours after 4.  I have no doubt I shall have some companions in travel as all that I know who are going northwards this Christmas seem to have chosen Tuesday.  There will I dare say be rather a scramble but Tuesday will be much better in this respect than Wednesday. I hope there may be a little weather for skating as there was last year while I was with you but in this latitude the appearances of the last few days have not afforded any encouragement for such a hope. I was sorry to hear of dear Aunt Fletcher’s death.  She was of course less known to the younger ones amongst us than to the elder but I am sure all must be felt what a kind and active spirit she had and how good her influence on those about her.

I was glad to have Isabella’s note this morning & to hear that she has been having some pleasure at school.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/1     [Ref: JA/JPG/115]

 

                                                            Temple London                                                 Jany 6th  /57

Dear Mother

I had Uncle Long for a companion as far as Crewe and after that had an easy & quick but rather cold journey to London. There was quite an assemblage of “nobs” at Chelford going to Chester to appoint a chief constable for the County.   Among them Ld Stanley of Alderley, Lord De Tabley Messrs Legh Dixon Thorneycroft &c.

I had not sent any instructions of my coming but soon had a fire lighted & after I had returned from dinner found the place wearing its usual aspect and I set myself to the important work of “settling myself” which I found myself able in great measure to effect in the course of the evening.  I am just setting out to chambers again.  Wills has been away since Christmas and only Martineau is at present in chambers. It has been very well that I have been away for there are workmen in the chambers below making an awful noise and what is worse beginning punctually at 6 o’clock a.m.  I hope in the course of this week they will have completed the noisy part of the business.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

The letter which I suppose arrived at Heathfield yesterday directed to me had been posted just before I left.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/116]

 

                                                            Temple London                                               Jany 12th  /57

Dear Mother

I am sorry to hear that your household matters have not resumed a more settled condition so soon as you hoped but I hope you will before long have less trouble & annoyance from this cause.  I received a letter from Annie this morning giving a full account of their visit up to this time which sounds to be a pleasant one and likely to do them both good.  I am going to a party at the Wedgwoods tomorrow evening.  It was the invitation to this which was sent after me to Knutsford but had to be returned here again. The parties at the Wedgwoods used to be pleasant but I have scarcely been at the house during the last two years.  I think it was quite the better course to return at the time I did tho’ I need not say that I shd much have enjoyed the Knutsford parties.  There has been a good deal of work which I should have missed and it would have [been] rather awkward coming in upon it now. The workmen in the rooms below are still “in” and do not fail to rouse me in good time in the morning.  I believe their proceedings are likely to make the chambers drier and so perhaps there is no right to complain of necessary “noise” but it is rather a nuisance.  Wills has had an advantageous appointment conferred upon him in connection with the proposed amendment and consolidation of the statute law. He has been working with many others for some time without any definite engagement and now when the government have taken the matter up they have appointed three out of the larger number who have been trying their hands on the work and Wills is one of them.  He will have hard and trying work but will not have entirely to give up his other practice and the pay is at the rate of £500 a year 6 months certain. It is a very nice thing for him and I should not at all object of finding something of the kind for myself.  The term commenced today and the Chancery Courts all sat at Westminster as they do always at the commencement of term. I went with Mr Eddis to hear a matter he is engaged in and I have only just returned.  There are a few new statues in the corridor up the Houses of Parliament, one of Chatham & another of Fox which looks unutterably ungraceful & vulgar as far as the figure is concerned but the face & head is powerful and impressive.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/117]

 

 

JPG/118                                                           London                                                            Jany 24th  /57

Dear Mother

I assure you my not writing this week was not owing to any such feeling as you suggest & indeed I ought not to suppose that not to receive a letter of mine is anything in the nature of a punishment. The real reason was that I missed writing on Monday & then put it off from day to day.  Last week I had a pleasant evening at the Wedgwoods.  The judicial world was represented by families of Aldersons & Cromptons the barristerial by many individuals more or less known and even infants in the non-legal sense of the word were not altogether absent. Among the younger members of the company was our old friend Clement who looks very well & much grown.   He is a very pleasant lad indeed and has I think greatly improved tho’ he was always very nice.  He asked after you all & appeared to have pleasant remembrances of his time at Knutsford.  He is going to school at Manheim for a time and then to travel about before settling in his father’s business at Stoke.  Godfrey was there also and looking a great deal better than he did when I saw him last.  I met Mr Greg again at the Shaens this week and did not omit speaking to him.  He remembered me quite well and appeared glad to meet me again.  You know that Eustace after his brief trial for a soldiers life was settled in Liverpool.  Mr Greg seemed to think him doing well and in a good way and expressed himself glad that Eustace himself on the return of peace wished to leave the army and not idle away his life as so many officers do in frivolous dissipation.

I am going on very pleasantly at Mr Eddis’s we have now a fourth pupil who however has come chiefly for what little conveyancing work there is and I do not think the others will suffer by it.  Mr Eddis has removed into the smaller room & given up his own to us which is a great gain.  He asked me to dinner last week.  There were about a dozen people there and we had a pleasant evening. Mrs E. is a very agreeable woman. He has a good many children but they were not produced or even heard.

I have had a cold this week but am still rather hoarse but I think it is better. We have had such unpleasant weather lately that a cold is nothing remarkable.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/118]

 

 

                                                             London                                                                           Febry 2nd/57

Dear Father

I was very nearly setting off this morning on a visit to Liverpool for the Chancery sittings which are being held this week.  J Thornely in the first instance asked me to stay with them for a couple of nights but on referring to home he found that all available room at the different houses is occupied this week.  I dare say I might have found shelter with some one else had  I been very anxious to come to the sittings.  But I thought that it would be better on the whole not to shew myself at the court till I profess to be quite ready for business and I do not think that I shall lose anything by not beginning till the autumn.  Another reason was that I expect to see J E Taylor (of the Manchester Guardian) this week and I did not like to miss the opportunity of talking with him.  I have not made any attempts on the ice this week and you will see by the papers that skating has been attended with very considerable danger tho’ no lives have been lost hitherto.  I think I am better tho’ not quite well & have been keeping rather quiet and enjoying the fireside for the last week at least in the evenings.  One or two days of the last week I have been in court listening to what was going on and trying to understand the practical course of business as it appears in open court.  We have not been very full of work lately tho’ there has been always been something or other to keep us going. The Courts rose for a weeks vacation on Saturday and it is generally observable that more papers come on during the periods when the courts are not sitting than when the solicitors are occupied with the conduct of the court work.  I think when I meet Mrs Wedgwood I will shew her the lines on the Glasgow election which were forwarded to me last week.  I suppose you will have no objection to my making that use of your effusion. I have not yet paid Tweedies 5/- but will do so before I write again & inclose the receipt. I think I shall pay a visit to our friend Mr Phipson before very long.  He lives very near Mr Eddis and so perhaps I shall be able to make two calls out of one expedition.  It seems such an immense distance now to Primrose Hill tho’ when I lived out in that quarter I did not think very much about the walk.  Have you heard anything about the Gaskell journey to Rome. 

I see Mrs G’s book advertised.

With love  

Yours affectionately 

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/119]

 

 

                                                                                          Temple                                               Febry 5th  /57

Dear Mother

I am sure you need not feel any anxiety in regard to my health. I have had not more than an ordinary cold & cough which is now much better and what should have made my hand shakey or unsteady when I wrote my last letter I do not know.  The cold weather is not very easy to bear unless we feel quite well and brave in facing it out and taking plenty of exercise in the open air but on the whole I am feeling very well and not at all out of spirits and I can only wish you an existence as free from ailments as mine.

In hast

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

In regard to trousers &c I am quite well off but perhaps my new socks might have been warmer then the present ones but I had not noticed any deficiency till you mentioned the matter.  I hope dear Emily has been able to go to Liverpool

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/120]

                                                            London                                                          Febry 11th  /57

Dear Emily,

I am very much obliged to you as representing the donors for the handsome pin which you have sent me. If the possession of it should lead me on to indulge a taste for jewellery generally you will have to answer for the consequences.  I shall be some little time before I get over the natural embarrassment of carrying such a splendid object in full view of the world.  The braid for my eye glass I shall find very useful & my glass will not run such risk of being lost by depending for its sole support on a weak and neglected single cord.  Of course I shall be very glad to accompany you to Paris if there is no one at home would like to do it.  I suppose my father could scarcely leave but if he could I think he would enjoy it very much.  In regard to your writing about me to the house where you will stay I will leave it in your hands. It has occurred to me that as I should be about a good deal it might be cheaper to hire a bedroom at a hotel and be with you as much as possible except at meals. I do not exactly know what sort of a house you are going to and what your relations with it will be and so can hardly judge whether it will be better or not for me to go there during the few days of my stay.  Let me hear what you think.  Have you any inclination to write to Mrs Wm Teulon for introductions. I should suppose from what I hear that she has some good friends in Paris and they might be useful and pleasant to know. I am hopeful that the change in the weather has done you all good as I must confess it has to me. All remains of my cold have vanished & I am feeling in very good health & spirits.  I was sorry to hear that you were prevented from going over to Liverpool. The Austins have a party on Monday to which I & Greenhow are going together.  Mr Austin perhaps you know is now in the board of works in place of the poor law commission. Last Monday I was taken by a barrister friend Murphy to a private theatrical performance in which he figured at the house of a friend of his Mr Wheeler a barrister on the northern circuit. It was rather pleasant and after the performance there was a dance from which we did not return till nearly 4 in the morning. There is nothing out of the ordinary way to tell about professional engagements (or avocations as the modern slang has it).  

The account of Tweedie’s I have enclosed.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/121]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                          Febry 16th  /57

Dear Mother

I did not in the least degree intend to convey the notion that I do not like my sisters present on the contrary I think it a very handsome and appropriate article of its kind.  I only meant that I could not help feeling conscious of something unusual to myself for the first few days but now I find it quite a comfort & very useful.  I will certainly call on Miss Holland after a few days.     About three weeks ago

I called on Mr Henry Holland in these buildings and had a very pleasant chat with him. I called chiefly to ask about the Lancashire sessions at Manchester & Salford that I might judge whether the course recommended at Chancery lawyers of attending sessions was likely to be advantageous to myself.  I do not think he seemed to recommend it much in my case but said that he had felt sessions work and business so unpleasant that he had given up going.  One of his friends Cross would be able to tell me more and so before long I shall try and hear more on the subject.  We have had the Yates’ affairs in chambers as Mr Eddis has been counsel for Mr Ashton & Mr James Yates in the matter.  I do not suppose there will be any great difficulties in the administration of the Estate but the state of the property rendered it very advisable to have some other Trustees than only Mrs Yates & Mr Ashton Yates.  He from the first wished to retire and that Mrs Yates should do so also and have other Trustees appointed and this perhaps would have been the best course but Mrs Yates & her advisers have thought otherwise.  I need not tell you not to mention my having told you anything about the matter for tho’ I have scarcely told you more than you know before people do not like to suppose that their affairs are spoken of by those who see them in the way I have done.  The interest of Mrs Yates in the property is somewhat adverse to that of the rest of the family and the amount of her income is a good deal dependent on the manner in which the property is managed so that I can understand her wish to have a trustee on her behalf less immediately connected with the Yates’ family than Mr Thompson however honourable and independent he may be, but this notwithstanding I do not think she has been well advised in the present proceeding after all Chancery is not such a den of thieves as most people imagine. I have already got a new dress coat & trousers but not with silk facings.  I do not think they are much worn now and not by many except “swells” among whom I suppose are to be taken the young gentry of Lpool.  Yesterday I went a long walk which I feel much the better for. Tonight as I think I told you I am going to the Austins.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/122]

 

                                                            London                                                          March 3rd   /57

Dear Emily

I think it would be quite practicable to see Rouen on your way to Paris as the tickets are good for four days from the time of issue. It would not however be possible to stay to have a peep at Rouen without passing a night either at that place or Dieppe. There is only one steamer each way during the 24 hours and its time of sailing does not vary more than 2 or 3 hours according to the tide.  The trains leave London in the morning for Newhaven so as to suite the steamer which arrives at Dieppe in the evening form 4 to 6 or 7.  There is then a short interval of waiting at Dieppe and passengers proceeding direct to Paris arrive there about midnight.  It would be quite easy to reach Rouen the same evening stay there the night give the next morning to seeing the city and then in the afternoon proceed to Paris. First class is 28/- second class 20/-.  The second class on the French railways is quite good enough for any reasonable person but the second-class ticket does not allow the holder to be in the better part of the steamer.  The fore part is quite tolerable in fine weather but if it is at all bad weather the accommodation below is very common & disagreeable & not at all what I should like you to have to put up with.  I should recommend you to take a first class ticket on the whole.  The route by Dieppe is much cheaper than that by Calais or Boulogne the difference is almost one:two which is owing to the greater length of the sea voyage from Newhaven to Dieppe and the longer time the whole passage takes so that most persons prefer the Calais route & make it necessary for the directors of the other to hold out the temptation of greater cheapness.  Of course if you stay a night at Rouen the expense will be something more than 28/- but the place is well worth seeing and I decidedly recommend that plan.

I have not seen Mrs Teulon but I think I may as well just ask her and see what she says about Paris and her friends there and then ask her for letters.  She may know very nice people other than Jews.

I am sorry that I have made you wait a day longer for the information I have given than you wished but I did not notice till today that by your letter you ask me to write before Tuesday morning. I hope however it will not have been any inconvenience to you.

With best love   

Yours affectionately  

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/123]

 

                                                            London                                                         March 11th  /57

Dear Mother

I hope you are going on satisfactorily and not feeling the sudden cold weather which has come upon us during the last few days.  We can scarcely expect to have entirely done with winter weather just yet & the present temperature is a reminder. The result of my application to J.E.Taylor for some employment in connection with the Manchester Guardian has not been a successful one.  He answered my letter in a very friendly manner but said that at present they are fully provided with contributors to their journal and that the inconvenience of having to depend on persons at a distance from Manchester has been found to be so great that he has been obliged as much as possible to select contributors from persons who are resident in Manchester or the neighbourhood.  I have also had some conversation with Mr Greg who gave me some information which I hope I shall be able to use but said that his connection with the press had never extended beyond contributing articles on special subjects when requested to do so and that it has now almost ceased.  He could not therefore do anything in the way of helping me to get any employment of this kind but seemed quite willing to forward my wishes if an opportunity should offer. However I shall try in other quarters & hope in some way before very long to be able to find some kind of employment compatible with my other pursuits.  We are going on very well at chambers at present & we have quite enough work to fully occupy our time. We have had several interesting matters before us lately which however I do not suppose you would much care to hear about. I have not been out in the evening lately at least into society & so having nothing to tell you of such matters.  I am sorry the Athenaeum has not been forwarded till today but it lay by forgotten.  I saw Mrs Teulon who said that most of the friends she had did not live in Paris & that the only house she knows in Paris is that of Mad Coulon where she & Aunt Louisa were in a school.  She speaks of Mad.Coulon as a very nice person who gives “receptions” but now somewhat of an invalid.  But I thought an introduction would more naturally come from Aunt Louisa.  The only other person she mentioned was a professor & his wife whom she likes.  I said that I would hear from home and let her know again my sisters wish.  Did Emily say anything to Mad. Bein about my staying there.  She never told me and I though of writing a note to Bazire who is now studying in Paris and should therefore like to know where I shall be stationed.

I am quite well & enjoying my new socks & remain with love

Yours affectionately   

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/124]

 

                                                            London                                                         March 30th  /57

Dear Mother

I think both Emily & Ellen are looking pretty well the former perhaps too thin & anxious but I hope their journey will turn out well and happily for them and be a real change and rest.  I cannot learn till Tuesday at what time the train leaves London as Wednesday is the first day of the month and the time bills are not out till the day before.  I shall have also to see about a passport on Tuesday which in spite of modern civilization is still a necessary article to be provided with.  After today I shall not send the Athenaeum any more according to your request and will settle what is owing for it. I did pay for it up to January so that there is not a great deal owing. I have had to borrow some money but not much and I have paid almost everything in the way of bills for clothes & other bills.  I shall be able to get on comfortably for some time now and I do not expect that during this summer my expenses will be considerable.

My time with Mr Eddis comes to an end about the middle of May and I think then that if Mr James finds it convenient to take me I shall go to him for the rest of the summer and autumn. I hope then I shall be well prepared for any work that will be likely to come to me and the more of it & the sooner the better. I suppose you saw that Mr James has been a candidate for Derby at the late election but he retired before going to the poll.

If I find that I can live cheaply in Paris I think I shall not return till Easter Monday. Mr Eddis will make a holyday about Easter and I find that if I were to come back in the middle of next week I should not do much in the way of work.  So I shall have time to see a little of Paris myself and perhaps be of some assistance to the girls at their first outset in the new world. I hope you are all well. You may depend on our not setting out on the salt sea if the weather is bad but we will not anticipate that such will be the case.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

E Watkins called on Thursday afternoon here in the Temple. Of course I was at Mr Eddis and he told the clerk he would call in the evening.  But I did not see anything of him in the evening and as I do not know his address I cannot write to ask him to come at some other time. I should like to have seen him before setting off to Paris and I might perhaps have been of some use during the first days of his coming to London.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/125]

 

                                                            London                                                           April 16th  /57

Dear Mother

I suppose you received the note which I despatched on my arrival at Newhaven on Wednesday evening.  I have had a very pleasant visit to Paris and am glad to find on my return to chambers that I have not missed anything of importance by my fortnight abroad.  However as Easter Term has commenced and fresh papers coming in it was quite time to return to work again.

I am sorry that I was not able to make the search you asked me to make. The Imperial Library was closed during the whole of my visit and there was no admittance for anybody.  It is always closed for some weeks during each year and it happened unfortunately to cover the whole of the time of my stay in Paris. I was a good deal disappointed to find the long gallery of the Louvre which contains the great works of the Italian & Spanish painters was also closed during repairs and alterations being made and I am afraid that Emily and Ellen will also be deprived of the pleasure of seeing it from the same cause.  The weather on the whole has been pleasant but during the latter part of the time we had cold windy & wet weather.  We saw several of the regular “sights” but did not work at all hard at them.  I always find it very tiresome to run thro one thing after another without cessation and as for Emily & Ellen they will have time to enjoy the various curious or beautiful things which Paris has to shew at their own convenience and leisure.

I heard one or two preachers who pleased me very much more particularly the Pére Foelix who was giving a series of discourses especially addressed to men on the evenings of the week proceeding Easter day. I have never heard so powerful or attractive a preacher and from the distinctness & expressiveness of his voice I was able to hear and understand almost every word he said.  The sight of the nave of Nôtre Dame crowded as close as it could be with men was itself a very impressive one. On the morning of Easter Sunday there was a general communion of men also in Notre Dame and very numerously attended.

I had an introduction to a M Salvétat an advocate of the Paris bar who was formerly a Heidelberg student and one of the same set that I frequented but he left before I came and I therefore had not known him before. He shewed me round the Palais de Justice and took me into one of the Cour d’Assise where a criminal trial was going on which seemed much like our own but it was cut short by the fainting away of one of the accused.  At Salvétat’s house I met Bellair who was a student at Heidelberg in the year when I was there and is now married and settled in a lucrative business as avoné (much like our solicitor only more select).  I did not see very much of Bazire during my stay tho in the same house with him. He is on the eve of an examination in Paris in order to be entered there as an advocate and besides I was chiefly going about with my sisters.

With best love to you all

Yours affectionately

John Philip Gree

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/126]

 

                                                            London                                                           April 29th  /57

Dear Mother

You received I hope the letter from the girls which I put into the post last evening after their arrival. I thought them looking pretty well.  Isabella perhaps less so of the two.  I dare say the colds they have had & the journey did not give them the best opportunity of looking well & perhaps when I see them again there will be nothing to desire.

Do we know any people at Preston?  The Lancaster Chancery sittings are held at Preston next month and if I go which I feel inclined to do it would be pleasant to know some persons in the town and might be useful in the professional point of view.  I shall be “out of my time” with Mr Eddis about the 17th of May and if he does not invite me to stay a little longer with him which perhaps he will do I shall then be turning my thoughts to Mr James. I shall make a trail now that the new parliament is on the point of meeting to get some occupation as secretary. I have already made enquiries in several ways but it did not seem a very favourable time when the old parliament was on the point of dissolution.  A few days ago at dinner at the Temple Hall I met with a law student who said he had heard of me and told me that he had married a sister of Miss Mason’s. He seemed a pleasant enough young fellow but I was much surprised to hear he was married & had several children.  It seems he is on the parliamentary staff of the Time’ reporters and with this and other work makes some £300 a year.  To judge from what I hear the sub departments on the chief London journals are chiefly filled by Irishmen. If you meet an Irish law student you may be sure of two things that he has been at Trinity College Dublin and is in some way or other actively literary of aspiring to be so.

If I could but see my way to some means of passing over the next two or three years without incurring any obligation to strangers or any further one to my friends.  I shall look forward without much anxiety to ultimately making my way in my profession.  The fact is that in everything the prejudice is against a young practitioner.  When there are so many able and experienced men ready to do the work what reason is there to induce the trial of an unproved aspirant and this feeling must find its necessary operation more perhaps in the law than in anything else.  Still there are so many instances of men succeeding without more external advantages than I have that I do not see any reason to take a desponding view of things.

I had a letter from Emily last week which contained very much the same information as the one of Ellen’s which I read here in London, but as perhaps you may like to see it it shall be sent on.  It was retained for the perusal of Annie & Isabella and they have it now but in a few days at any rate it shall be sent. I am dining rather oftener at the Temple now than I should have done.  The price of dinners has been lowered to 2/- and I think it is worth while to pay this in order to dine “in company” and in a civilised manner.

Yours very affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/127]                                                            


Preston                                                             May 13th  /57

Dear Father

I arrived in very good time in Manchester and did the little things in the town which I had to do before going to the Court. There was very little business as the greater part of it was transferred to Preston.  About 2 o’clock the greater position of the bar indeed all except the three or four who were engaged in the last case adjourned to the Exhibition.  I had about three hours there not nearly enough to examine all the beautiful things it contains but enough to be made fully alive to the extent & value of its collection.  The only person that I saw that I knew was Arthur Darbishire & his brother. We came to Preston by the 5.15 train and arrived after an hours ride.  The barristers are in number about 16 or 18 but as is always the case the heavy work is divided among about five or six out of the whole array.  They seemed a pleasant set of men several of them I knew more or less before and the others seen inclined to act in a friendly manner towards a new-comer.  There are some 25 causes this time at Preston which is considered a large number.  I have had no intimation of anything for me and as I believe one always hears of any papers during the first day I suppose I shall be still one of the briefless.  Neither of the solicitors whom J Fletcher mentioned have any causes at these sittings and indeed I did not know any of the names of the solicitors who have entered causes except Mr Airson and Mr Falcon.  I do not suppose the former remembers having ever met me and so I did not attempt to make myself known to him.  Tom Harvey was in court to look after their business and came up and spoke to me.  I think Mr Marshall who has been settled several years in Liverpool as a barrister and is a very competent person has all the business the Harveys have at these sittings.  I think I shall go to Bolton tomorrow evening and stay with the Fletchers. I received a letter today from J Fletcher. I do not think there will be any use in staying here beyond tomorrow tho’ the sittings may last till Friday.  I have given the letters to Mr Catterall and called on Mr Ainsworth.  I found both of them out but this morning Mr Ainsworth called and seemed very friendly and invited me to dinner this evening.  Mr Catterall has also called while I was in Court and left his card so I suppose it lies on me to make another attempt to meet.  J Roget is here and is in two matters but they have not yet come on.

I remain

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/128]

 

 

 

                                                            Birkenhead                                                       May 16th  /57

Dear Mother

When I was at Preston Tom Harvey asked me to spend a night with them at Birkenhead which I concluded to do.  I had a very pleasant dinner on Wednesday with the Ainsworths whom I found extremely pleasant & agreeable people.  The Captn & Miss A had been to the Manchester Exhibition during the day and the beautiful things they had seen were of course discussed and from having seen them myself on Tuesday I was able to take some part in the conversation.  In the later part of the evening we had some pleasant singing from the two brothers & sister.  I also called again on Mr Catterall the next morning and found a hearty and cordial old man. He still holds the place of Registrar to the Court but has been pensioned and the duties of the office are now performed by two registrars, one for each of the districts over which the court has jurisdiction. He asked me to dine the following day and meet Mr James but I was engaged to go to Bolton and had to decline.  However he asked me to call whenever I visited Preston again.  I had not time to deliver the other two letters but shall find opportunity to do so on my next visit.  I had a pleasant evening at the Hollins Mr & Mrs Fletcher were at Manchester and I found Mr & Mrs J Langshaw  Mary & Jane Watkins & A Brandreth in the room when I went in.  J Fletcher came in about 9 but he was very tired after a long day’s work and was not able to talk much.  I liked the little I saw of him very much.  He had to set off again at 7 in the morning and his duties as receiver seem by no means a sinecure. The next day I went with J L into the town and saw the Market and other parts of the town. Bolton was very much what I expected to find it. I called  in on the Watkins on my way home and saw Mrs W. and all of them that I had not already seen.  I came to Liverpool about 4 o’clock and crossed to Birkenhead and was kindly received by the Harveys.  Miss Mather & our friend Captn Robert were there. The latter is certainly a good hearted straight forward fellow but not improved within the last five years in manners and appearance.  I had a good deal of talk with Mr H. who behaved very “civilly” towards me and altogether I was very glad that I had accepted Tom’s invitation. Tom is looking much better than when he was in London.  I shall go to London today by the morning train on the Great Western Railway from Birkenhead by way of Shrewsbury and Birmingham. I do not expect to arrive in time to post a letter this evening and so I do not think I shall be able to write.

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/129]

 

                                                            London                                                           May 23rd   /57

Dear Mother

I have not much to say but I thought I should like to write a line or two.  I have had my first bit of business a case for my opinion which came last Saturday.  It is from Brooks & Marshall of Ashton under Lyne.  The first named is I believe a cousin of our friend.  I shall be leaving Mr Eddis soon and I heard from him that he & Mrs E think of coming to see the Manchester Exhibition in the autumn. Would it do to ask him to stay a couple of nights or so at our house and go over in a morning to Manchester.  He is not thinking of staying in Manchester but some little distance out and it occurred to me that if you feel you would not be inconvenienced I should like to ask him & Mrs E. to stay at Heathfield.  They are both kind pleasant people and would not be difficult to have in the house.

Let me hear what you think.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/130]

 

                                                              London                                                           May 30th  /57

Dear Mother

I have not heard anything of any of the late occupants of No 13 North Crescent since they left.  The boxes were not sent off directly as they left me to see after them and I was not able to go to the place till Thursday. Yesterday I went to the office of the carriers who are in the habit of taking up packages for the L & N W Railway and ordered them to call for the boxes at North Crescent.  They were directed “by luggage train” to Knutsford and I should not think there can be any necessity for having Chelford station written on the direction. They would probably be forwarded today so that you ought to receive them this evening or Monday morning. If you do not do so early next week of course I will make enquiries here about them.  I did not go down with the girls to the station but I saw them off from North Crescent and Harry Powell was to meet them at the station and go with them to Maidstone where he will pay a visit to Uncle Charles.  The other two travellers I met at the station and saw off as I thought they might need some assistance in getting their luggage properly booked  &c.  I remove on Monday to London Street Hyde Park where I was last year.  I forget the number at this moment but till I send it you can write to me at Harcourt Buildings.  I shall also begin with Mr James next week.  I think perhaps it would be better if you would write a little note to Mrs Eddis asking her to stay a few days with us to see the Manchester Exhibition.  I will give it to Mr Eddis if from what he says when I refer to the matter I think it better to do so. I hope you will not be inconvenienced by their coming and I quite think you will like both of them. I have asked Wills to spend a night or two with us and also Scott of Stourbridge but it will not be just yet.  There is a letter in the Times this morning from Mr Shaen on behalf of Mrs Gaskell expressing her regret at having made certain statements with regard to the relations between Branwell Bronté to one of the family where he was tutor and acknowledging that the information on which she had made the statement was ill-founded.  There is also a letter from the solicitors of the person referred to accepting the apology and adding an expression of their belief that Mrs G believed the information on which she founded her statement to be true.  So I hope ends what might have been an extremely awkward affair for Mrs Gaskell.  Neither in law nor morality is any one justified in publishing of another matter of a defamatory character except in circumstances of necessity which I do not think existed in this case.  I am feeling quite well in every way. I have sent out my opinion in the case I had from Brooks and hope it will be approved by the persons who sought it. I have not heard any thing more of it. I will answer my father’s questions before long when I write to him.  I hope you are feeling pretty well and that my grandmother is better than when I was at home.  Perhaps you will enclose the note to Mrs E when you next write which I hope will be soon as I should like to call on Mr E on Tuesday or Wednesday & say good bye. I am glad to say that Cohen who as I think I told you had read Roman Law with me for some few weeks has gained the studentship at the recent examination.

Yours affectionately,

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/131]

 

9 London Street W                                          June 11th  /57

Dear Mother

I hope you have Annie & Isabella safe at home by this time. I write chiefly in reference to the return of Emily & Ellen from Dieppe. I think they will find no difficulty in making the journey home by themselves and especially as there are so many travelling together.  I think therefore there would be no use in my going to Dieppe or elsewhere to meet them and I should not on my own account like to leave London just at present without a decided necessity for it.  I asked Annie to ask you to send the four shirts which came from Manchester by Charles Powell when he comes and I say it was not necessary for me to mention the matter again but perhaps in the many things she will have to tell you she might forget this one.  I hope you will find your girls looking well I thought them so on seeing  them yesterday.  How is my dear grandmother I hope better.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/132]

 

                                                            9 London Street                                          June 17th [1857]

                                                                            Hyde Park W

Dear Mother

On receiving your note yesterday I wrote directly to Emily at Ians and expect that she will receive the note before setting off this evening.  I told her that I should have been very glad to meet her at Newhaven if I thought I could be of any real use or that they would need assistance.  But it is such a very easy thing to land and have the baggage examined at a place like Newhaven where the steamer comes close to the wharf near which are the custom house and station that I do not expect the girls will have any difficulty.  I will of course meet them at London Bridge at 8 o’clock which is the time for the arrival of the train.  Newhaven is the most convenient landing place I have ever seen as steam boat wharf custom house, hotel & railway station are all as it were under one roof and there is very rarely such a crowd of people as to create confusion. I have received my shirts safely.  Tell Aunt Long that I misread my father’s letter and was under the impression that she was to arrive on Monday or Tuesday instead of to depart home again and it was only on looking again at the letter yesterday that I became aware of the real state of the case.  I should certainly have called on Sunday had I known she was in North Crescent. I am going on very well I have not seen anything of Mr James the last two or three days as the Courts are not sitting this week and he is gone down to his country house at Shere near Guildford.

With best love    Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

My father can have a bedroom here for a week or if not here I have no doubt we can get one in the neighbourhood.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/133]

 

                                                                London                                                         July 8th 1857

Dear Mother

There will not be many more opportunities of writing home before the time will arrive when I hope myself to be there.  I do not feel there is very much to tell.  Last Monday I went to an afternoon party at the Tagarts which was intended to have been a garden one but that the heavy showers altogether prevented.  However there were musicians and a large room and we did not find frock coats and walking  boots an  insurmountable  impediment to dancing.     There were a good many people there.

I  heard from  Miss Roget that  Dr Roget had  been very ill and  they had been quite anxious about him.

I understood that he was not better but I did not hear any particulars.  Mrs E. Harvey was there. I have been looking about for chambers lately and found a room in Chancery Lane which would have suited me very well when it struck me that the room I occupy at Mr James was formerly let and is now unoccupied.        Having heard from the clerk that Mr James would probably be willing to let the room I spoke to him about it and he seemed quite willing to let me become a tenant if I did not think the rent too high.  It does seem a great deal to pay £52.10 for a single room but I have not been able to find anything that would do which would be less than £40 and I really think the advantage of being to some extent a permanent inmate of these chambers and necessarily brought into contact with Mr James would be quite equal to the additional rent I should have to pay. I think I shall determine upon making the arrangement and hope to have your approval. The situation of the chambers could not be more respectable or professional and I think there may be something in having one’s name on the same door with Mr James which will make any solicitors that come think better of me.  Then too Mr James often holds courts here as Vice Chancellor of the county of Lancashire and as I shall attend the Court I think it may be some advantage or help me to get me to get some footing.  However as to all these dreadful considerations please keep them to yourself and those at home and do not say anything about it till I have actually arranged the matter.  I & J Thornely go on very well together and I think the air of Paddington where we are is decidedly pleasant and invigorating.  I dare say I shall return to London this autumn before the end of September to try and be on the ground in good time before November

With best love

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/134]

 

                                                            London                                                             July 13th  /57

Dear Father

I understand from a note I received from Ellen that you are at present at Liverpool.  We are having another turn at the hot weather at present and certainly there are many places to be found on the earth which [sic] fresher & cooler than the Vice Chancellor’s Courts.  I have been in Court the last day or two as Mr James is in a large case which I read up and so feel some interest in.  I think if I remember right I was to call at Sir H Holland’s at the end of the month for your books and I will not forget to do so. The Chancery sittings will be held at Liverpool about the 11th August and I shall of course attend them.  If you should happen to meet Mr Avison and feel you know him sufficiently you might just mention that I attend the sittings.  I know he often has business at the sittings. I hope you find the Miss Yates’ pretty well. There is nothing here to tell.  I think I shall come home about the 1st or 2nd whatever the day the Eddis’s are to come to us.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

Love to those with you and kind regards to the Miss Yates.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/135]

 

                                                                           London                                                          July 25th  1857

Dear Mother

I hope you have not fixed the second week in August for the Eddis’s to come to us. I shall have to be in Liverpool on Monday the 10th to attend the Chancery Court which opens on the following day and I should have liked to be in Liverpool the greater part of that week as well for the purpose of attending the court as of seeing some of my friends & having something of the work at the assizes which are held about the time I mention.       I hope Isabella is not having much of an attack and am sorry to hear of it.  I shall no doubt be seeing Mr Eddis during the next day or two and will speak to him about the matter.  I shall be sorry if we cannot have them.  Their visit in the first week seemed to suit their own plans so well as well as ours that it is a pity it should be disarranged. But I hope it will not be necessary to do so. 

I will write again before long and remain

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/136]

 

                                                            London                                                          July 27th  1857

Dear Mother

I saw Mr Eddis this morning and I said I would write to you in regard to their coming at present and make one or two further enquiries.  He said he hoped you would excuse an immediate answer to your note. He is not so much afraid on their own account but after having been at Knutsford he intends making a stay of a few days in a friend’s house in Staffordshire where there is a young family & he is of course anxious not to run any risk or even cause alarm.  He & Mrs E seem to think that if the other members of our family have had the measles so that there would be no danger of it affecting others of us than Isabella only there could be nothing to fear in coming to the house. I told him I thought we had all had the complaint but that from the example of Isabella there was just a possibility of being favoured a second time.  Won’t Isabella be nearly well by next week. I hope she will dear girl on her own account as heartily as can be but what do you think with reference to the visit of the Eddis.  Let me hear by return please and then I will see Mr Eddis on Wednesday. If their visit has to be postponed the only time they will have will be in October.  Have you heard with any certainty how long the exhibition will continue open during the autumn.  Will the beginning of October suit you as well for their visit as at present supposing they prefer not coming immediately.  Mr E. is rather in want of some place to take his family to this autumn where there would be plenty of room & bracing air.  I suggested Silverdale without having had any personal experience of the place if that would not be too far from London to bring 10 or 12 people. I think you were all pleased with the place & did not find it very expensive.  Do you think a house could be found where so large a party would be comfortable.  Tell me something of the advantages or disadvantages of the place and whether you know anything of the places on the Yorkshire Coast. I dined with Mr Eddis last week and had a pleasant evening in his company .  On Saturday I went to the opera where the prices have been much reduced for the last fortnight of the season.  I heard Piccolamini for the first time and thought her a very attractive personage.  I saw Frank & Mary Green there and had an opportunity of speaking to them.

Yours affectionately

John Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/137]

 

                                                            London                                                           July 30th 1857

Dear Mother

I saw Mr Eddis after receiving your letter yesterday and I think that in all probability he & Mrs Eddis will not consider the risk of conveying measles elsewhere to be of much importance.  I dare say you will receive a letter from Mrs Eddis either tomorrow or Saturday.  Mr E. does not think they will be able to leave before Wednesday evening as some of the Vice Chancellors do not rise for the long vacation till the commencement of next week and of course it would not do to be earlier in leaving town than they are. I should have been very glad to travel homeward a few days sooner and go with the girls to the Manchester Exhibition on Saturday but it is really out of the question. I have many little things to do before leaving and besides I do not like to leave before Mr James does.  I think however that on Monday or Tuesday I shall have the pleasure of meeting you all again. Tell Emily I have called twice (with an interval of a fortnight between the times) at the place in Berners Street about the photographs and they have heard nothing of them.  They have only received two articles from Baldwins & that in pursuance of an order of their own.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/138]

 

                                                                                          Heathfield, Knutsford                          19 September 1857

Dear Cousin* 

I am naturally desirous of obtaining what interest I can on behalf of my son, who is about, this next October, to commence the practice of his profession as a Chancery barrister on conveyance and equity draftsman. You are I believe aware how successfully and honourably he has passed through his studentship for the law, and therefore I make less apology for asking you, when a proper opportunity offers, to mention his name to any of your solicitor or attorney friends. His name will be found in the regular law lists and his address, or chambers, No 3 Stone Buildings, Lincoln’s Inn.  I have been making a change in my own engagements in having relinquished my school this midsummer.  My daughters however are about to commence a school for young ladies in the same house and as I am sure they will endeavour to desire support I trust they will obtain it.  I have not been in your neighbourhood for some time but have been glad to hear that the world is not unprosperous with you.  With kind regards, in which my family write

 I remain yours very sincerely

 Henry Green.

*[John Barcham Green, Hayle Mill, Loose, Kent]

[Hayle Mill Archive 7/2/18/29]

London                                            Oct 10th  1857

Dear Father

I arrived at George Fairbairn’s about ½ past 6 and found him at home alone as his wife was on a visit in Manchester.  Mr Hodges who is a clergyman at Holmes Chapel came in to dinner.  George seems to like his present life and to have great interest in farming & country pursuits generally.  My journey to town the following morning was not illustrated by any incident and with the exception of that portion of it which lies between the point of starting & Crewe was accomplished in perfect solitude.  I found that I could be taken in at London Street and I shall remain there for a week till I get settled and can have time to inquire & consider what will the best arrangement to meet my position & purposes.  I have been to Stone Buildings this morning but found only the boy there.  Mr James has been several times during the long vacation but is not there at present.  If you have reason to write in the next few days direct to 9 London Street as my name will not be painted up on the door at Stone Buildings till Monday or Tuesday & the postman might not happen to ask for me at Mr J’s chambers.  I called on Marshall last night as he was the only one of my friends likely to be in town at present. He was only able to pay the “show” a flying visit and as he had a cousin with him at Liverpool he could not manage to pay us a visit.  However he seemed to be quite sorry that he could not bring it in and asked after you very kindly.  I found on coming to the Temple that Mrs McCulloch is like her master out of town and this accounted for the fact of no letter having been sent by return of post.  There was a note from her lying for me at the porter’s lodge.  I hope my mother & Ellen enjoyed their day at the “show”. I saw by the paper that the concert was very good and the presence of their R.Highnesses would no doubt attract numbers of people got up in at all events an expensive style.  Fairbairn says he saw the E of Wilton and thought him about the seediest man he ever saw in his life but I suppose it is rather a sign of nobbiness now a day to be shabbily got up.

Best love to all

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/139]

 

                                                                                                                                                    

                                                             9 Stone Buildings   Lincoln’s Inn W.C                      Oct 17th  /57

Dear Mother

I am now settled in chambers at Stone Buildings and have my book case set up and my books are here so that I feel quite established. I have found a room at Bayswater which will suite me very well and the only article I shall find it necessary to provide is a chest of drawers. I think with you that it is much better to delay having the bother of furniture to drag after me on each removal as long as possible.  The address is 1 Northumberland Terrace, Westbourne Terrace North.  But always direct letters to me at Stone Buildings.  I saw Mr James for a moment the other day. He was looking very well and was I think glad to see me again.  He & his wife have been to Paris for some weeks lately.  I have also seen Mr Eddis who asked after you all in a most affectionate manner.  He & his family have been at Dover and Mrs E. is much better than she was about the time of their visit to Knutsford.  As I am not yet so over-whelmed with business as to render the arrival of any a matter of indifference you will perhaps be glad to hear that I have a will to draw for Lewis & Darbishire. I have been busy upon it these last 3 days and expect to send it back to them on Monday.  I shall remove this evening from Street [sic] to my new abode and hope I shall find my quarters comfortable.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

I have engaged to take one of the chests of drawers Wills has at chambers & which he no longer wants.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/140]

                                                                          

Holly Hill                                   Saturday Oct 24th [1857*]

My dear Isabella

Though I am beginning now to write to you, I expect I shall only have time for a very short note.

I wonder when I shall see you again, not till next Midsummer I suppose. It seems such a long time since I came here.  On the whole I like it very much, better than I expected; you were quite right in what you told me about Lucy Hollins; I like her very much indeed, she is so different from what she was that autumn when she was at your house.  I am very busy here the whole week, and it is all that I can do to get everything done.  I like my German and Music lessons the best. Dr Hinkel is very nice, he is so funny and he is constantly saying things that make us laugh.  Do you go on with Dr Marcus with German?  I suppose you don’t with French.  What did you do at Southport ?  were you in the same lodgings as all the Woodland party and was Mary Harvey with you?  I never could get answers to these questions from Harriet and Ada.  I am learning drawing with chalks, not pencil, and I think I like the former best, we draw an hour every day, most of the girls do water colours and it makes me long so, to be able to do them.  I am so very sorry I am not coming home at Christmas, but of course if we cannot be all together there, it will be nicer to go to Bournemouth.  Mrs Lalor is reading “Tom Brown” aloud to us in the evening, I do so like it, you have read it, of course, have not you, because it is about Dr Arnold. We read aloud at dinner also, but the book is not a particularly interesting one, Travels in Norway.  Will you write to me sometime. I should so like a letter.

Love to all and I am dear Isabella your very affec.

Mary E.Long

[*Mary Esther Long was aged 9 living with her parents in Knutsford in the 1851 census and the only Saturday 24th October between then and 1851 was in 1857]

JA/Box 2/6

 

 

 

 

                                   The Henry Longs                                                Mary Long

 

              

London                                                              Oct 27th  /57

Dear Mother

I have not found any reason to regret the arrangement I have made as to lodging. I find it by no means “forlorn” as the room is a cheerful one with two windows looking into rather a pleasant street and has been recently fresh papered with a paper in much better taste than is generally displayed in London lodgings.  The woman of the house seems a decent obliging person and I have no doubt I shall go on very comfortably.  The exact address (which I did not give you correctly before) is No 21 Northumberland Place, Westbourne Grove North. Perhaps you will be glad to hear that I shall be likely to indulge less in the weed which “soothes” than if I had two rooms as I must confess I do not like smoking in the room I sleep in.  Mr James came back to chambers yesterday for regular work and today & yesterday I have been busy on papers of his which have come in yesterday he asked me if I should attend the Lancashire Chancery sittings next time and recommended me decidedly to give it a fair trail as he thought there is an opening and that after a time I shall get business to do. Of course being judge of the Court he cannot give me a help in any way.     I met J Thornely in the street this morning. He only returned yesterday and I had not time to hear any news from him.  On Sunday evening I called on the Taylers whom I found at tea with Mrs Schwabe & her two boys as their guests. I thought the former family looking very well, indeed much better & in better spirits than I have seen them for a long time. Hannah said she had had a letter from Emily which she intended answering shortly.  They seemed to think the plan of my sisters quite likely to succeed. 

I hope you are all well & am

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

P.S. In my walk to chambers I pass through Sussex Gardens where your friend lives.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/141]

 

 

                                                            London                                                         Novr 2nd  1857

Dear Mother

I read my father’s production “The Cat in Chancery” and did not think that the Court’s stability is likely to be seriously impaired by the circulation however wide it may be of the said work. I thought parts of it very amusing and quite worth being brought out of MSS into type for the delectation of the reading public. I do not think that playful satire on the evils of litigation & especially Chancery litigation does harm to any one.  Of course no one goes to law that can help it and complaints of the laws delay & uncertainty are doubtless coeval with the first existence of laws themselves.  These complaints whether just or not have not prevailed so far as to abolish courts of justice and I am confident that the Court of Chancery will survive the event of the “Cat” being let out of the bag, however fierce & active the said cat may be.  As far as I am concerned personally the work cannot well do any harm as it seems one way of rising in the law at the present time to shew [sic] your liberality & disinterestedness by fiercely abusing one’s own profession & the administration of justice.  I cannot say it is a line I shall take to as I think that the essential & searching reforms which have affected of late years in the different courts & especially in the Courts of Chancery have left little which can be justly complained of in our procedure.

I have made a very pleasant acquaintance through Geo. Fairburn. He asked me if I knew Hy Bagshawe a Chancery barrister a cousin of his wife’s.  I did not but I have often wished to know him as he is a very promising & rising lawyer & has the reputation of being a very pleasant man. His father is a Q.C. of the Chancery Bar and they are Catholics.  George gave me a letter to the son and he received me very kindly.        He called on me on Saturday & asked me to dine with them yesterday which however I could not do as Mr James had asked me previously.  Bagshawe said he should be very glad if I would come to his chambers and see what work he has going on and it was an offer I shall be glad to avail myself as the drawing of pleadings is a branch of business which Mr James as a Q.C. has no longer anything to do with.  Mr Fairbairn’s letter is a kind one and I hope I shall be at Chambers when he calls.  I really do not think there was anything unprofessional or undignified in writing to the two person you mention*.  In any other profession or business there would be no reason for hesitation in asking the good word of any friends and it is only in the case of the bar that there is such a nicety about the matter.  Of course I must conform to the principles of action which are laid down by professional feeling & experience for the guidance of barristers but I do not think that what has been done is in any way inconsistent with these principles.  I think however that enough has been done in this way for the present and I must be content to wait my time patiently.  I had a pleasant evening at Mr J’s yesterday. Mrs James has a somewhat difficult manner but is a decidedly clever & intelligent woman.  They have two children at least that appeared a boy & a gall the former is a nice looking entertaining lad.  The other persons there were a Mr Law and a Miss Kingston I think.  I have been telling you a long story and will now “shut up”.

I am very well indeed in health & feel my Bayswater residence suits me

Yours affectionately

J. Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/142]

* [refers to letter above, written by his father  to John Barcham Green  19 September 1857]                                                                              

                                                                                                        

 

                                                            9 Stone Buildings Linc Inn                                         Novr 7th   /57

Dear Father

I do not know that I have anything particular to tell you but as my mother seemed to wish to have a line I have sat down to write a few.  I have not yet heard anything from Longmans & perhaps it would be better during next week to call there & ask what the result of their examination of the MSS Euclid is. We are going on well at chambers term has begun and Mr J’s papers came tumbling in.  I have something to do on my own account from our friend J H Brooks who has sent the papers in the case which he sent me in the spring for an opinion to consider whether I can draw a bill which will be likely to succeed.  If I do it will I suppose involve my first appearance in court but I feel rather afraid of taking a case into court & not succeeding in it.  I think it will be the end of the month before I come northwards but I do not yet know the exact day.  It will certainly not be before the end of Michaelmas term which closed on 25th instant. We have had very unpleasant weather close muggy damp & foggy for the last few days but this afternoon it is rather better.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

A friend of mine S J Hunter who was a fellow pupil at Mr Eddis has taken the studentship at the recent examination which I was glad of.  I have seen Mr Eddis once or twice & he asks very kindly after all of you.

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/143]

 

 

 

 

                                                            London                                                          Novr 16th   /57

Dear Father

I expect to travel northwards on the Wednesday in next week. I do not quite know at what time I shall arrive as I am rather thinking of travelling by the Great Northern for a change.  The Court sits at Manchester on Friday & Liverpool on the Saturday & Monday.  I will write to Winkworth to tell him that as the Court only sits one day at Manchester I shall not have to trouble him for a bed as I shall not go to Manchester till Friday morning.  I shall have Wednesday evening & Thursday at home. 

I was in the Chancery Court today & saw our friend Mr Longman sitting as a Dft in a big suite of Spiers & Brown..  The Plt is the author of Spiers French Dictionary and complains that one Contansean whose work has been published by Longmans has made improper use of Plt’s work in the construction of his own.  I only heard the opening of the case which promised to be a somewhat heavy one.  Perhaps Mr L. may not be in a very good humour just at present tho’ of course such things must be happening to such a house as theirs as being dragged into law.  Perhaps he might be inclined to turn “the Cat” out upon the world if not in the Court.  I will call some day this week about the Euclid.  The bill I had to draw for Brooks has come to nothing as I do not think there is a good case & it would probably be a useless expense to his client to take proceedings.  I was in Court this morning holding a brief which Bagshawe handed to me. He was for another party in the suit & of course could not appear for both & so turned it over to me.  I had nothing to say as it was a matter of mere arrangement & not contested.  However it was my first appearance in Court quantum valeat.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/144]

 

                                                9 Stone Buildings

Lincolns Inn   London                                                Nov 23rd   /57

Dear Mother

I will see about the tea which you commission me to get and hope it will be more successful than the last lot which I bought for you.  I shall arrive at Knutsford from Manchester as from the opposition at present between the North Western & Great Northern Railways in conveying passengers between London & Manchester it is much cheaper to take a ticket through to Manchester and then proceed on to Knutsford.  So that it will be by one of the evening coaches either from Bowdon or Chelford that I shall arrive at home.  I have not heard anything for me to do at the ensuing sittings which I should be likely to do by this time if it is to come but I shall not yet give up attending the Court. I went to dine with the Bagshaws yesterday and had a very pleasant walk in the afternoon with Henry Bagshaw in Richmond Park which was looking beautiful in the autumn light. There were still many leaves on the trees which I was surprised to find.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/145]

 

                                                            Liverpool                                                          Nov 28th  /57

Dear Mother

I have not added to my wealth by my dancing attendance on the V. Chancellor but I suppose I must not begin to complain yet a while that I am not more fortunate. The Liverpool business was finished today sooner than was expected and so there will no Court on Monday. I am just setting off to Miss Yates’.

I shall perhaps be at Knutsford on Monday evening but at any rate on Tuesday.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/146]

 

                                                            London                                                              Dec 2nd   /57

Dear Father

I had a quick & prosperous journey to town & as usual without any incidents worthy of narration.  I left the parcel at Bowdon in Uncle Long’s name and inclose the ticket which will have to be presented in order to receive it.  On arriving at Chambers this morning I was glad to find instructions to draw deed of release from Lewis & Darbishire. As it is the second piece of work within the last two months which they have sent me to do it looks as if they intended now & then to send me conveyancing work. I have not yet seen Mr James. He has been in Court all day and this morning I was there listening to an argument on a plea in a cause of Mealor v E.Talbot in which Mr J is counsel. It is a very important case as by it E Talbot seems to wish to bring prematurely before the Court the question of his title to the Shrewsbury Estate.  Mr James is for Hope Scott & Bellaris who are the devisees of the late E of Shrewsbury.

London is very dirty & gloomy as usual at this time of the year and I have not heard or seen anything or anybody today that you would care to know about.

Believe me

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

I will make inquiries in regard to the proper course to be taken in the matter of your trust deed within the next few days & write to you on the result

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/147]

 

 

                                                            Lincolns Inn                                                      Dec 5th   /57

Dear Mother

I hope indeed that I do not make mistakes of misnomer or others of the kind I seem to have been chargeable with in the instance you produce but perhaps as I always go over a draft of a deed more than once which is rarely the case with a letter I need not be very anxious on that score.  I think the smaller size of drawers will be more likely than the others to fit me.  The present ones have always been rather too large both in length & girth.  I have been feeling quite busy since I came back with the draft I had to do for Darbishire & which I sent this evening and there has been besides a good deal of Mr James’s work going on which I wished to keep up with.  Tomorrow I am going out to dinner with P M Martineau at Brixton and expect to meet there our friend Stephen Love who is rather a chum of Meds.  Tell my father that the best course to take in regard to his trust deed is to take it to some solicitor in the first instance whether Mr Worthington or any other and say that if it is necessary for it to go to counsel to draw he would like it to be sent to me.  It would not I think do to send it to me direct as I shod not like to do anything professionally irregular which I think it would be to take such a deed directly from the “party”. Perhaps it may not need a counsel to draw at all & a solicitor would do it quite as well and there would be considerable in convenience in getting the deed properly endorsed & executed without a solicitor within whose province this especially falls.

Best love to all

from yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/148]

 

 

                                                            London                                                           Dec 11th  1857

Dear Emily

I cannot at this moment tell you certainly whether or not I shall be able to pay you a visit on the occasion of the two parties in prospect.  I think that if the excursion trains are continued during this month at their present prices I shall be likely to give myself the pleasure of seeing you.  But if not I scarcely think it would be worth while to make the journey considering that I shall probably have to come northwards at the end of next month in attendance on the Lancashire Chancery Court.  However I will consider the matter & in a day or two write again. It will I think be better for me to write to Heath &c.  I saw J Thornely since receiving your note and asked him if he thought he could come but as he did not know what the arrangements of his friends at Lpool might be he could not give any definite answer.  I know of course that I must make up my mind soon on account of writing the letters before the persons we wish to see have made other engagements.  In the last letter I wrote home I intended to have told you that Mrs H Jackson had a daughter born to her about 10 or 12 days ago.  Mr J asked me to tell you of it & to say that both his wife & the baby are doing very well indeed.  I heard again today the same effect this morning.  He would have written himself but has been really so full of business legal or domestic that he has not been able to find time to do so.

I have had a letter from Aunt Louisa asking me to go down to Maidstone about Xmas to take part in a “quadrille party” on the 28th inst.  I have not yet written an answer and I think that the Knutsford plans will rather stand in the way of my accepting her invitation.

Last night I dined with the Eddises (?) who were kind in their inquiries after you & asked whether any of you had been or were likely to visit town.  I saw some of the children for the first time who seemed very nice and kept in very good order.  The night before I met Geo. Fairbairn in the Strand and we went to the theatre together. He & his father were passing through London on their way to the continent where they will be a couple of months and will go as far as Naples.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/149]

 

 

                                                            London                                                           Dec 24th  1857

Dear Mother

The letter enclosing A D’s letter safely reached me and I wrote to him some days ago a “civil” letter explaining the actual state of the case.  I quite felt that it was the better course and my letter had said nothing more than that he might remember that we had told him that for our Knutsford parties it was necessary to invite gentlemen from a distance.  I did not intimate that we were in want of gentlemen on this present occasion or in any way ask him to bring some “as a charity” to use Ellen’s expression.  I told you in a former letter that J Thornely had promised to come. I have not been able to see Marshall.  His father is in town and I think he is engaged with him. In case I should not see him what do you say to having Maximilian. He I know will be travelling northwards next week & might like to come. However just as you please about this.   Let me have a line on Saturday morning.  I will see about the commission you mention.  I shall leave town either on Monday or Tuesday and be with you as early as I can.  Merry Christmas & best love to you all

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/2     [Ref: JA/JPG/150]

 

 

 

Grove House                                                 Undated [1858*]

My dear Philip

We have heard that in Saturday’s Athenaeum there is a notice of Papa’s Euclid * will you please send us one.  Mamma thinks it undignified to ask Mr Siddeley** as he told Aunt Anna of it.  We are some of us at Grove House, and Mr Hall is sitting here. Aunt and Uncle are going to John Broadbent’s tomorrow there is to be an horticultural show there. Papa seems rather better today but he finds it very difficult to move, he does not go down stairs.  I want the Athenaeum very much, a stray number is always very welcome to me. Mr F Holland has called today and stayed a long time several other people called too.

Ever your affecte

Isabella Green

[*Gradations in Euclid by Henry Green was published during 1858]

[**John Siddeley’s printers & stationers was opposite the Royal George in Knutsford]

JRL Ref Box 1/25   [Ref: JA/IG/6/1858]

 

 

                                                            London                                                              Jany 4th  /58

Dear Mother

I reached town in safety on Saturday evening. I had quite a satisfactory day in Manchester. I called first on R Darbishire in reference to the deed I am engaged in drawing for him. He seemed very kindly disposed  towards me and I think that if I do his business satisfactorily he intends to continue to send me conveyancing to do for him. I saw F Tinker who will in the course of a week or two send me the first sum of the amount which he has been so kind as to promise to lend me. He would have done it before but owing to the large payments he has had to make to his uncle’s Trustees he has been somewhat short of money himself.  I will bear in mind what you said about careful spending of this loan and of course feel how much depends just now on my own prudence & judgement so that I may not become incumbered with debt even to those who would not press their claim with strictness & without delay.   I went up to the Gaskells after concluding these matters and had lunch with Mrs G and her two daughters.  Mr G arrived from London where he has been for about a week after we had finished lunch but as he was engaged at dinner for some time and I had to leave at 3 I did not see much of him. Mrs G was very pleasant indeed and Meta naturally in a more regular temper of mind than when I saw her in the summer.  My absence from town has not this time had the effect of attracting business to await me on my return, indeed with the exception of one or two notes nothing whatever has arrived here and no one so far as I can learn has called.  So that I think I have had the pleasure of a visit home without feeling that I might as well have been “sticking close” to work.

Believe me dear Mother

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/151]

 

                                                            London                                                         Jany 12th  1858

Dear Father

I was sorry to hear by my mother’s letter that some of you are unwell and others have to busy themselves with household matters. I hope both masters and servants are by this time in a more regular and comfortable way.  We have had very remarkable & sudden changes of weather here within the last ten days and many I know have been sufferers in consequence but I have been hitherto quite free myself from cold or other illness.  On Thursday evening I am going to a dancing party at the Hensleigh Wedgwoods’ which will most likely be agreeable but I have no other engagements of a social character either in connection with the approaching marriage of her Royal Highness or otherwise. 

The term as you my have noticed commenced yesterday & the Courts of Chancery after a first day’s sitting at Westminster have returned to the precincts of Lincoln’s Inn. Mr James has a good deal of work in and I am feeling busy at present tho’ not I am sorry to say on my own account.  Marshall leaves for St Petersburgh on Saturday and I am going to breakfast & I suppose take leave tomorrow morning.  I have not yet seen him since his return but he called & left a note for me today. 

I think I told you that Mr James is counsel for the devisees in trust for the will of the late Earl of Shrewsbury in the Chancery proceedings which have been commenced by Earl Talbot. It has not yet come in court but pleading has been going on very actively in black & white which tho’ not quite so exciting is perhaps more important than what goes on by word of mouth and in silk & horsehair.

I have very little news to tell you as with me one day is very much like another but I think my life is one that suits me and I have no reason to complain of it.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/152]

 

 

                                                               London                                                     Jany 21st   1858

Dear Mother

I received the copy of the Macclesfield Courier which you forwarded to me and read with much interest my father’s lecture so far as contained therein.  I am glad to hear that it was so favourably received by its auditors to whom the greater part of the information it contained must have been quite news.  I have sent the Courier on to Maidstone as requested. I have not had any more business on my own account since I returned to town but I am expecting to receive further instructions before long from R Darbishire so that I may go on with the business of Mr Whitehead’s property.  Mr James has plenty of work at present and with that and the reading the reports that come out I find I have quite enough to do to occupy my day.  I am quite on pleasant terms with him and feel quite at home here now.  I have been all the day in Vice Chancellor Wood’s Court hearing the argument in the case of the Shrewsbury Estates which I think I mentioned to you.  It was not finished when the Court rose.

I think I have not written since the Wedgwood’s dance. It was a decidedly pleasant affair, the company in the earlier part of the evening was interspersed with juveniles who cleared off about ten & left the older birds a little more room to turn about on the floor.  Roget was there among others and the Austins & Tagarts.  The legal profession is generally powerfully represented at this house and last Thursday was not an exception.  The Aldersons were there with one of whom I had the pleasure of dancing .  I picked up acquaintance with a very pleasant man who is in the same office (solicitors) with the eldest Wedgwood of the name of Weld a Lancashire man and nephew of the late Cardinal of the same name.

Let me hear again before long from you &

Believe me

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/153]

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                   5th February 1858

[Letter from Henry Green to his cousin John Barcham Green: date from postmark on envelope]

My dear Sir

I am about to publish a jeu d’esprit, the title of which I enclose. You will perceive that it is without my name, - and therefore I mention it to you in confidence.  I am venturing to ask if you will have it in your power to assist in the circulation and sale.  If you could and would order a few copies through me directly, the profit to myself would be so much the more as I should save the booksellers deductions.  But I do not desire any subscription or subscribers. The work will be ready in about a fortnight.

With kind regards to yourself and Mrs Green.

Believe me,

faithfully yours

Henry Green

As no one in my family at home knows of my intended publiction if you write to me address me, without any name

Master of out Chancery

Mr John Heywood

170 Deansgate, Manchester

[HMA 7/2/34 Jan-Feb 1858]

 

 

                                                                           Liverpool                                                  February 5th  1858

Dear Mother

I have again had a profitless errand in coming to the Lancashire Court and have not any good news of that kind to tell you.  The business has been quite up to the average in quantity but has not had the benefit of my abilities in aiding the transaction of it.

The first night after I left you I staid [sic] at the Gaskells and saw Mr Gaskell and the children.  I thought Mr G looking better than when I saw him before.  I did not see anyone I knew in Manchester the next day and indeed I left for Liverpool about 3 in the afternoon.  That evening I dined at the Adelphi with 6 or 7 other of the barristers and slept there.  The next day I was in Court all day. In the evening I dined with Mr Aspinall the barrister having previously been to the Thornelys to see them and deposit my luggage.  This morning I have again been to the Court and am about to return to the Thornelys house where I shall spend the evening. I shall go to Manchester tomorrow and leave by the 4.15 for London.  I wish I had a better account to give of myself in a professional way but I suppose it is far too soon to be getting impatient.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/154]

 

                                                                           Linc. Inn                                                        Febry 8th 1858

Dear Father

I had a safe and speedy passage to town which as is always the case on Saturday evening seemed full of life and bustle. The only communications I found awaiting me at chambers this morning were two invitations for days which are now past and a letter from Meta Gaskell explaining the absence of the female members of their family last Tuesday and generally to a like effect as that received at Knutsford from her elder sister.  Mr James greeted me kindly this morning and was sorry that I had not yet had the opportunity of appearing before him when on the bench.  Of course I feel anxious enough on all accounts to be getting into business but I do not feel that I have as yet any right to complain. It is however somewhat aggravating to find a man like Bardswell go down and at once step into as much business as he can do.  But this again is what I ought always to have expected. I think I told you what Wm Grundy said about his daughters yaleat quantum. Wm Thornely asked how my sisters felt about their school and seemed to think that trade and commercial relations generally have been so bad this winter as to make those persons who are connected with it less willing to spend much just at present whether on the education of their children or otherwise.  He thought that in the spring or summer this difficulty may be less felt & that they will be more likely to hear of pupils at least from quarters as those referred to.

I received the paper which I will forward this evening

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/155]

                                                            Linc Inn                                                                       Febry 17th   /58

Dear Mother

I did not exactly mean in my last letter to convey the impression that I was disappointed at the absence of results from my northward journeys but only that I naturally felt anxious that something should come of them before long. I cannot forget that most of those who are getting work are of longer standing than myself or have strong local connexions who can always secure them a considerable amount of business.  So that do not think that I am feeling in any way discouraged or out of heart but merely that the present is a somewhat critical time for all of us and that the sooner we see our way forward the pleasanter it will be.

The weather here has been very changeable of late Saturday & Sunday most unutterably wet & wretched but today bright & fine. I have been having a cold which however has not given me much trouble and is in fact nearly well.  On Monday evening I went to a small dance at Mr J Atkinson’s a barrister of the northern circuit. I did not know him at all before but was invited to go by an acquaintance of mine of the name of Littler (also of the northern circuit) who had a commission to bring “eligible” men.  The affair was not particularly agreeable but I met one or two acquaintances as one is sure to do at a party at any lawyer’s house.  Except this I do not think I have any news to tell.

I have been reading &c industriously at chambers and going to morning & evening along Oxford Street and so have passed my days. Chas Thornely I saw the other day.   He is living with John and goes to Mr Cary’s studio.  I saw some of his sketches (in oils) which seem almost all sea pieces and liked them very much.  I should think he has decidedly some talent for painting but whether sufficient for the purpose of making it his profession I should have some doubt.

I hope you have not been troubled with your old enemy of late & have not been feeling too anxious about future prospects.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/156]

 

 

Letter from Henry Green to his cousin John Barcham Green

                                                                   Heathfield  Knutsford                                                  27 February 1858

Dear Sir

I am sending you by this Post a copy of my little book, the price of which is 3/6. Whatever you may think of the letterpress you will I am sure consider the frontispiece, - the note me langere very spirited and clever.  I hope however that you will like the book itself and from conviction and not simply from friendship give it your recommendation.  I shall be obliged by anything you can do to promote its sale as it was begun in the first instance with a benevolent object in view, about which I have expended some money, and if this jeu d’esperit be successful I shall get repaid.

It will give me much pleasure to stay a day or two with you when I visit Kent – which I hope will be within no very distant period.

With kind regards to Mrs Green and yourself

Believe me, yours very sincerely  

 Henry Green

There has been a delay in the publication, and the work did not come out before yesterday, so that you have it new from the mint.

[HMA 7/2/35 March 1858]

 

                                                                          Lincolns Inn                                                    March 2nd  /58

Dear Emily

I began a letter to you yesterday afternoon but the East winds a cold and a departed fire combined had such a doleful effect on the same letter that I determined to see whether 24 hours might not change the aspect of things.  The two inconveniences first enumerated still subsist but the fact of sitting near a thoroughly satisfactory fire makes such a difference in my “sentiments” that I have been able to rouse myself to letter writing with better hopes of succeeding.  Last week we had very painful weather dry east wind and driving dust and almost every one seemed afflicted with some kind of bronchial or snivelling affection.  The night before last I dined at the Jacksons.  Mrs J had been confined to bed for some days from the above cause and feeling sympathy for me recommended a mustard plaster which I applied.         As I understand is generally the case I fell asleep under the application which on awaking I found had most unmistakably operated.  However I find its operation tho’ momentarily unpleasant has been exceedingly beneficial.  Just at present the first thing I hear on awaking is most vigorous pianoforte practise going on next door.  Happily it is the practice of a more or less proficient professional and I have the benefit of listening to a satisfactory performance of the overture to Egmont &c & music of that class only slightly muffled by traversing a thin party-wall  or as the French I find all it “mur mitoyen”.   Mrs Jackson mentioned having received a letter from you within the last few days which she had been glad to do.  The pamphlet like book you forwarded to me is it seems the form of United States legislative reports which in our country appear in large blue folios.  It seems our friend Pettigrew is a member of the legislative party of S. Carolina & was appointed on a committee to report on taking measures for opening the slave trade with Africa for the supply of the American slave-states.  At present there is a law of congress & various treaties which prohibit & indeed treat it as piracy but it seems that some of the southern states have stirred the question of abrogating & withdrawing from these provisions.     Six of the committee were in   favour   of   such   a   course   and   the  minority  consisting  of  J Johnston Pettigrew presented a counter report showing the reasons against any such proceeding.  As he says the undertaking which the majority propose is quite a hopeless one and the objections to it from a humane & social point of view quite overpowering.

I saw the Powells some days ago and found them all well. Charley seems going on well at school & Harry tells me he has had one of the Holloway scholarships bestowed upon him.  I have nothing to complain of myself except want of business which does not seem to come this way.  However in most respects I am very pleasantly situated.  I received my father’s letter and the book which was sent on Saturday.

Believe me

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/157]

 

 

                                                                           Lincoln’s Inn                                                March 4th 1858

Dear Mother

I feel better today & feel as if I should go on.  The cold east winds have somewhat abated and indeed this morning was quite warm tho’ the ground was covered with snow. I assure you my own comfort is quite sufficient motive to make me take proper precautions to keep in good health.  I can always ride in an omnibus on bad mornings or when I am not quite well as these conveyances take me up & set me down very near both the termini of my morning journey.  I am sorry to hear of your attack of rheumatism and that you have been feeling the inclement weather.  The reason I did not mention “The Cat” was because my father had said that he had not yet mentioned it to you and I did not know whether this might not still be the case. I think it is decidedly amusing and contains plenty of “points” and I also think it is very appropriately   “got up”    tho’ the plates may not be in the highest style of art. I see no objection to acknowledging it but I should myself feel inclined to see first whether it is likely to take.

Why do you want my lodging address ?

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/158]

 

                                                                     3 Stone Buildings Linc. Inn                            March 10th 1858

Dear Mother

A few days intercession in the East winds has had the happy effect of procuring the entire departure of my cold so that you need not any longer feel any anxiety on my account. The reason however absurd  that influenced me in not sending the address where I lodge was that I was afraid you might pay me an unexpected visit as once before thinking I was worse than I was in reality. However now that I am quite well perhaps I may entrust this wonderful fact and tell you that I sleep at 1 Northumberland Place, Westbourne Grove, North Bayswater.  I should feel rather inclined in your position not to make a journey southward at this time of the year but if there is any summer excursion in prospect reserve yourself for that. However perhaps you are feeling that it is so long since you have paid a visit to Maidstone that it would be pleasant to do so before very long.  I have not yet seen any notice of The Cat in any of the periodicals I have looked into.  I have written a note to Dr Maine who contributes a good deal to the Saturday Review asking him to procure a notice of it there and I shall of course let you know if I see anything.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/159]

                                                            3 Stone Buildings                                        March 18th  /58

Dear Mother

The address of the Tea Merchants is Messrs Dixon Gibbs & Sons 119 Pall Mall S.W.  Yesterday I went to the Crystal Palace to see the eclipse but in common with the rest of the world was doomed to considerable disappointment.  During almost the whole time of the eclipse the sun & moon were both concealed by most provoking clouds and it was only at rare intervals and for a few moments at a time that the heavenly bodies in question were disclosed to view.  Today is very fine & warm and seems quite like the advent of spring.  I have not seen any notice of The Cat yet. I wrote to Dr Maine but he says he has no such connection with the Saturday Review as would enable him to procure a notice of any book. I think the only way that is adopted in reviewing books at least with the more respectable sections of the press is out of the books sent them they select for notice such as seem to them likely to interest their ordinary readers and that there is not any use to attempt by other means to have a notice inserted.  Indeed I do not think it is possible to have it done.

With best love to all

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/3     [Ref: JA/JPG/160]

 

 

                                                                           London                                                        March 31st 1858

Dear Mother

I think as my father will make so short a stay on his way through town that it would be difficult to convey to him the quantity of tea you wish sent, that I shall tell Dixon & Co. to pack up the parcel and send it by rail.  I should think that they will send such a quantity as 18lb to any part of England.  I shall most likely give the order this evening so that on Saturday or Monday you may expect its arrival if you hear nothing further.    I thought my father’s cough rather bad when he first arrived but the second day I saw him it seemed much better.  I shall not be going out of town at all this Easter but I shall not I think be at chambers after today till Monday.  I think I mentioned that I was going to Exeter Hall last Friday. We did not get very good seats being much too near and below the singers but still I enjoyed the evening very much as I think did Mrs and Miss Tayler. The former is rather a tiresome person to be with at musical entertainment as she makes so many remarks which might be spared. I cannot see any notice in any of the London papers of The Cat or I should have let you know. Mr James will I suppose go out of town for a few days tomorrow and the Courts of Chancery rise today till the week after next. This time last year I dare say Emily and Ellen will remember we were in Paris together.  Brandreth will probably have told you that we met this morning & he was in good time for the 10 train. The writing of the above is very bad as my hands are so cold and I am afraid the matter of it is not much better but this notwithstanding

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                            London                                                       April 12th  1858

Dear Mother

I suppose my father arrived safely at home tho’ I have not had any letter from you since he returned.  We have had very cold weather lately which has made everyone here feel rather uncomfortable and pinched.      However I hope we shall have an improvement in this respect.     Yesterday I dined with Mr Jackson who came up to town for a few days from Birkenhead where Mrs Jackson & the children are staying at present.  He seems to have a good deal of work to do and to be in good spirits about the prospects of the profession.  His father of course is a man of such influence that he gives his son a good deal of assistance in the way of his profession.  A good many young men at the bar seem rather complaining of want of business but you must not think by this that I am myself feeling discouraged for as yet I do not feel that I have any right to complain.  Term begins next Thursday & the courts sit again so that Mr James will be busy again. I am afraid my letter is somewhat unconnected as I have written in hurry & with talking going on about me but I thought I would send a line today.

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                            London                                                        April 17th  1858

Dear Father

I have been all this week at the Central Criminal Court listening to the trial of Bernard and very interesting work I have found it and decidedly more exciting than the ordinary matters discussed at the Court of Chancery. The trial closed this evening with a verdict of “not guilty” somewhat to the surprise of many persons who had heard the evidence but evidently to the great delight of a large portion of the bystanders.  I listened carefully to the evidence and cannot I confess at all reconcile its great gravity and generally clear character with the effect which the jury have declared it to have produced in their minds.  It seems to me an instance where a jury has been led away from the trial of the only issue which they had to deal with by the exciting and political nature of the considerations addressed to them.  E. James who made the chief speech for the defence expatiated in all kinds of irrelevant topics and his oratory tho’ abounding in coarse vigour and animal power is not of a character to appear to any but very uncultivated natures. However it seems to have carried the day as the defence produced no evidence at all and quite as I think failed to detect any material discrepancy or flaw in that produced by the prosecution. There seemed to be great excitement out of the Court in the neighbourhood of it and the cheering was very considerable.  We have had quite a change in the weather during the last few days and now it is quite warm.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                                London                                                     May 14th  1858

Dear Father

I returned to town last evening and do not delay sending an account of myself since Monday.  The Gaskells I found all at home and I spent a pleasant evening there.  There was not much business at the Court and neither at Manchester nor at Liverpool had I anything whatever to do. I am beginning to doubt whether it will be worth while to attend the Court much longer.  The persons from whom I might have hoped to get business either rarely have any in the Palatine Court or give it to counsel who have much better claim on them as well as longer experience than I have. On the other hand some of the elder men may be promoted or retire and so leave room for juniors and it is this chance that may make it advisable to continue my attendance at any rate for some time longer.  A further reason for not giving it up is that it furnishes at once an opportunity and an excuse for paying you a visit at Knutsford and brings me into contact with some of my friends in Manchester & Liverpool.

Tuesday & Wednesday nights I stayed at the Adelphi which I find a very comfortable and not any means expensive house.  I saw Philip Holt & Dr Broadbent with whom I renewed my former acquaintance but several other persons on whom I called I did not succeed in meeting.  I had a letter of introduction to the Catholic bishop of the diocese Dr Goss whom I saw at his residence St Edward’s College Everton. He received me very kindly and made my half hours visit pass very pleasantly. He has the reputation of being an active zealous man and by no means inclined to hold the reins of discipline with a loose hand. 

You have no doubt read the account of the sad accident on the Trent Valley Line. The Mr Ince whose name is mentioned among those of the injured was on his way to attend the Chancery Court as were several other barristers who were more fortunate than he was.  Among others Rupert Potter who joined the Court this last time was in the train but not in the slightest degree injured.  If I had not travelled on Saturday no doubt I should have been in the train and run the fearful chance with the others.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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The Adelphi

              

Adelphi Hotel Liverpool

 

 

                                                             London                                                           May 25th  /58

Dear Mother

I am sorry to hear that you have been laid up with illness.  I hope that some pleasant excursion for you will be brought about this summer and set you up again.  It is not the Mr Morgan who was killed in the Railway Accident that married Miss Reiss. On hearing of the accident in Manchester everyone was afraid it was as one account gave the name of Osborne and the other the name of Morgan and the barrister in question writes both Osborne & Morgan in his name.  But his brother in law telegraphed & found him all safe in London.  I have not found opportunity to call on the Miss Yates yet but I will do so soon if they are still in town. 

Mr Braithwaite sent me in a draft to draw for him he being engaged in the famous May Meetings and not much at chambers and with that and a case for opinion which I have had on my own account I have been quite busy the last two days.  I hear of one or two pieces of business as likely to come to me before long and so I am feeling quite in good spirits so far as I myself am concerned.   I think I mentioned to you that it had occurred to me to become a candidate for the Professorship of Jurisprudence at University College which will be vacant at the end of the present session.  I have got favourable testimonials from A Wills Mr Aspland Mr Braithwait Dr Maine Mr Eddis & Mr James and shall tomorrow send them in to the council with a formal application on my own account.     I dare say I may not succeed in getting the post but there can be no harm in trying for it.  The duties of it would not in the least interfere with the hours which I have to keep vacant for possible clients in the regular way and I think the holding of such an office might be an advantage to me.  Some day I will shew you the testimonials I have received.  The election I believe will be within the next few days and perhaps you need not mention the matter much till we know the result. 

Last Wednesday I was a partaker in the national holyday on Epsom Downs and witnessed that exciting scene the Downs on the Derby Day.  I went down to Esher the night before dined with P M Martineau W Greenhow & H Greenhow his brother who is a surgeon in the Indian Army and was in Lucknow all through that dreadful siege which the handful of Europeans so wonderfully resisted.  You may conceive that the latter had plenty to tell us.  Later in the evening Heath & J Thornely joined us & we had a game at quoits on the village green.  A Wills was in the meantime entertaining another party at his house in Esher.  In the morning the whole party which was increased by further morning arrivals & amounted to some 15 or 16 had breakfast together at the Bear Inn in Esher and at about 10 o’clock set off to walk over a most beautiful country fresh in the brightness of spring foliage to Epsom Downs.  Here of course a very different scene arose and the mingled hubbub & confusion of the most famous English race course on the occasion of the greatest race in the world presented itself to eyes & ears.  In the evening we walked back to Esher had a “tea” and returned to town the next morning by an early train.  Such is a most reasonable & inexpensive mode of visiting “The Derby”.

You do not say what number in Albion Street the Longs are going to take up their abode.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                             Lincoln’s Inn                                                   June 4th  /58

Dear Mother

When I wrote to you last I was under the impression that the appointment for which I have become a  candidate would be made within a short period.  Yesterday I received a note from the secretary to the college in answer to an inquiry of mine to say that the council would not probably meet to decide the business of the Professorship in question till the 3rd July.  I did not receive his letter in time to write to you yesterday so you see there is no need at present to be expecting any decision one way or the other.  You must not suppose that the emolument of the place is anything considerable. It is quite unendowed and the salary dependent on the fees of those who choose to attend the class and the number of this has not I believe lately amounted to more than 4 or 5.  But I think that the position may be useful & creditable to hold which is indeed the chief inducement in my having applied for it.  I send a copy of the testimonials I have sent in with the exception of Mr Eddis which I had not time to copy.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                              London                                                           June 12th  /58

Dear Mother

The reason I did not send the letter from Mr Eddis was the one I told you in my letter that I had not time to copy it.    The original is of course sent in & in the possession of the Secretary to the College & I do not suppose I shall have it again at any rate at present.  I should not have much doubt I think under the circumstances in writing to Mrs James Yates.  She is a somewhat odd but I think a kindly intentioned person and it might be that she would be glad to have Emily & Ellen staying at her house.  If you decide not to write to her or find that she cannot receive them I think the girls might stay at Mrs Jackson’s a little longer or how would it be to ask her if she could as conveniently receive them a week later.  It does not strike me as a matter about which there is very much difficulty.

I dined at the Jacksons on Thursday.  Mrs J’s younger sister is staying with them at present & one of Mr J’s  sisters also dined there.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                               Linc. Inn                                                    June 21st   1858

Dear Mother

I received Emily’s note this morning telling me that they will arrive this afternoon.  I could not very conveniently go to meet them at the station as they arrive so early in the afternoon.  Mr Jackson has invited me to dine there this evening so that I shall soon see them & I did not think they would have any difficulty in managing their departure from the station.

I am glad to be able to tell you that I received a letter this morning from the Secretary to University College to the effect that the Council on Saturday appointed me Professor of Jurisprudence from the end of the current session.  As I told you the office is not attended with any material emolument but I think it is one which is honourable in itself to hold and may be useful in several ways. 

I hope you will have a pleasant journey which as I hear has been changed into a trip to Whitby.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                         June 30th   1858

Dear Father

I am very glad to hear that you are enjoying Whitby so much and feel that the visit is doing you some good.  I had a “civil” note from Mr E Egerton yesterday mentioning that he had heard form you and was glad to hear of my appointment and giving me directions where to send the copies of the Euclid.  As he said nothing about my calling with the book I of course did not do so and this morning sent off the three copies to the addresses indicated.  I think Emily & Ellen quite enjoyed their visit as far as I could judge and that they are both looking well.    This evening I am going to a dance at Mrs Phipsons. I received an invitation about a fortnight ago.  I have had several bits of business lately but somewhat rare still they are. I shall be thinking of coming to Heathfield at the beginning of August.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                  3 Stone Buildings Linc. Inn                                  July 13th    /58

Dear Mother

I am very sorry indeed to hear of my dear father’s illness & your natural anxiety on his account.  I hope the case will not turn out more serious than the doctor tells you & you anticipate.  I think myself that the circumstances which you describe are accounted for by the cause which Dr. Merryweather assigns and I hope that my dear father will soon feel himself again & that you will make a pleasant & successful journey home. I shall hope in the morning to have a favourable account and with best love remain

Your affectionate son

J Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                              July 17th /58

Dear Mother

I was very sorry to hear of my father’s sprain and the uncomfortable ending which that & his illness must have made to your otherwise so pleasant and successful trip.  I hope that these untoward occurrences have not in any way neutralised the good effects of your sea side sojourn and that the latter only will remain. I went to London & N.W. Railway carriers this morning whom I found with some difficulty.  They undertook to call for the box at the Eddis’s some time today and forward it without delay to Chelford station.  I should have done this matter before but I have been so busy this week that I have not had an opportunity to go round and see about it & I did not know without inquiry what carriers to write to. On Wednesday at a dinner party at Mrs Chas Holts consisting of about 16 people tho’ described in the note as a friendly party. It was very pleasant the feeding part of the entertainment highly delectable and the talking part lively. We have hot weather returning again after two or three days wet.  I have no doubt the country is looking fresh.

I had nothing new on the business way.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            Liverpool                                                       Augt 11th 1858

Dear Mother

I am much obliged to you for sending my boots but the fact is that I am not in distinct want of them as I have a pair of thin boots & another of thin shoes with me as to the thick boots I do not want them at all as I have with me a pair much thicker than those left behind and which I intend having well nailed here in Liverpool before I leave. At the same time perhaps I should have told you that I expected a pair of boots by rail but that I did not want them sent on to me & I am much obliged for your trouble in the matter.  I shall sleep tonight and stay for a few days at the Thornelys 2 Blackburn Place which John invited me to do.  I find that Potter does not propose my going to Scotland before Monday and so I shall probably be here till then.    The letter  you  sent on  was  from  Mrs Shaen to  say  that a  friend of

Mr S’s one Mr Duerdin from Australia has a son about 15 for whom he wishes to find a companion to travel for about 2 months in Great Britain or on the continent paying his expenses but to start immediately.  If I had known of it before accepting the Scotch journey perhaps I might have fallen in with the proposition but I should not now care to pass that by and I think of writing this evening to say that such is the state of the case with me.  What do you think of the matter?   The choice of route and other details seems to be left quite to my discretion and if I had not had happened to have my time pretty well occupied this autumn with the Scotch journey & my visit home which of course I have not yet fairly made I should have rather enjoyed such a plan.  Let me have a line by return to say what you think.  I think at any rate of going to Scotland and suppose from Mrs S’s note that that would be in the way.  I have not had anything to do this Court.  The matter in which I have drawn some pleading was not yet ripe for being brought into Court and there is not on the whole much business. I had a pleasant visit at the Gaskells. Mrs G (who has just returned from a visit to Buxton) & Meta were the only persons I found at home Marianne was still at Buxton & Mr Gaskell came in the evening from a trip to the Isle of Man looking much better than when I last saw him.  I did not forget dear Emily’s birthday.

Yours very affectionately  

J Philip Green

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                                                            Liverpool                                                                Augt 16th  

Dear Mother

I have received a letter from Mr Shaen to say that his friend has already made arrangements in regard to his son.  I never seriously thought of accepting the proposal and the substance of my letter to him was that had I known of the plan earlier I should have been much inclined to fall in with it. I set off for Scotland tomorrow by steamer to Glasgow & thence by rail to Crieff.  I will if possible write from Glasgow on my arrival there on Wednesday morning so as to let you hear of my safe arrival. I have been chiefly occupied during the week in attending the assize courts.  A. Holt I saw yesterday but most of his family are away.      Alfred Thornely returned from the Lakes on Friday but William is still there.

I was sorry to hear that you have had your old enemy troubling you again. I hope my father is going on well.  I saw the Miss Yates’ & Anna yesterday.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

I forget whether I gave my address.  It will be E Potter Esq Aberuchill Castle Nr Crieff Perthshire

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                                                            Aberuchill                                                          August 21st    

Dear Mother

I arrived here on Thursday about noon & as the post leaves at a very early hour in the day have not yet found opportunity to dispatch a letter.  This is a most delightful place an old fashioned substantial house of some 250 years old with antlers and other trophies of sport hung about the walls, Thick well grown timber & plantations round the house and closed in at the back & sides by the mountains on which are found the chief matters of employment during the day.  In the house are at present Mrs Potter one of the Miss P,  Crompton P & Rupert P. Sir Charles Crompton & his eldest son, Mr Gaskell & Miss McNichol & Miss Bateson.  The judge besides being a very keen sportsman is a man of a very dry & shrewd turn and makes the party very entertaining.  The sporting has been pretty successful both days since I was here.  I have not gone out with them having no license and therefore thought it better not. Yesterday I was out all day fishing in the Ruchil a stream about two miles distant and had some pretty fair sport among the trout but the water was too clear to take any of the larger fish.  We dine at 6 and a considerable portion of the conversation is on the events of the day, the conduct of the dogs & any special peculiarities in the behaviour of the birds.  Mrs Potter is a kind pleasant person. Mr Potter is I believe coming next week.  I hope you are really improving.  I do not think this is a house that would suit you as I should be afraid it is damp & cold at most seasons of the year. 

I hear the party just preparing to set out for the day so I must conclude

With best love from

Your affectionate son

J Philip Green

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                                                            Aberuchill                                                         August 24th     

Dear Father

I was glad to receive my mother’s letter yesterday and to have some account of you all.  I have been very much enjoying my stay here. The neighbourhood is thoroughly beautiful and the valley between Comrie & St Fillans a place at the east end of Lock Earn & about 4 miles from here is as fine as anything I have seen.  The greater number of the party go out after breakfast to the moors and are not at the house till nearly six after which dinner & a pleasant evening accomplished.  I have not yet been on the moors with a gun as I scarcely like shooting without a licence and the fish have furnished me with very fair sport.  On Sunday afternoon we all went an expedition to Loch Earn and rowed and walked about and had tea there.  The lake is very picturesque high bold mountains on all sides and the lower parts down to the lake covered with wood.  Some of us are going again today to try the fishing there as the dogs and keepers have been pretty knocked up with the three hard days work they have had.

Mr Gaskell left yesterday intending to make a week’s pedestrian tour northwards and return by Glasgow. He was I think looking better than I have seen him for some time and the Judge seemed to enjoy his company.  The latter & his son are going in a day or two but are so much pleased with the place that they have thought of taking a house on Loch Earn and bringing Lady C. & the rest of the family to enjoy it with them.        I do not know when I shall return but I think probably in 5 or 6 days. I should have written before but really our days are so occupied that it is very difficult to snatch an opportunity.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

Mr Henry Booth the secretary to L & N W Railway a brother in law of Mrs Potter has arrived within the last two days. He seems a clever intelligent man but rather shy.

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                                                                Aberuchill                                                      August 27th     

Dear Mother

The time since my last letter has passed in much the same occupations as I then described to you.  The party here is somewhat smaller as it has been reduced by the departure of the judge & his son & yesterday Mrs Potter & Mr Booth.  Walter Potter & Oswald Wrigley have however arrived and today Mr Gaskell turned up again after a walking expedition of four days through the northern part of Perthshire.  Oswald Wrigley is greatly grown and tho’ he does not look quite strong is very different from what he was when I last saw him.  He has been out all day on the moors and seems to have stood the work pretty well tho’ somewhat severe. I have been chiefly occupied in fishing in which I have had pretty good success and have besides thoroughly enjoyed the pace & scenery.  Today I did not go out to fish but agreed to accompany Miss Bateson & Lucy Potter on an expedition they proposed to make by ascending Ben Conzie a mountain in the neighbourhood.  On further inquiries it was found to be too far & impracticable so that we went a drive and walked up the valley of the Lednock a crawling mountain stream which flows though a curious rocky gorge which the water has worn out in very fantastic shapes and holes. Tomorrow I suppose I shall be wetting my line again in the Earn or Kinchil.  All the Potters will be returning home before long for the marriage of the second Miss Potter with Edwin Wrigley which is to take place on the 14th.  I have not yet fixed when to return but I think about Tuesday or Wednesday. I hope you and my father are going on well and that I shall find you quite recovered when I return.

Rupert is not a very ardent sportsman & I think fonder of the rod than of the gun.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                               Aberuchill                                                  September 3rd

Dear Father

I have not quite arranged how I shall return home or indeed on what day but you may I think expect me about Monday evening. I have had some thoughts of travelling to Glasgow by way of Callander & the Trosacks but the weather has been so changeable lately that I fear I should see little of the scenery by a mere coach transit. Yesterday we went fishing to a small loch among the hills near Loch Earn and we had some good sport till it came on so wet that we were forced to make for home as speedily as possible.  The party here is very much smaller than it was & consists now of Rupert & Walter P, Oswald Wrigley & Miss McNicol &  Miss Bateson.  I feel that my stay here has done me a great deal of good in the way of laying on a further stock of health & animal strength and the invitation happened altogether very opportunely. I hope your ankle is going on favourably. I expect to find a great difference when I return home after a whole month absence.  The weather here seems quite broken and this week has been very showery but at times when the sun is out it is as pleasant as can be.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                           Lincolns Inn                                              October 13th   /58

Dear Mother

I only returned to town last night and at Bayswater found dear Emily’s note & here in Lincolns Inn this morning yours containing the intelligence about my father which I am very sorry indeed to hear.  If his power of reading & writing should be seriously interfered with & much more withdrawn altogether he will indeed have an infliction (sic) to bear with and one in his circumstances of the most difficult conceivable.  But I hope that he may be spared this extreme trial and that with care and such aids as science can furnish that he will not be debarred from intellectual occupations to which sight is so necessary.  I was much concerned also to hear from Emily’s note that you have not made much advance and though your letter gives a more favourable account than did hers yet I feel very sorry that you have so much to bear with in point of bodily weakness.  I wish so much that it could have been managed to you to have a visit to Harrogate or elsewhere but as you carefully considered the matter let us hope it was for the best and that brighter days are yet in store.  I have often thought of you dear Mother during the last 8 or 9 days though no correspondence has taken place between us and offered up my unworthy prayers for you.  I did not talk to you about my intention of going to Windsor till the last moment partly because I did not suppose you would care to hear about it and partly because I wished to know your determination about going to Harrogate. If that had been considered advisable & necessary it would have been easier for you to ask me to go with you in default of any one else being able to than if I had told you that I had a plan in view at the same time on my own account.  I feel myself to have profited greatly by a week of religious retirement under the direction of those whose constant aim & purpose it is to discover & realise in their own practice the spirit & fruits of Christian perfection. Wishing my best love to my sisters

Believe me

Yours very affectionately 

J Philip Green

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                                                  3 Stone Buildings Linc. Inn                                     Oct 22nd  /58

Dear Father

You cannot tell how sorry I was to hear of your anxiety on account of your sight.  I should have written some days ago but perhaps rather absurdly I thought of waiting to hear what my mother did in reference to Harrogate.  I suppose you are not prevented from reading and writing during the day but only that you have to be careful of your eyesight.  Still it is very unpleasant to have any anxiety about so necessary an organ as the eye.  I have begun to set to work upon my lectures and expect that it will be quite as much as I can do to have them ready by the time.  However when once the general outline is laid & I possess a fair knowledge of the detail to begin with I do not anticipate that it will be a greater piece of work than I can manage.  I have not had any papers sent me as yet and in that respect do not stand so well as last year when I found some waiting me on my arrival in town on the 18th.  Mr James has been here for a day but has gone back to the country and the inn has not assumed the busy air which it will wear in ten days.  How is my grandmother going on?  When you write again will you send the Powell’s address as I wish to see them.  I hope my dear mother is better or if she is gone from home that you have encouraging accounts of her.  I have nothing particular to tell of myself and wish I could send you a more interesting letter but I have been feeling anxious & wondering how you are all going on when perhaps you were thinking that I should write.

Give my best love to my dear mother & the girls & believe me

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                            Oct 30th 1858

Dear Mother

I hope when you next write you will be able to give a better account of yourself and of all those who have been ailing than your last letters contained.  We have quite a touch of approaching winter today and the water in the morning felt unusually fresh. However my own experience quite confirms the favourite theory nowadays that to keep free from colds there is nothing like cold water.  I shall have to make my debut as lecturer next Monday week. I have not yet heard of any entries for the class but at any rate the first lecture will be delivered as it has been announced pursuant to the directions of Mr Atkinson the college secretary & with my consent in several of the papers.  As it will be intended as an introductory lecture I dare say I shall have some kind of audience if only of old friends.  The plan of an introductory lecture has rather led me to alter my arrangement as it will be better to make it more general & to aim at a somewhat higher literary standard than would have been necessary had the lecture been nothing more than the first of a series to a regular class.  Mr James has returned again and has papers pouring in but as yet none have been deposited at my door.  J  Thornely came back to town on Thursday & called on me this morning.  He is looking very well & has I think had a pleasant vacation first in Brittany & since in England. Heath & Wills have been exploring “the high Alps” again and this time have ascended Mount Blanc & Monte Rosa the latter I suppose a much more considerable feat than the former.  I think you made inquiries as to my dormitory. I found it looking very clean & neat as it had been undergoing a thorough cleaning and the house generally seemed to have been “renovated”. At this time of dearth of general news Mr Bright’s Birmingham speeches seem to be the chief topic of talk in town and most persons that I have heard mention them condemn their violence & half truths.  But there is no question that they are exceedingly eloquent & telling speeches and must have great effect on a large class of Englishmen.  I do not think I have seen any of your friends yet and so have nothing of that kind to tell.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                   3 Stone Buildings Linc.Inn                                        Nov 6th /58

Dear Emily

I hope you have quite rid yourself of your cold which I was sorry to hear had been visiting you. There has I think been a considerable amount of affliction of the same kind among the London population at least judging by the noise of coughs wherever there is anything like an assembly of persons. I have been busy this week working at my lecture for Monday. I find it a much greater piece of work than I anticipated to write a composition that will read for an hour with some amount of pleasure given and at the same time be a solid production. After the first two or three lectures I shall have to descend to matters of detail & particular questions which of course are much easier to treat satisfactorily.  I have not yet heard whether there have been any students entering the class.  Among other persons Mr Charles Tagart who stopped me in Lincolns Inn the other day and told me of the sad loss his family had had in Mr E Tagart.  I had seen the death announced in the Times, and so was aware of the event. He then said he had seen my lectures announced and asked if I would admit him as an occasional hearer.  I told him of course by all means so that perhaps I may have a few volunteers at intervals if no regular students.  The gay world of London has of course not made its appearance again and the west end still looks deserted & depopulated but in these eastern regions there is an air business and action. Have you seen by the papers that de Montalbert & the editor of the Correspondent are to be prosecuted on account of an article by the former inserted in last month’s number of the periodical.  The number itself was seized but my copy had I suppose been sent off before the seizure took place so that I have had the pleasure of reading it. The subject of the article as nominally the great Indian Debate in the Houses of Parliament but the whole is a running panegyric of England and her Institutions and continual hits at the contrast presented by the system on the opposite of the channel. It is certainly a very bold production and one which would have been visited with perhaps somewhat summary treatment in the case of a humbler & less influential person than the writer is. I am afraid the poor “correspondent” will not have a very long existence as this the third time it has got into trouble and after three “warnings” a periodical may be summarily suppressed.  I am going to dine at Tulse Hill with Mead Martineau tomorrow & talk over our respective autumnal expeditions.  I have seen R Potter who tells me that the sport both with gun & rod at Aberuchill has been very fine indeed since I left.

With best love   

Yours very affectionately 

J Philip Green

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                                                            Lin.Inn London                                                Nov 11th  /58

Dear Ellen

I believe the Chancery Court will sit at Manchester or Lpool on Saturday the 27th and I shall probably pay you a visit on the following Tuesday. I shall have to return on Thursday as there is a college examination on Friday Dec 3rd at which my presence will be necessary.  The next Court after Christmas will be early in February & if the parties or party happened to be about that time it would be pleasant to do two things on the same journey. But if that would not do and my presence is really wanted I dare say I can manage to come over early in January.  It must be before the 10th as term begins then here in London and of course I must be here then.  I had not a very numerous audience on Monday night and so you will not be surprised to learn that I did not feel much affected by the “situation”. Martineau & Thornely came to hear me and Howard & Howley two law friends & a few others whom I did not know.  A good many friends had said they would come but I suppose forgot or had some better engagement. I was rather afraid that what I had written would not last an hour but I found the time passed more quickly than I expected and I gave an hour and quarters lecture. I think Thornely and Martineau liked my lecture. I do not know yet whether there are any actual entries or in fact whether I shall have to lecture at all but I intend to go on if there is any attendance at all whether students or visitors as it will be a good thing to have to write out the lectures and will greatly improve myself.  We had a meeting of the Convocation of the Univ. of London yesterday at which discussion of very respectable warmth took place but I could hardly explain the points at issue within any reasonable compass.  There must have between 2 & 3 hundred men present.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                             3 Stone Buildings Linc.Inn                                            Nov 24th /58

Dear Mother

I shall be in Manchester on Friday afternoon and think of staying the night at Winkworths. I shall come over to Knutsford on Saturday afternoon and stay with you till Sunday evening when I have to leave for Liverpool to be in time for Monday morning. It would not be very convenient to come to Knutsford after Liverpool as I want to be here on Wednesday again.  The last few days here have been of the most pinching kind in regard to weather I scarcely remember such weather in November.  I am afraid I shall not escape a cold as I feel its approach which is unpleasant with a prospect of a journey to the north before me in a few days.  I hope I shall find you better when I come on Saturday than when I left you in October.  I had some work last week from Mr Johnson of Faversham whom my father knows about and I think I shall have small matter at the Manchester court on Saturday. I shall have I think “two” regular students in my class at the college.  On looking back on the list of this class for past years I do not find that the numbers have ever exceeded 5 or 6 except in the time of Mr Austin the first professor. In the time of Dr Graves & Mr Hargreave the class was often no larger than it is now so that there is no reason to be disappointed.  Every third year I expect there will be a good class as there is scholarship in jurisprudence given very 3rd year and the competitors are required to have attended the jurisprudence class during the preceding year. This scholarship has only lately been established & is given for the first time next month so that its establishment may have some material effect in promoting the study of the subject in the college.  I do not think I have any news of any friends to give you.  I had dinner with the Bagshawes at Barnes on Saturday week and last Sunday with the Jacksons who seemed all well & flourishing.  Mrs J & the children are going to stay some time in Cheshire next month. I suppose at Chester & Birkenhead. She asked after Emily and the rest of you very kindly.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                             Lincolns Inn                                                       Dec 1st/58

Dear Father

I write to tell you that I arrived safely in town last night.  There was pretty well of business at Lpool but nothing for me.  The Court was over yesterday afternoon and the V.C. & greater part of the bar returned to town the same evening. I saw the Holts among our Lpool friends.  I called to Alfred in the morning and he asked me to dine in the evening (Monday) which I accepted.  I had a pleasant evening the party consisting of Mr & Mrs, Miss, Alfred & Robert Holt. They inquired kindly after all at Knutsford & mentioned having seen you at Lpool recently.  I have been engaged this morning in making out the paper of questions for the Jurisprudence Examination which is on Friday and have just dispatched it to the printers.  There will be three candidates I hear for the scholarship so that the task of looking over the papers will not be quite so laborious as it would have been with a greater number and indeed in the circumstances Mr Atkinson would be glad if I could decide before Saturday afternoon that the result may be announced at the Council meeting that afternoon.

With much love I remain

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                               London                                                              8th Dec /58

Dear Mother

I am sure so far as I am concerned myself I shall quite join in the lamentation over the given up dances but of course under the circumstances they could scarcely be thought of. I think that the Knutsford parties are very enjoyable & quite as good of their kind as those to be had elsewhere and the girls will feel it rather provoking to lose this bit if gaiety & the friends’ whom such an event brings to our house. I had unfortunately written to Heath the very day before your letter arrived but I have not heard from him in reply. It is just possible he may not be able to come and then it will be all “square” but if he accepts I suppose all that can be done will be to write to him explaining how matters stand. Would you like any visitors in the absence of “the parties”?   I think as I shall have to be in the north at the end of January I should scarcely like to travel to Knutsford in the early part of the month unless there is some special reason.  But if you are still thinking of any visitors for whom you would like my being at home I dare say I could manage a journey.  My pupil whose name is Pennethome has come to me regularly for an hour a day since Wednesday week and will continue to do so till next Wednesday when he goes to Cambridge for his examination.  He is a sharp clever man who quite kept his teacher up to the mark.  Several days ago I had a letter from an oxford student named Brunel and I believe a son of the engineer wishing to read Roman Law with me during the Christmas vacation from the 15th instant to the middle of January.  I do not know who recommended him to apply to me. I have some papers in at present to write an opinion upon and perhaps draw a bill and next Wednesday I have to make a motion before the Master of the Rolls so that with my lectures I have quite as much as I can do.  I did not lecture last Monday as the examination had been on the Friday & I had not time to write a lecture.  Are there any plans for Christmas at Knutsford in the absence of the parties which have fallen through.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            Lincolns Inn                                                      Dec 18th /58

Dear Annie

I received a letter from Heath two days ago to the effect that he is unable to leave home during the early part of January on account of various birthdays which fall at that time and which have to be kept with proper solemnities & in the presence of all relatives. He seemed quite sorry to have to decline again and hoped that sometime in the spring or autumn I would ask him to Knutsford or would myself call at Warwick in the course of a journey to or from London.  It would certainly be much easier to get people to Knutsford for a party if things were fixed some time beforehand but I suppose it could not be avoided.  If the time is to be altered an earlier time would do for me much better than a later one.  As I told you in my former letter term begins on the 11th of January & I should not like to be out of town then. I have not mentioned the matter to R Potter yet but I expect his position in this respect is just like my own & that he would not be willing to come later than the first week or ten days of January. How would it be if the party could be had at the end of January or early in February. It would perhaps scarcely do for you to propose it but as Aunt Long seems in some measure to consider my movements & the friends I could invite it might be possible that she would feel inclined to postpone the business.  But now I remember that the end of January would not suite you and so that will not do.

I am sorry to hear of my mother’s rheumatism I hoped that she had had enough illness for the year

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            Lincolns Inn                                                      Dec 23rd /58

Dear Mother

In spite of the “discouragement” which you seem now to throw in the way of my coming to Knutsford I shall not quite give it up myself as I want to be at the parties whether they are small or large hops. As my last letter told you I should have a difficulty in coming on the 25th & 26th but I have never had any for the 5th or 6th and if it is  desired  I  dare say  Potter  would  come  then.      How  would  it  be  to  ask  O.O. Wrigley. Having renewed acquaintance with him at Abaruchill I should like to do so if you approve. But whatever your wishes are in this respect I quite intend coming to Knutsford if the parties are fixed for the 5th & 6th. I have no more time to write but with much love wish you all a right merry Christmas & many of them

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                               London                                                          Dec 29th  /58

Dear Mother

I think on the whole I had better give up the plan of coming to Knutsford at present. I do not much expect that Mr Potter could come over at present and as I told you Heath has sent me a letter saying that he is engaged.  Then my pupil Brunel wants as much of my time as I can give him at least for an hour a day so that on the whole I think I had better not come next week.  In that case I should try to leave town on Saturday the 29th January and stay with you till the Tuesday evening or Wednesday morning following. I have had a deed to draw this last week from Mr Charles Tagart who has once or twice hinted at “employing” me and has now made a beginning but I do not of course know whether he intends doing so regularly. I am going to dine on New Year’s Day with Mr Jas Yates who invited me to join their family party on that day.  I had a very pleasant Christmas day which I spent with “a person” at Bayswater.

Believe me dear Mother

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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               Lincoln’s Inn                                                      Jany 8th /59

Dear Mother

I will see about the screens and also the photographs which you mention.  I also saw the notice of them in the Times and thought from that they would be rather a tempting object to possess I had a pleasant dinner at Highgate.   The party consisted of Mr Ashton Yates Mrs L D’Eyncourt & Miss Eliza Yates Dr Mr & Miss Roget & two or three gentlemen.  Miss Roget asked after my Aunt Long & the Yates’ after their friends at Knutsford generally.  Mr James Yates seemed very well and active but Mr Ashton Yates is I fear growing feeble & less interested in what is going on around him. I have nothing particular to tell this week. I was sorry that you were not able to go to Manchester to Mrs G’s as it so often happens that you are prevented when anything of the kind offers itself.  Mr James has come back from his Christmas visit at his brother in laws  Ld Belpers looking very blooming & happy & greeted me with the compliments of the season in a very hearty manner.

I received my father’s letter & will do what I can about it.          I know a man named Hunter a son of Mr Hunter a deputy keeper of the Public records.  The father is a great antiquarian & genealogist and his son tells me is specially interested in the subject of Emblems.  I have asked the son to get me some information on the inquiries so that if any such is to be got we are at least likely to be put on the right track.

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                3 Stone Buildings Linc.Inn                                        Jany 24th /59

Dear Mother

I think I may say that I shall be with you early on Saturday evening & shall stay till Tuesday evening. There is only one thing that will prevent me coming but which is not very likely to happen viz that I have any business in Court on Saturday or Monday. I called on Mr Aspland this morning and told him what you suggested.  He seemed glad to hear of it and said he would mention it at home & let me know but he thought it was a good opportunity for his daughter to take of a convoy. I have not had much to do lately and have consequently been feeling rather dull but have had nothing to complain of in the way of health.  I am going to a party at the Austins’ this evening a dance I suppose as it was a three weeks invitation.  The lectures go on satisfactorily but reading to two men is rather a pretence of a lecture.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                            Lincolns Inn                                                     Jany 28th /59

Dear Mother

I have heard from Mr Aspland to the effect that Mrs A finds that she will be scarcely able to get Emily ready to go on Saturday and is therefore obliged to decline my offer of a convoy.  I find I shall scarcely be able to leave by the early train tomorrow and as there is no train in the middle of the day which stops at Chelford I have determined to leave by the 5 p.m. train and take a car from Chelford. This train is mentioned as arriving at Chelford at 9.45 so that you may expect me at Heathfield between 10 and 11.  The photographs I shall not be able to bring. They say at Colnaghis that they have had so many copies to make and that at this time of the year the available day for photography is so short that they will not be able to let me have a set soon enough to take with me.  So I shall have to see about them before my next visit.  The screens I shall bring with me also some tea.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

Since writing the above Mr James has invited me to dinner tomorrow to meet one of the Romillys & so I think I shall put off coming tomorrow. I see there is a train on Sunday which leaves at 10 & gets to Chelford in the afternoon and so I think I shall travel by that.

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                                                              London                                                           Feby 7th 1859

Dear Mother

I find myself here in Lincoln’s Inn again after an uneventful journey.  The plan of taking the first train to Crewe & then changing for the faster train works very well and as you get a ticket from Chelford for the whole distance is very little more trouble than the former state of things.  Mr Houghton & the two Mammatty were in the omnibus to Chelford and with four other sizeable persons we filled the vehicle completely & almost unpleasantly.  I do not find that London has been particularly inconvenienced by my week’s absence. I feel to have enjoyed my journey & visits home very much even had their been no unusual source of attraction there.  As term begins tomorrow I hope I shall have “avocations” sufficiently pressing to assist me in dispelling recollections of so interesting a character.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                           Lincoln’s Inn                                              19th Febry 1859

Dear Mother

I went to the warehouse of Heal & Son this morning to see the articles mentioned in your note.  The drawers seemed to me quite satisfactory wares well made & nice looking and did not shew the contents of the lower drawers when a higher one was taken out.  As to the chairs (all of which had the fault of which you spoke viz that the tops touched the wall when placed against it) the beech ones were strong respectable chairs not of course very ornamental or highly finished.  The birch ones were much better in form & finish & had better cane bottoms but the man said that the beech & birch were about the same as to strength and that the difference lay in the shaping & finish.  He also said that their chairs are never made so that the feet touch the wall without the top doing so & that he had never heard any objection made on that account before.  I told him that the objection was made and reasonably enough on the ground that the tops knock off the paper or otherwise disfigure the wall. He said some might be made without this if it is desired. I am going to dine at Mr Aspland’s this evening & am just in time to scribble this note before going to meet him at his chambers.

With best love to all

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                                                                    London                                               24th March 1859

Dear Mother

I had  a note  from  Mr Aspland o n Tuesday  morning from Liverpool & from an allusion it contained I

supposed that poor Miss Bennett* was dead.  It was a great pity that for the last few years of her life she caused herself so much inconvenience and doubtless illness.  Do you know whether she had any relations and were any of them if she had any at the funeral and did they see the will?  So far as I remember she told me she had no near relatives except one or two cousins whom she had scarcely ever seen and had little regard for.  As to the legacy duty I think it must clearly be paid. The duty payable on debts which the Testator expressly releases by his will as being benefits & in that point of view legacies.  In this case of course my father benefits to the extent of £160 by the fact that he is residuary legatee and I think duty must be paid accordingly.  The principle that legacies cancel debts has no bearing on the question of […] duty.    The Faversham church case has been commenced. A bill which I drew was filed this morning and on Saturday we are going to move in the Rolls Court for an injunction to stop the works of which my client one of the church wardens complains.  I am sorry to hear that dear Annie’s house is not quite right again.     It has been a long  business &  rather  wearying

I dare say.

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

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*[Mary Ann Bennett of Nether Knutsford spinster died 19th March 1859 and in her will she left to the trustees of the Protestant Dissenters Chapel Brook Street in Nether Knutsford to be applied as they think proper for the benefit of the Chapel £200. To the Reverend Jodeph Ashton of Preston Dissenting Minister for the benefit of the Chapel £100. The rest of the estate she left to Rev Henry Green of Heathfield Over Tabley his heirs etc and appointed him the executor of the will. It was sworn at under £800. Original now at JRL]

 

 

                                                                           Lincoln’s Inn                                                9th  April  1859

Dear Mother

I am afraid that I like you tho’ perhaps with less ground of excuse have to charge myself with neglecting my correspondence to Knutsford.  I have been rather busy but still not so busy as not to have time to write a few letters as is proved by the fact that I took a whole holyday on Wednesday and enjoyed the bright warm sunshine at the Sydenham Palace. I was sorry to hear this morning by Ellen’s letter of the death of Fanny Merriman.  She always seemed to me a kindly & sweetly disposed girl and I dare say her loss will be much felt at home.  Last Friday I was in the city & called at Wm Roscoe’s office.  I did not know beforehand that he had been so dangerously ill as they told me he then was & his clerk said they scarcely hoped for his recovery.  I had not heard of his death till Ellen’s letter this morning nor indeed of Mr Tom Roscoe’s but the latter was in the Times this morning. What an unfortunate family the Roscoes have been in regard to its male members at least all dead except Edward & Alfred.   The Faversham case did come into court but did not occupy ten minutes & is not of course mentioned in any paper.  The Master of the Rolls thought our side had not applied soon enough & he therefore would not make any order then till the other side had had time to give their views of the question. So it will probably come on again next Friday or Saturday.  I hope the Plt will succeed and I think he is in the right but I am by no means absolutely certain of success.  The M.R. I thought rather sneered at the case but perhaps he will take another view when it is properly explained.  It seems rather startling at first to maintain that Geo. Gilbert Scott the famous architect does not know how to face a church with stone without endangering the security of the fabric itself but that is what the Plt has to maintain.  I have had a few other morsels of business lately some on my own and some on Mr Jackson’s account.  Tonight I am going to Burlington House to a meeting of the Royal Society to which I was bidden as a professor by a card received form the President of said society about a fortnight ago.  I have no notion what sort of an affair it will be probably an assembly of heavy scientific big wigs where I shall feel very much a stranger & out of my element.  I saw Edward Watkins on Thursday. He is living at Wimbledon at present but comes to town every day to read in a conveyancers chambers in Gray’s Inn.

With best love  

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

I shall be in Knutsford somewhere between the 14th & 22nd May.  I cannot at present say exactly what day but probably about he 19th or 20th 

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Letter from Henry Green to John Barcham Green his cousin

                                                                  Heathfield   Knutsford                                             April 20 1859

My dear Sir

I do not know what your political bias may be at the present moment but I take the liberty of recommending, if they need recommendation, the claims of Mr Charles Buxton to your consideration as a candidate to represent Maidstone.  I have very little personal acquaintance with him, but as the son in law of Sir Henry Holland Bart he is often mentioned to me and from his votes, speeches in parliament, and character regard him as one every way qualified to take his place again in the House of Commons.  Should you agree with me in these opinions I shall be glad to hear that you have given him your vote and interest, and should you differ from me, you will I am sure excuse my naming to you a candidate whose character is worthy of his descent and connexions.

Will you make my kind regards to Mrs Green, and believe me.

Yours ever sincerely

Henry Green       

[HMA 7/2/49]

 

                                                            London                                                             7th May 1859

Dear Father

I have intended writing to you to acknowledge having received your book on Knutsford* for some days past. I am not aware that I have been remiss in writing lately as my mother’s letter this morning seems to imply.   I think that I wrote to Annie or one of the girls within the last fortnight. I have not been out of town at all this Easter.   I wrote to my Aunt Louisa as you suggested and should have been glad to pay Maidstone a visit during Easter week but I received a note from her saying that during the early part of the week she was obliged to be in town & that on Wednesday after the return of their girls their house would be quite full. I was at the Ashton Yates last Friday evening at quite a family party Mr & Mrs L D’Eyncourt, Mr H Musgrave the Ashton Bostocks &c. Nothing particular took place & indeed the object of my going there was to speak with them on some matters of business and Mr Asthon Y wanted me to go when Mr D’Eyncourt was there. I have had a few evenings out lately in the Bayswater region at the houses of acquaintances there. Mr & Mrs Feetham & Mr & Mrs Kynaston. Mrs Kynaston was a Miss Peel and in some way connected with the Willocks & Fletchers but I could not quite make out how.  I like the getting up of your book very much & think that it contains a great deal of interesting & curious matter.  Mr Ashton Yates wanted to have a copy & asked me if you would send him one direct or he would get one in London.  J Thornely also had heard about it & intended getting one.

With best love

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

As to your idea that I wrote Excelsior I may observe that the only reason for my sending the Review was that I happened to buy it. I did not write any thing in it nor have I any distinct recollection what the piece referred to was.

*[Knutsford Its Traditions & History]

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                                                            Lincoln’s Inn                                               13th May   1859

Dear Mother

I am thinking of travelling Knutsfordwards on Sunday I hope to arrive about 5 p.m.  I should have preferred to leave tomorrow but there is a soiree of the Royal Society tomorrow evening which I should like to attend as I found the first one interesting.  I have not yet heard of any business at the Court but it is possible there may be something for me at Manchester.  The Court sits at Manchester on Tuesday and at Liverpool Wednesday & Thursday.  I hope I shall see the Miss Yates but I do not think I can call before my return to town. I can assure you that there is no cause for anxiety in regard to my bodily health and I hope you will think so when you see me.  We have had a great deal of east wind during the last 3 weeks but the sun is generally so warm at least in the after part of the day as to render them more tolerable than the ordinary run of London East winds.  I passed an evening at the Charles Tagart’s in Bayswater on Tuesday & last night I went to the Drury Lane Opera which is this year very good tho’ no doubt not quite up to the Covent Garden mark.  There has been a quarrel in the Chancery Court this last week between Mr Gye the proprietor of the latter establishment and Mr Smith of Drury Lane as to which of them is entitled to the services of Signor Graziani the baritone.  The result was that the Court ordered that the signor should not open his mouth for singing purposes except for his own private amusement anywhere in London but in Mr Gye’s theatre.  They do not actually attempt to order him to sing for Mr Gye but exclude him from singing anywhere else.  In France I have read of the Paris Courts compelling a singer to perform his contract by singing and perhaps the artist’s care for his own reputation would make him exert his powers when once on the boards.  But in England we do not go quite so far as this.  London seems very full notwithstanding the dissolution of parliament which was expected to break up the season so sadly for those who minister to the luxuries & fancies of the superior order of the species.  It is thought however that so much of the spare cash of these persons has been spent in electioneering up & down the country that the London shopkeepers will take less of it than usual. Mr James is gone to pay a visit to his relatives at Swansea & I dare say would have preferred to go down as a new made M.P. but the sweet voices of the Derby electors have willed otherwise.  He has certainly been very unlucky with his election undertakings

With best love

Believe me

Yours very affectionately

J Philip Green

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                                             London                                                             31 May 1859

Dear Emily

I hope you are profiting by the rain & warm weather which we have had in town.  The trees & grass look vastly benefited here.  Tomorrow I am going to Epsom to witness that great national event the race for the Derby.  I have generally gone down the evening before to Esher & then spent the evening in a numerous circle of friends. In the morning we set off to walk across the country to the race ground (about 6 miles) & then home in the evening. But this time I am thinking of joining the party tomorrow travelling down by rail & meeting them tomorrow at Epsom & then in the evening to Esher.  There was a pleasant soirée of the Society of Arts at the Kensington Museum on Saturday to which I was accompanied by Miss Tagart.  The objects of beauty or curiosity were so plentiful that it made me very regretful that I had not often paid the place a visit for of course on Saturday evening it was almost impossible to examine them.  There was an immense crowd of people several thousand I should think.  The chief occupation was walking about & looking at one another & listening to a military band.  The Lord Chancellor his lady & daughter I noticed among the people also V. Chanc.Wood.  I have been sitting in Court the last two days listening to that lengthy case of Lord v Colvin which is again under the course of hearing. I hear Mr Jackson has returned from Canada & I sincerely hope he will return within the next day or two and relieve me of the matter tho’ as there are two other counsel on the same side with Mr J there is not any responsibility on the third.  I had to do with the case so recently that I have never fairly penetrated it & do not think of making any speech so that I hope on all accounts that he will return before our side has its turn to be heard.

Your holydays are coming nearer at which no doubt you are rejoiced.

With best love

Your affectionate brother

J Philip Green

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                                                            London                                                             11 June 1859

Dear Mother

I have seen the Gaskells several times since their arrival in Bayswater.  They have I think pleasant quarters in Kildare Terrace but I should fear they will find the distances rather great for moving about much.  They seem all looking well I think except perhaps Mrs G.  On Wednesday evening I went to an “At home” at Mrs Wedgwoods which I enjoyed.  The chief entertainment was singing which was executed by performers professional as well as amateur.  The second Miss W. has a very pleasant voice and so far as I can judge decided vocal talent.  She & MA sang a trio with an Italian professional gentleman which was a success.  Previously to going to the Wedgwoods I had been to Brixton to dine with Mr Clifford of the Middle Temple who perhaps I have told you married a sister of Miss Masons,  our old friend now Mrs Van W. was there very little altered from what I remember of her when at Heathfield.  She is a lively rather entertaining person but somewhat of a gossip I should say.  This day week I was favoured with a call from Mr Milnes Gaskell.  The immediate object of his call was to give me a message for you about Dr Brandreth’s portrait.  He said that he had several copies of the proof issue and that you are quite welcome to one of them.  He says that they have no margin and recommends you to let him have one of them framed for you but wished to know whether you would like it so or desired to have it in a portfolio.  I said I thought you wished to have one to hang up but that I would write & inquire.  He seemed desirous of making my acquaintance as he talked of asking me to dinner after Whitsuntide & offered to get me into the Ho. of Commons if I ever desired it.  He asked if I had a brother called Henry who had written on Knutsford.  He had seen my father’s book and I told him of course that he was the author. He has a somewhat peculiar manner but I think he is a kind of man I shall manage to get on with & am of course rather glad to have an opportunity of making acquaintance with that branch of our connection.      In a professional way I have been very slack since I returned from the North. I have finished my lectures & shall therefore be quite ready for almost any amount of business if it would but come.

With best love 

Yours very affectionately    

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/4     [Ref: JA/JPG/199]

 

                                                            London                                                           18th June 1859

Dear Father

I was sorry to hear that my dear mother & Emily have been suffering in different ways from the weakness of the flesh.  Florence Gaskell told me about them in the first instance and then my mother’s note gave me further intelligence.  I cannot help thinking that if you are to have such a quiet time during the vacation as there seems a probability will be the case it would be much more prudent to manage some real change of scene & society for at any rate some among you. I am glad to hear that your lecture went off favourably.  I was not able in any way to contribute to your intelligence.  I did look for the point you mentioned some time ago but I could not find anything in the Brit. Mus. Library.

It is said that a principal difficulty in the way of making Sir Rich. Bethell Lord Chancellor (a promotion not only well deserved but which would have been very well received by the legal profession generally) was that he required his peerage to be limited to his second son.  The eldest son is it is said a sad scamp and has been through the Insolvent Court more than once and the father was unwilling that his peerage should descend upon such an unworthy representative.  I have not seen any positive objection made to Lord Campbell personally but the appointment of Common Lawyers three times running to the highest Equity Judicial position is by no means grateful to the class who practice at Lincoln’s Inn.  I have seen the Gaskells several times and yesterday conveyed the party across Kensington Gardens to the S. Kensington Museum where we spent the morning.  Mrs & Meta went to a Hallé Concert & the rest went home & I into town.  From what M A said recently I gathered that she had written to Ellen but that her letter was a very shabby one. She said that they really find very little time for writing letters but that she would write at greater length before long.  I have not seen or heard anything more from Mr Milnes Gasell but shall wait a little yet before writing to him what my mother said. Hoping that the next time you write you will be able to send a more favourable account.

I remain

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/4     [Ref: JA/JPG/200]

 

                                                                           Lincoln’s Inn                                                June 23rd 1859

Dear Mother

I had an almost solitary & very dusty ride to London & after a few hours sleep in bed in addition to those I had managed to get on the way made my appearance at chambers again.  The only matter I found requiring my presence were some papers from Mr Johnson so that my speedy return to town was not altogether unnecessary.  I had a chat with Mr James who also returned to chambers this morning. He has paid a visit to his house in Surrey since holding his Court in Lancashire.  I posted Annie’s letter at Crewe but hope that she has heard something from Liverpool this morning about her order.  London looked exceedingly cheerless this morning at 5 0’clock with a cold east wind blowing the dust about but the afternoon is much warmer.  I found my father’s coat a great comfort. I hope I shall observe your wishes for a more plentiful & free correspondence between us and I am sure it has always been my desire but you know how apt one is unless naturally fond of letter writing to put off doing so when there is plenty of time for writing what one feels and then the letter written in a hurry appears very cold & meagre. This is really the reason & explanation of my defaults & neglects in the matter and I hope I need not assure you there is no other one.

With best love

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

JRL Box 3/4     [Ref: JA/JPG/201]

 

                                                            London                                                             5th July 1859

Dear Father

I am very sorry to hear from you that my dear grandmother* has ended her days on earth.  There is every reason to be thankful that her death has been so little attended by painful or harassing circumstances so far as herself was concerned and we shall all I am sure have a grateful & affectionate remembrance of her many excellent qualities. I know of nothing to prevent my meeting you tomorrow at Euston Square and if nothing very particular occurs to keep me here I shall be very happy to meet you there at the time you mention.

I remain

Yours affectionately

J Philip Green

*[Ann Green]

JRL Box 3/4     [Ref: JA/JPG/202]

 

 

 

 

 

Letter written by Henry Green to his cousin J B Green Esq

 

                                                                   Upper King St [Maidstone]                                      July 9 1859

My dear Sir

I have concluded to remain in Maidstone until Tuesday morning and write a line or two to say that I shall be happy to dine with you on Monday  3 o’clock. I think you said was to be the time.

With kind regards believe me

Yours very sincerely

Henry Green

[HMA 7/2/51]

 

 

 

                                                            London                                                           12th July 1859

Dear Mother

My father has returned to London from Maidstone & called upon me this morning. He had been to the hotel in Percy Street & finding the place comfortable & looking promising for a quiet abode determined to stay there.  I had a very pleasant visit to Canterbury on Saturday & Sunday. I had never been there before & was very much pleased & interested with what I saw.  Meta Gaskell gave me a letter of introduction to the Miss Jacksons* whose mother was as perhaps you know a Miss Pilkington & niece of the first Mrs Dr Brandreth.  They had I think been wards of Dr Lyall & lived with him till his death.  They of course know Canterbury well & were very kind & obliging in shewing me the cathedral which I should not have been able to see completely on the Sunday had not Louisa Jackson procured the key for me & conducted me through.  I found from Miss Jackson that some of the Thomas Brandreth’s were staying in Canterbury.  To one of them Arthur Brandreth I was introduced he is in the Indian civil service has I believe most excellent prospects having already reached a post of considerable importance & responsibility. He is a quiet & rather reserved person about 27 or 28 but we got on pretty well together.  He afterwards sent me their address in Park Street Grosvenor Square & hoped I would call on them before long.  In the evening I called on Mr Frank Holland who lives within a few doors of the Jacksons & found him alone. In a few minutes Mrs F Holland & one of her sisters came in.  Both of them but especially the latter struck me as being very lively & intelligent persons. The Jacksons seem to consider the Lyalls of Harbledown as a decidedly clever & agreeable family “alive” I think was one of the words they used. I cannot exactly say what day I shall be coming to Knutsford but I hope it will not be later than the first week in August.  You many thank heaven that you are not in London at present where the heat is quite overwhelming depriving one as it were of all energy & power of exertion

With best l